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January 15, 2006

Sunday, February 5, 2006

Fifth Sunday After Epiphany (Year B)
February 5, 2006

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(Above) Sixth Mount Zion Baptist was organized in Richmond, Virginia in September 1867 by John Jasper (1812-1901), who would go on to become one of the nation's best known African-American ministers. Jasper served as pastor of the church for 34 years and is remembered most for his "Sun Do Move" sermon which he later delivered by invitation more than 250 times, including once before the Virginia General Assembly. The Church still meets at the same location in Richmond's historic Jackson Ward neighborhood.

February 2006
African-American History Month

From Singing the Living Tradition:
"Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen" No. 99
"When Israel Was in Egypt's Land" No. 104
"Lift Every Voice and Sing" No. 149
"We Shall Overcome" No. 169
"Come Sunday" No. 202
"Everytime I Feel the Spirit" No. 208
"Wade In the Water" No. 210
"We Are Climbing Jacob's Ladder" No. 211
"We Are Dancing Sarah's Circle" No. 212

Singing the Living Tradition
,
in contrast to Hymns of the Spirit Two, boasts an abundance of African-American spirituals and hymns. Some of these, those that are theist and Christian in nature, are above. Others, which speak more generally of freedom and other themes (without specifically invoking the divine) may be found in the index of Singing the Living Tradition, on page 654, under "African American spirituals." Most are what in the Episcopal tradition might be called "general hymns," and veritable "hymns for all seasons." Just a few, the two or three of the higher-numbered hymns, are seasonal.

Given that the celebration of the African history is month-long, these are appropriate throughout February; there are many from which to make a useful selection throughout the year. Some are difficult pieces, more appropriate for choirs, such as Duke Ellington's "Come Sunday." Others, while "African American," in source and theme, are musically closer to "standard" (if there is such a thing) non-African-American hymnody associated with the Church in the 19th and 20th century, such as "Lift Every Voice and Sing."


Isaiah 40:21-31

from Hymns of the Spirit Three:
"Praise to the Living God" No. 1R
"Yigdal Elohim Chai" No. 1R
"Al vivo Dios, loor" No. 1S

"Awake Our Souls, Away Our Fears" No. 103R


Psalm 147:1-11, 20c

from Hymns of the Spirit Three:
"Rejoice, O Pure in Heart" No. 13
"O God Builds Up Jerusalem" No 608R

"O God Builds Up Jerusalem" is adapted from "Praise Ye the Lord, 'Tis Good to Raise," a metrical rendition of Psalm 147 by Isaac Watts (1674-1748) that appeared in The Psalms of David (1719) to the tune ACCRINGTON by William Moore.

O God builds up Je-ru-sa-lem,
and ga-thers na-tions to The Name;
Love's mer-cy melts the stub-born soul,
and makes the bro-ken spi-rit whole.

Wis-dom formed stars, those heav’n-ly flames;
and counts their num-bers, calls their names;
And skies are vast, and know no bound,
A deep where all our thoughts are found.

Sing praise to God, exalt God high,
who spreads the clouds all round the sky;
where are pre-pared the fruit-ful rain,
and no drops may des-cend in vain.

Life makes the grass the hills a-dorn,
and clothes the smi-ling fields with corn;
The beasts with food Love's hands sup-ply,
and the young ra-vens when they cry.

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(Above) Members and deacons of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, using liturgical umbrellas and hand-made silver crosses. The head-dresses represent the Ten Commandments. The Ethiopian Orthodox, as old as any church in Europe, believe that the Ark of the Covenant resides with them.


1 Corinthians 9:16-23
Mark 1:29-39

from Hymns of the Spirit Three:
"Praise Be to God, the Almighty" No. 7
"A Mighty Fortress Is Our God" No. 304R

from Singing the Living Tradition:
"Precious Lord, Take My Hand" No. 199

from Singing the Journey:
"There Is a Balm in Gilead" No. 1045 (African American spiritual)

Copyright © 2006 Richard E. Hurst, www.hos3.com/hotw
This listing and other materials above may be printed, copied, distributed, reprinted in church or local group bulletins or newsletters, or otherwise used for nonprofit local worship or education with the inclusion of the copyright citation and the website as its source. It may not be used for profit or republication without prior permission (blondlieut@aol.com).

Posted by rehurst at January 15, 2006 03:47 AM

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