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January 08, 2006

600R Pues Si Vivimos

Title: "Pues Si Vivimos," Mexican folk hymn, anonymous translation, "In All Our Living," PUES SI VIVIMOS, Irregular, traditional hymn; The hymn appears in The New Century Hymnal along with other, copyrighted stanzas as no. 499; likewise is the case with Mil voces para celebrar (in which still other stanzas appear) where it is included as no. 337. It does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in Hymns of the Spirit Two. The hymn was transcribed by Gerturde Suppe when she heard it sung by two church women from Mexico. The lyrics are based on Romans 14:8, but have other resonances as well.

PUES SI VIVIMOS (Irr.)

1. Pues si vi-vi-mos, pa-ra Dios vi-vi~mos
y si mo-ri-mos, pa-ra Dios mo-ri~mos.
Se-a que vi-va-mos, o que mu-ra~mos,
so-mos del buen Dios, so-mos del buen Dios.

2. In all our liv-ing, we be-long to God;
and in our dy-ing, we are still with God;
So,_ wheth-er liv-ing, or wheth-er dy~ing,
we be-long to God; we be-long to God.

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All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2005 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 03:56 AM | Comments (0)

January 01, 2006

328R O Pure Reformers, Not in Vain

Original Title: "O Pure Reformers, Not in Vain," John Greenleaf Whittier (1843), COVENTRY, C.M., Samuel Howard (c. 1762); New Title: same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), ST. ANNE, C.M., William Croft (1708). Whittier was an 19th Century American Quaker poet, and a well-known advocate of the abolition of slavery in the United States. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal. Though the hymn predates both his ministry and the holiday, many may find it appropriate to commemorate the life of Martin Luther King, Jr. The lyrics speak most directly to Ephesians 4:11-16, which tells of prophets and teachers sent to "equip the saints" so that we might not be like children "tossed here and there by waves, and carried about by every wind of doctrine." Also notable are echoes of the conflict between "lies" and "truth" in the gospel of John, see John 17:17, John 8:44.

ST. ANNE (C.M.)

1. O pure re-form-ers! not in vain,
your trust in hu-man-kind;
the good which blood-shed could not gain,
your peace-ful zeal shall find.


2. The truths you urge are borne a-broad
by eve-ry wind and tide;
the voice of na-ture and of God
speaks out up-on your side.

3. The wea-pons which your hands have found
are those which heaven has wrought,
light, truth, and love; your bat-tle ground,
the free, broad field of thought.

4. O may no self-ish pur-pose break
the beau-ty of your call,
no lie from throne or al-tar shake
your stead-y faith in all.


5. Press on! and if we may not share
the glo-ry of your cry,
we'll ask at least, in earn-est prayer,
that your dreams may not die. A-men.

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All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2005 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 06:28 PM | Comments (0)

262R Now Thank We All Our God

Original Title: "Now Thank We All Our God," Martin Rinkart (1636), trans. Catherine Winkworth (1858), NUN DANKET, 6.7.6.7.6.6.6.6., Johann Cruger (1647), harm. Mendelssohn; New Title: "Now Thank We All Our God," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. One of the best-known hymns of the Church Universal. It appears as a two-stanza hymn in Singing the Living Tradition, at no. 32; it appears without parental metaphors in The New Century Hymnal, at no. 419. It echoes both Psalm 67, and other psalms.

NUN DANKET (6.7.6.7.6.6.6.6.)

1. Now thank we all our God, with heart and hands and voi-ces,
who won-drous things has done, in whom this world re-joi-ces;
who from our par-ents’ arms has blessed us on our way
with count-less gifts of love, and still is ours to-day.


2. O may this boun-teous God through all our life be near us,
with ev-er joy-ful hearts and bless-èd peace to cheer us;
and keep us in true grace, and guide us when per-plexed;
and free us from all ills, in this world and the next!

3. All praise and thanks to God the Fa-ther now be giv-en;
God the Mo-ther who reigns su-preme in high-est heav-en;
The one E-ter-nal God, whom earth and heaven a-dore;
for thus it was, is now, and shall be ev-er-more.

Some congregations may wish to attempt one or more of the original German stanzas (the editors of the website would be happy to create scores for these were there any request):

1. Nun dank-et al-le Gott
mit Herz-en, Mund und Händ-en,
der gro-sse Ding-e tut
an uns und al-len End-en;
Der uns von Mut-ter-leib
und Kind-es-bein-en an
un-zäh-lig viel zu gut
bis hie-her hat ge-tan.

2. Der e-wig reich-e Gott
woll uns in uns-erm Leb-en
ein Imm-er fröh-lich Herz
und ed-len Fried-en geb-en,
und uns in sein-er Gnad
er-halt-en fort und fort
und uns aus al-ler Not
er-lös-en hier und dort.

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All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2005 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 01:09 AM | Comments (0)