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December 14, 2005

218R Where Cross the Crowded Ways (of Life)

Original Title: "Where Cross the Crowded Ways of Life," Frank Mason North (1905), AUCORITATE SAECULI, L.M., Angers Church Melody; New Title: "Where Cross the Crowded Ways (of Life)," rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Neither the hymn nor the tune appears in Singing the Living Tradition. North was a Methodist, served as president of the Federal (now National) Council of Churches, and was a native of New York City, whose bustling pace is manifest in these lyrics. Though at odds with Hymns of the Spirit Two, cyberhymnal.org gives the date of publication as 1903 in The Christian City (with the tune as GERMANY, which is how it appears as hymn no. 543 in the United Church of Christ's New Century Hymnal). The site enigmatically notes a biblical allusion to Matthew 22:9. Less obscure might be Matthew 10:40-42 (NRSV): "Whoever welcomes you welcomes me ... and whoever gives even a cup of cold water to one of these little ones in the name of a disciple—truly I tell you, none of these will lose their reward."

AUCTORITATE SAECULI (L.M.)

1. Where cross the crowd-ed ways of life,
where sound out cries, our rac-es run;
a-bove the noise of self-ish strife,
we hear your voice, O Hu-man One.*

2. In haunts of wretch-ed-ness and need,
on shadow-ed thresh-olds full with fears,
from paths where hide the lures of greed,
we catch the vi-sion of your tears.

3. From ten-der child-hood's help-less-ness,
from lone-some grief, and burd-ened toil,
from fam-ished souls, from sor-row's stress,
your heart has ne-ver known re-coil.

4. The cup of wa-ter given for you,
still holds the fresh-ness of your grace;
Yet long these mul-ti-tudes to view
the sweet com-pas-sion of your face.

5. O Teach-er, from the moun-tain-side
make haste to heal these hearts of pain;
a-mong these rest-less throngs a-bide;
O tread the ci-ty's streets a-gain.


6. Till all earth's child-ren learn to love
and fol-low where your feet have trod,
till, glo-rious from your heaven a-bove,
shall come the ci-ty of our God!

* The 'Human One' is the phrase used for 'Son of Man' in the AIV edition of the Bible.

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213S Entre el vaivén de la ciudad

Título original: "Where Cross the Crowded Ways of Life," Frank Mason North (1905), traductor anónimo, AUCORITATE SAECULI, 8.8.8.8., Angers Church Melody; Título nuevo: "Entre el vaivén de la ciudad," rev. REH (2005), misma tonada. El himno aparece en el himnario metodista Mil voces para celebrar (1996) como no. 296, pero con la tonada GERMANY (L.M.).

AUCTORITATE SAECULI (8.8.8.8.)

1. En-tre el vai-vén de la ciu-dad,
más fuer-te a-ún que su ru-mor;
en lid de ra-za y so-cie-dad,
tu voz o-í-mos, Re-den-tor.


2. Do-quie-ra e-xis-ta ex-plo-ta-ción,
fal-te tra-ba-jo, no haya pan;
en los um-bra-les del te-rror,
Ra-bi-no, vé-mos-te llo-rar.


3. Un va-so de a-gua pue-de ser,
hoy de tu gra-cia, la se-ñal;
mas ya las gen-tes quie-ren ver
tu com-pa-si-va y san-ta faz.

4. Has-ta que triun-fe tu dul-zor
y el mun-do pue-da o-ír tu voz
y de los cie-los, mi a-mor,
des-cien-da la Ciu-dad de Dios.

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217R Not Only Where God's Free Wind Blows

Original Title: "Not Only Where God's Free Wind Blows," Shepherd Knapp (1908), LOBB GOTT, IHR CHRISTEN, 8.6.8.8.6., Nikolaus Hermann, harm. J.S. Bach; New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2005), same hymn tune. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in the United Church of Christ's New Century Hymnal, though the tune does appear to the broadly theistic hymn "Dear Weaver of Our Lives' Design," by Unitarian Universalist Nancy C. Dorian, as no. 22 in the former. Shepherd Knapp was an American Congregationalist. The lyrics seem to echo John 3:8, wherein Jesus is purported to have said that "the wind blows where it chooses, and you hear the sound of it, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who is born of the Spirit." (NRSV)

LOBT GOTT, IHR CHRISTEN (8.6.8.8.6.)

1. Not on-ly where God's free winds blow
or in the si-lent wood,
but where the ci-ty's rest-less flow
is ne-ver still, God's love we know,
and find that pre-sence good.

2. Dear God, the sun whose light is sweet,
on hill and plain and sea,
does cheer the ci-ty's bu-sy street,
and they that pass with wea-ry feet
give thanks for light free-ly.

3. O boun-ties from the field and mine
come at the ci-ty's call;
the fire up-on the heart di-vine
and home, where lights of kind-ness shine,
the dear-est gift of all.

4. More near than out-ward gifts art thou,
Sove-reign of hu-man-kind,
yea, those who un-der bur-dens bow
of toil and care thou dost en-dow
with ri-ches of the mind.

5. But in the ci-ty's grief and shame
dost thou re-fuse a part?
Ah, no, for e're burns there a flame
of hu-man help in Christ's dear name;
There, most of all, thou art.

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216R Onward, Onward, Though the Region

Original Title: "Onward, Onward, Though the Region," Samuel Johnson (1847), STUTTGART, 8.7.8.7., Christian Friedrich Witt in Psalmodia Sacra (Gotha 1715); New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Neither the hymn nor the tune appears in Singing the Living Tradition. Prior to its publication in Hymns of the Spirit Two, the hymn was known as "Onward, Christian, Though the Region." Though "Samuel Johnson" is the name of a number of historical figures, indeed even more than one hymnist, this Samuel Johnson was a 19th Century American Unitarian. Beyond the allusion to the Lord's Prayer in Matthew 6:10, there is likewise an echo of Psalm 91:11 (AIV): "For God will command God's angels concerning you to guard you in all your ways."

STUTTGART (8.7.8.7.)

1. On-ward, on-ward, though the re-gion
where you are be drear and lone;
God has set a guar-dian le-gion
ver-y near you; press e'er on.

2. By the thorn road, and none o-ther,
is the mount of vi-sion won;
Tread it, shrink not, sis-ter, bro-ther,
Je-sus trod it; press e'er on.


3. By a trust-ful, calm en-deav-or,
guid-ing, cheer-ing, like the sun,
earth-bound heart, ere shall de-liv-er;
Oh, for their sake, press e'er on.

4. Be this world the wis-er, strong-er,
for a life of pain and peace;
While it needs you, oh, no long-er
pray now for a quick re-lease.

5. Pray that ere your du-ty ful-fill,
that you be the faith-ful one,
by the prayer of Je-sus, 'My will
not, but yours, Ab-ba, be done.'

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215R Not Always on the Mount May We

Original Title: "Not Always On the Mount May We," Frederick Lucian Hosmer (1912), TRANSYLVANIA, L.M., arranged from a 16th Century Hungarian Chorale, by Robert Levine Sanders; New Title: Same title, alt. REH (2005), same hymn tune. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but TRANSYLVANIA is paired therein with hymn no. 322, "Thanks Be for These," by the Gilberts. In some ways, the hymn in Singing the Living Tradition is a rewrite of the present hymn using more humanistic images (though not lacking suggestions of the Divine), for example substituting "the Spirit's tidal ebb and flow" with "moments of grief, days of delight, triumph and failure intertwine." Hosmer was an American Unitarian; Richard Seward Gilbert and Joyce Timmerman Gilbert are 20th Century Unitarian Universalists. It is worth pointing out that the earlier hymn fits into what must be an exceedingly limited collection of music, that being "hymns written by Unitarians in North America for Transfiguration Sunday" (the Sunday immediately prior to Ash Wednesday); See Luke 9:29-31.

TRANSYLVANIA (L.M.)

1. Not al-ways on the mount may we
rapt in the heaven-ly vi-sion be:
The shores of thought and feel-ing know
the Spir-it's ti-dal ebb and flow.

2. 'O it is good a-bid-ing here,'
We cry, the heaven-ly pre-sence near:
The vi-sion va-nish-es, our eyes
are lift-ed in-to va-cant skies.

3. Yet has one such ex-al-ted hour
up-on the soul re-deem-ing power,
and in its strength, through af-ter days,
we tra-vel our ap-poin-ted ways,

4. Till all the low-ly vale grows bright,
trans-fi-gured in re-mem-bered light,
and in un-ti-ring souls we bear
the fresh-ness of the up-per air.


5. The mount for vi-sion: but be-low
the paths of dai-ly du-ty go,
and no-bler life there-in shall own
the pat-tern on the moun-tain shown.


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December 13, 2005

214R Rabbi and Worker of Years Past

Original Title: "O Master Workman of the Race," Jay Thomas Stocking (1912), OLD 137TH, C.M.D., One and Fiftie Psalms of David (1556); New Title: "Rabbi and Worker of Years Past," alt. REH (2005), same hymn tune. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition. Stocking was an American Congregationalist. The source of OLD 137TH is also thought to be John Day's Psalter (1553), although this is not what Hymns of the Spirit Two has to say on the matter. The disciples of Jesus called him "rabbi," translated as "magister" in Latin; this appears variously as master, teacher and rabbi in English versions of the Bible; all speak to Jesus' teaching ministry, but only the final designation in English makes clear his identity as a Jewish teacher. The lyrics seem to echo Luke 2:24b (NKJV): "Did you not know that I must be about My Father's business?"

OLD 137TH (C.M.D.)

1. Rab-bi and Work-er of years past, the one from Gal-i-lee,
who with the mind of ear-ly youth sub-lime things did per-ceive,
we give thanks for a child-hood faith that shone a whole life through;
"Did you not know it is my work, and our God's work to do?"

2. O Car-pen-ter of Na-za-reth, Buil-der of life di-vine,
who shapes our lives to God’s own law, your own, the true de-sign,
build us a tower of Christ-like height, that we the land may view,
and, lo, like you, our nob-lest work, the Sove-reign's work to do.


3. O one who does the vi-sion send and ere gives each a task,
and with the task suf-fic-ient strength, show us your will, we ask;
Give us a cons-cience bold and good, give us a pur-pose true,
that it may be our high-est joy, our Sove-reign's work to do.


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December 12, 2005

213R We Who Would Valiant Be

Original Title: "He Who Would Valiant Be," John Bunyan (1684), mod. Percy Dearmer in the English Hymnal (London 1906), MONKS GATE, 6.5.6.5.6.6.6.5., English Traditional Melody, adapt. Ralph Vaughan Williams (1906); New Title: "We Who Would Valiant Be," rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. John Bunyan, a Congregationalist and Baptist preacher in England, wrote these words in prison, in his work Pilgrim's Progress, for refusing to conform to the state church; the original title then was "Who Would True Valour See." Dreamer added the phrases "follow the Master" and "Lord, thou dost defend us with thy Spirit" only in 1906. These both become "Savior" in the United Church of Christ version published in the New Century Hymnal, paired with with tune ST. DUNSTAN'S, as no. 494. The version in Singing the Living Tradition, though as here set to the tune MONKS GATE as no. 206, eschews explicit identification of the Divine, in some senses truer to Bunyan than Dreamer (See no. 213S herein). The Dearmer version resonates with John 12:26a (NRSV): "Whoever serves me must follow me, and where I am, there will my servant be also."

MONKS GATE (6.5.6.5.6.6.6.5.)

1. We who would va-liant be, come wind, come wea-ther,
fol-low in con-stan-cy the Day-star ev-er.
There’s no dis-cour-age-ment shall make us once re-lent
our first a-vowed in-tent to live as Pil-grims.

2. Who so be-set us round with dis-mal sto-ries
do but them-selves con-found— our strength the more is.
No foes shall stay our might; though we with gi-ants fight,
we will make good our right to live as Pil-grims.

3. Since, God, you e'er de-fend us with your spir-it,
we know we at the end, shall life in-her-it.
Then fanc-ies flee a-way! We’ll fear not what they say,
we’ll lab-or night and day to live as Pil-grims.

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December 11, 2005

213S We Who Would Valour See

Original Title: "He Who Would Valiant Be," John Bunyan (1684), mod. Percy Dearmer in the English Hymnal (London 1906), MONKS GATE, 6.5.6.5.6.6.6.5., English Traditional Melody, adapt. Ralph Vaughan Williams (1906); New Title: "We Who Would Valour See," based on John Bunyan's original words, rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. John Bunyan, a Congregationalist and Baptist preacher in England, wrote these words in prison, in his work Pilgrim's Progress, for refusing to conform to the state church. This version uses Bunyan's original capitalization, and makes no use of Dreamer's modifications. The text of resonates with Acts 4:13 and Acts 4:29, in which the "servants" of Jesus are recognized as acting with "boldness" or "constancy," the exact term varying with the translation.

MONKS GATE (6.5.6.5.6.6.6.5.)

1. We who would Va-lour see
Let us come hi-ther;
One here will Con-stant be,
Come Wind, come Wea-ther.
There's no Dis-cour-age-ment,
Shall make us once Re-lent,
Our first a-vow'd In-tent,
To live as Pil-grims.

2. Who so be-set us round,
With dis-mal Sto-ries,
Do but them-selves Con-found;
Our Strength the more is.
No Li-on can us fright,
We'll with a Gi-ant Fight,
But we will have a right,
To live as Pil-grims.


3. Hob-gob-lin, nor foul Fiend,
Can daunt our Spir-it:
We know, we at the end,
Shall Life In-her-it.
Then Fan-cies fly a-way,
We'll fear not what they say,
We'll la-bour Night and Day,
To live as Pil-grims.


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December 10, 2005

212R Christ Calls 'Take Up the Cross'

Original Title: "Thou Say'st, 'Take Up Thy Cross,'" Francis Turner Palgrave (1865), ST. THOMAS, S.M., Aaron Williams (1763); New Title: "Christ Call 'Take Up the Cross,'", rev. REH (2005), OLD 134TH (S.M.), Genevan Psalter (1543), arr. William Crotch (1836). The tune is also known as ST. MICHAEL and CALVIN. The text resonantes with Matthew 4:19(b): "Jesus ... said to them, 'Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.'" Matthew 4:19b (NRSV). Palgrave was a English Anglican, and also held a chair as professor of poetry at Oxford. The hymn appears neither in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

OLD 134 (S.M.)

1. Christ calls: 'Take up the cross,
O friends, then fol-low me,'
the night is dim,
the soles worn thin,
yet we fol-low free-ly.

2. Come faint and far the voice,
from vales of Gal-i-lee;
Vi-sion ere fades
in an-cient shades;
how do we serve free-ly?

3. O hea-vy cross of faith,
in what we can-not see,
as once re-store
the self of yore
as we fol-low free-ly.

4. If not as once you came
in true hu-man-i-ty
come yet with-in
as guest a-gain
so we fol-low free-ly.


5. With-in our heart of hearts,
in near-est near-ness be:
Set up a throne
with-in your own,
Christ, we fol-low free-ly.

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December 09, 2005

211R Not Long on Hermon's Holy Height

Original Title: "Not Long on Hermon's Holy Height," Theodore Claudius Pease (1891), ANGELUS, L.M., Cantica Spiritualia (1847), melody by Georg Joseph (1657); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Pease was a 19th Century American Congregationalist. Hermon is the name of a mountain, or chain of mountains, in northern Palestine, as in: "The north and the south thou hast created them: Tabor and Hermon shall rejoice in thy name," Psalm 89:12 (KJV). The location of the transfiguration in the New Testament is not explicit; see Matthew 17:1-6; Mark 9:1-8 and Luke 9:28-36; Origen (and other early Church scholars) believed that it occurred, in fact, on Mount Tabor (and close followers of Origen, an early Universalist, are welcome to substitute "Tabor" for "Hermon"). The hymn and the hymn tune do not appear in The New Century Hymnal nor in Singing the Living Tradition.

ANGELUS (L.M.)

1. Not long on Her-mon's ho-ly height,
the heaven-ly vi-sion fills our sight,
we may not breathe that pur-er air,
nor build our tab-er-nac-les there.

2. If with the Teach-er we would go,
our feet must thread the vale be-low,
where dim the lone-ly path-ways wind,
the gold-en glo-ry left be-hind.


3. Where hung-ry souls ask one to feed,
where wander-ers cry for one to lead,
where help-less hearts in chains are bound,
the Auth-or of Faith still be found.


4. There, bend-ing pa-tient o'er a task,
no rai-ment white our eyes shall ask,
con-tent while through each cloud we trace,
the glo-ry of the Rab-bi's face.


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Posted by rehurst at 02:40 AM | Comments (0)

December 08, 2005

210R A Voice by Jordan's Shore

Original Title: "A Voice by Jordan's Shore," Samuel Longfellow (1864), CAMBRIDGE (S.M.), Ralph Harrison (c. 1784), alt.; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), ST. AUGUSTINE (S.M.D.), from Chorale Songs for Four Voices (1769). Samuel Longfellow, a Unitarian poet, edited the first Hymns of the Spirit (1864); this hymn appeared therein. The hymn nor the tune appears in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. The lyrics speak to what in Greek is called "metanoia," or what is misleadingly translated as "repentance" in English. Longfellow chose "reform," which is closer to the mark; this new version includes variations on "re-think," lest there be any taint of overly zealous piety. "Metanoia" cried out both John the Baptist in Matthew 3:2, as well as Jesus in Mark 1:15, "the reign of God is near, be new-minded (i.e., repent, or literally, re-think) and believe in this good news." The Jordan and a "baptism of repentance," and a "voice" in the wilderness, elements in the hymn, are all mentioned in Luke 3:3-4.

ST. AUGUSTINE (S.M.D.)

1. A voice by Jor-dan's shore,
'Be new-mind-ed' I hear:
Re-form, re-think, be just e're-more;
God's grac-es ere draw near.
A voice in Gal-i-lee:
'A new mind' now the cheer;
Love God, and neigh-bor too, for see,
God's mer-cies ere draw near.

2. O voice of du-ty, still
speak forth, I hear with awe;
With you I trust a sove-reign will,
o-bey an in-ner law.
O high-er voice of love,
yet speak a word in me;
Through du-ty let me up-ward move,
to your pure li-ber-ty!


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December 07, 2005

209R O You Great Friend

Original Title: "O Thou Great Friend," Theodore Parker (1846), LANGRAN, 10.10.10.10., James Langran (1863); New Title: "O You Great Friend," rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Neither the tune nor the hymn appears in Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal. Theodore Parker was a 19th Century Unitarian minister and social reformer, leader within the "Transcendentalist" school and friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson, perhaps best known for "The Permanent and Transient in Christianity," a sermon given in 1841, on Luke 21:33 "Heaven and earth shall pass away: but my word shall not pass away." That "word," that is, the "truth" which "is still the light," is found in these lyrics; these constitute as well a liberal religious take on John 14:6a (NRSV), "Jesus said ... 'I am the way, and the truth, and the life.'"

LANGRAN (10.10.10.10.)

1. O you, Great Friend, to all the earth's child-ren,
who once ap-peared in humb-lest guise be-low,
sin to re-buke, to break the cap-tive’s chain,
to call the kin-dred forth from want and woe.


2. You would I sing: Your truth is still the light
which guides the na-tions grop-ing on their way,
stum-bling and fall-ing in dis-ast-rous night,
yet hop-ing ev-er for the per-fect day.

3. Yes, you are still the Life; You are the Way;
The hol-iest know— Light, Life and Way of Heaven;
And they who dear-ly hope and deep-ly pray,
toil by the Truth, Life, Way that you have given.

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December 06, 2005

208R O Teacher, Let Me Walk With You

Original Title: "O Master, Let Me Walk With Thee," Washington Gladden (1879), First Tune in Hymns of the Spirit Two, PLAISTOW, L.M., from Magdalen Hymns (c. 1760), Second Tune in Hymns of the Spirit Two, MARYTON, L.M., Henry Percey Smith (1874); New Title: "O Teacher, Let Me Walk With You," alt. REH (2005), MARYTON, L.M. Neither the hymn nor the tunes appear in Singing the Leaving Tradition, but the hymn, under the name "O Savior, Let Me Walk With You," to the tune MARYTON, is included in the United Church of Christ's New Century Hymnal as no. 503. Gladden was a Congregationalist minister, well known for his writings and lectures on social concerns during the 19th Century. The metaphor of walking or otherwise following occurs in the Christian Scriptures, in John 1:43, "Follow me," in Ephesians 4:1, where we are told to "lead a life worthy" to that we have been called, and in 1 John 2:6, in the line immediately after the lectionary reading for Easter 2B, in which we are told we "ought to walk as [Christ] walked." In the Hebrew Bible, famously, Micah 6:8 tells us what is required is that we "walk humbly" with our God.

MARYTON (L.M.)

1. O Tea-cher, let me walk with you,
in sim-ple paths of ser-vice true;
Tell me your se-cret; help me bear
the strain of toil, the fret of care.


2. Help me the slow of heart to move
by some clear, win-ning word of love;
Show me the way-ward feet to stay,
and guide them in the home-ward way.


3. Show me your pa-tience; with me be
in clo-ser, dear-er, com-pa-ny,
in work that keeps faith sweet and strong,
in trust that tri-umphs ov-er wrong.

4. In hope that sends a shin-ing ray
far down the fu-ture’s broad-ening way,
in peace that on-ly you can give,
O Tea-cher, with you let me live.


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Posted by rehurst at 02:45 AM | Comments (0)

December 05, 2005

207R When Love's Sovereign Sojourned (Here)

Original Title: "When the Lord of Love Was Here," Stopford Augustus Brooke (1881), MISERICORDE (7.7.5.7.7.5.), Robert L. Sanders (1932); New Title: "When Love's Sovereign Sojourned (Here)," rev. REH (2005), Same hymn tune. Neither hymn nor tune appears in either Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. Brooke was a 19th Century Irish writer and churchman, first ordained in the Chruch of England, but later he officiated as a Unitarian minister at Bedford chapel, Bloomsbury. The hymn recollects the words of Jesus that we are to "love God," and "love our neighbors" (even our enemies) as ourselves, and that all the law and prophets rest on these two commandments. Matthew 22:37, Mark 12:30, Luke 10:27. Also echoed in the hymn is 1 John 4:19-21, which records that Jesus "loved us" before we loved him. The "parables of God" of which Brooke speaks are found through out the gospels, but above all in Mark, chapter 4:1-20, in a series of stories regarding seeds, birds, soil, and the transforming and self-producing power of the earth. The UUA's Skinner House advises that it considers MISERICORDE to be in the public domain.

MISERICORDE (7.7.5.7.7.5.)

1. When Love's Sove-reign so-journed here,
hap-py hearts grew ev-er near,
though one heart was sad;
Worn and lone-some for our sake,
yet still turned a-side to make
all the wea-ry glad.

2. One who walked the fields, and drew
from the flowers and birds and dew
pa-ra-bles of God;
For with-in that heart of love
all the souls on earth did move,
God had an a-bode.

3. All the out-casts thronged to hear,
all the sor-row-ful drew near
to the Hea-ler's care;
deep and ear-thy were the ways
from which lov-ing grew to praise,
and from giv-ing, prayer.

4. O, be ours that power to keep
in the ver-y heart of grief,
and in tri-al, love;
In our weak-ness to be wise,
and through sor-rows to a-rise
to our God a-bove. A-men.

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Posted by rehurst at 02:48 AM | Comments (0)

December 04, 2005

206R O Love! O Light!

Original Title: "O Love! O Light!", John Greenleaf Whittier (1866), ST. AGNES, C.M., John Bacchus Dykes (1866); New Title: "O Love! O Light!," rev. REH (2005), Same hymn tune. The hymn is not included in either Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal, but the tune does appear as no. 281 and nos. 507-08 in the latter. Whittier was an 19th Century American Quaker poet, and a well-known advocate of the abolition of slavery in the United States. The biblical sources of the names used in the hymn are numerous; John 13:13, John 1:1, John 15:15. Also there is a resonance of St. Paul's hymn that speak of peering "through a glass, darkly." 1 Corinthians 13:12. The feast of Transfiguration is again a topic here.

ST. AGNES (C.M.)

1. O Love! O Life! Our faith and sight
your pres-ence now makes one,
as through trans-fig-ured clouds of white
we trace the noon-day sun.

2. So, to our mor-tal minds sub-dued,
flesh-veiled, but not con-cealed,
we know in you the par-ent-hood
and heart of God re-vealed.


3. We faint-ly know, dim-ly per-ceive,
in dif-fering phrase we pray;
In you, dim or clear, we own free
the Light, the Truth, the Way!


4. To do your will is more than praise,
as words are less than deeds;
and sim-ple trust can find your ways
we miss with chart of creeds.

5. Our friend, our kind-red, and our word,
What may your ser-vice be?
Nor name, nor form, nor ri-tual heard,
but fol-low-ing free-ly.


6. Your li-ta-nies, sweet of-fi-ces
of love and gra-ti-tude;
your sa-cred, di-vine li-tur-gies,
the joy of do-ing good.

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Posted by rehurst at 02:50 AM | Comments (0)

206S Oh Dios, pedimos que nos des

Título original: "Oh nuestro Padre, nuestro Dios," Autor desconocido, ST. AGNES, 8.6.8.6., John Bacchus Dykes (1866); Título nuevo: "Oh Dios, pedimos que nos des," alterado REH (2005), misma tonada.

The hymn "Oh nuestro Padre, nuestro Dios," appears in the United Methodist hymnal Mil voces para celebrar as no. 368, originally with four stanzas, as a hymn for New Years', with no known author, and without copyright. Here the first stanza has been removed (along with any gender references to God), the remaining stanzas re-arranged, as a general-use hymn. Though it was written to ST. AGNES, it is not a translation of 206R herein, direct or otherwise. A relatively close English translation follows, which is meant to give an idea of the Spanish lyrics, but which is not meant to be sung. The lyrics echo the "powers and principalities" language of Paul in Colossians 2:15; there is also a hint of the third petition of the Lord's pray or the prayer of Jesus in Matthew 6:10. A living faith, firm hope, and burning love also suggest St. Paul. Colossians 1:5-8, 1 Corithians 13:3, 1 Thessalonians 1:3. Likewise the passing away of time and goods suggest the passing away of the "temporal" and the persistence of the "eternal" alluded to in 2 Corinthians 4:18.

ST. AGNES (8.6.8.6.)

1. Oh Dios, pe-di-mos que nos des
en tu ser-vi-cio ar-dor;
fir-me es-pe-ran-za,
vi-va fe y más ar-dien-te a-mor.

2. Haz-nos sen-tir la va-ni-dad
de cuan-to e-xis-te a-quí;
gran-de-zas, bie-nes, po-tes-tad
pe-re-ce-rán al fin.


3. El cie-lo, el or-be, el mun-do es-tán
di-cien-do tu bon-dad;
la vi-da, el tiem-po pa-sa-rán
se-gún tu vo-lun-tad. A-mén.

Translation of the Spanish (not to be sung):

1. O God, we ask that you give us
in your most burning service
firm hope, a living faith,
and more ardent love.

2. Make known to us the vanity
of so much that exists here;
Majesty, goods, power
will perish in the end.


3. The heavens, the globe, the world,
are speaking your goodness;
Life and time will pass
according to your will. Amen.

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Posted by rehurst at 01:14 AM | Comments (0)

December 03, 2005

205R Jesus, the Very Thought of You

Original Title: "Jesus, the Very Thought of Thee," Bernard of Clairvaux (12th Century), trans. Edward Caswall (1858), WINDSOR, C.M., Damon's Psalmes (1591); New Title: "Jesus, the Very Thought of You," rev. REH (2005), FIRST MODE MELODY, C.M.D., Thomas Tallis (1505-1585). Bernard in his time was seen as the embodiment of its ideal: that of medieval monasticism at its highest development; he is considered both a saint in the Roman and Anglican churches (he is the patron of bees, beekeepers, candles and wax). The original Latin title is "Jesu, Dulcis Memoria." Caswall was an English Anglican priest, who converted to Roman Catholicism. Neither the hymn nor the tune appears in Singing the Living Tradition, but the hymn does appear under the name "Jesus-The Very Thought to Me," to the tune ST. AGNES in The New Century Hymnal. The lyrics speak of of the Pauline epistles, who tell us to find the joy of God through Jesus. 1 Peter 1:8, Philemon 2:1-11, Romans 5:11.

THIRD MODE MELODY (C.M.D.)

1. Je-sus, the ve-ry thought of you
with sweet-ness fills the breast;
But sweet-er far your face to see,
and in your pre-sence rest.
Nor voice can sing, nor heart can frame,
nor can the mem-ory find
a sweet-er sound than your blest name,
bear-er of hu-man-kind!

2. When once you do vi-sit the heart,
then truth be-gins to shine,
then earth-ly van-i-ties de-part,
then kind-les love di-vine.
O Je-sus, light of all be-low,
and fount of liv-ing fire,
sur-pass-ing all the joys we know,
and all we can de-sire.

3. O Je-sus, you beau-ty im-part
of an-gel worlds a-bove;
Your name is mu-sic to the heart,
in-flam-ing it with love.
Je-sus, the ve-ry thought of you
with sweet-ness fills the breast;
But sweet-er far your face to view,
and in your pre-sence rest.

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Posted by rehurst at 02:52 AM | Comments (0)

December 02, 2005

204R One Born of God, Immortal Love

Original Title: "Strong Son of God, Immortal Love," Alfred Tennyson, SONG FIVE, L.M., First Tune in Hymns of the Spirit Two, Orlando Gibbons (1623), ERNAN, L.M., Second Tune in Hymns of the Spirit Two, Lowell Mason; New Title: "One Born of God, Immortal Love," alt. REH (2005), hymn tune: SONG FIVE, L.M., (1623). Neither the hymn nor the tune appears in Singing the Living Tradition or in The New Century Hymnal, but the hymn does appear in The Hymnal (1940) of the (then thusly named) Protestant Episcopal Church, and other hymnals published throughout the Anglican Communion. Alfred Tennyson was a 19th Century English Anglican and British Poet Laureate from 1850 until his death; his most famous work was perhaps The Charge of the Light Brigade. One hears in the lyrics, "for we walk by faith, not by sight." 2 Corinthians 5:7 (NRSV). Also implicit therein is an answer to the question of Jesus, "who do they say I am?" Matthew 16:13.

SONG FIVE (L.M.)

1. One born of God, im-mor-tal love,
whom we, that have not seen thy face,
by faith, and faith a-lone, em-brace,
be-liev-ing where we can-not prove.

2. Thou seem-est hu-man and di-vine,
the high-est, hol-iest hu-man, thou.
Our wills are ours, we know not how;
Ours wills are ours, to make them thine.

3. Our lit-tle sys-tems have their day;
They have their day and cease to be;
They are but bro-ken lights of thee,
And thou, O Dawn, art more than they.

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Posted by rehurst at 02:55 AM | Comments (0)

December 01, 2005

204S Strong Son of God, Maternal Love

Original Title: "Strong Son of God, Immortal Love," Alfred Tennyson, SONG FIVE, L.M., First Tune in Hymns of the Spirit Two, Orlando Gibbons (1623), ERNAN, L.M., Second Tune in Hymns of the Spirit Two, Lowell Mason; New Title: "Strong Son of God, Maternal Love," alt. REH (2005), hymn tune: SONG FIVE, L.M., (1623). Neither the hymn nor the tune appears in Singing the Living Tradition or in The New Century Hymnal, but the hymn does appear in The Hymnal (1940) of the (then thusly named) Protestant Episcopal Church, and other hymnals published throughout the Anglican Communion. Alfred Tennyson was a 19th Century English Anglican and British Poet Laureate from 1850 until his death; his most famous work was perhaps The Charge of the Light Brigade. One hears in the lyrics, "for we walk by faith, not by sight." 2 Corinthians 5:7 (NRSV). Also implicit therein is an answer to the question of Jesus, "who do they say I am?" Matthew 16:13. Unlike 204R, this version is "gender inclusive," rather than "gender neutral," using the image of Jesus as our "Mother," as imagined by St. Julian of Norwich, as well as the very language of Luke 13:31-34, in which Jesus describes himself as a mother hen brooding over her chicks.

SONG FIVE (L.M.)

1. Strong Son of God, maternal love,
whom we, that have not seen thy face,
by faith, and faith a-lone, em-brace,
be-liev-ing where we can-not prove.

2. Thou seem-est hu-man and di-vine,
the high-est, hol-iest hu-man, thou.
Our wills are ours, we know not how;
Ours wills are ours, to make them thine.

3. Our lit-tle sys-tems have their day;
They have their day and cease to be;
They are but bro-ken lights of thee,
And thou, O Love, art more than they.

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Posted by rehurst at 02:57 AM | Comments (0)