March 01, 2005

1R Praise to the Living God / Yigdal Elohim Chai

Original Title: "Praise to the Living God," Daniel ben Judah Dayyan (14th century), trans. Max Lansberg and Newton Mann, LEONI, 6.6.8.4.6.6.8.4., Synagogue Melody, arr. Meyer Lyon; New Name: "Praise to the Living God / Yigdal Elohim Chai," same hymn tune, rev. REH (2005). Moses Maimoides (1130-1205) drew up thirteen articles of Jewish faith; these were latter versified by Daniel ben Juddah Dayyan. The translation here is largely based on the work of Lansberg, a Reform rabbi, and Mann, a Unitarian minister, who worked collaboratively in the 1880s. A recast version (with additional work by Mann's successor, William Channing Gannett), omitting one stanza, appears as no. 215 in Singing the Living Tradition under the same name; under the name "The God of Abraham Praise," the hymn appears as no. 24 in The New Century Hymnal. Both appear to the tune LEONI, named for Meyer Lyon, cantor at the Great Synagogue in London. The lyrics here appear with all four verses, and two of the original Hebrew verses. The text makes reference to numerous texts in the Hebrew Bible; "I AM WHO I AM, this is my name forever," Exodus 3:14-15; God is the "first and last," Isaiah 44:6; the law is written on our hearts, Jeremiah 31:27-34. "So now, Israel, give heed to the statutes and ordinances," Deuteronomy 4:1.

LEONI (6.6.8.4.6.6.8.4.)

1. Praise to the liv-ing God! All prais~ed be~the Name,
who was and is~and is~to be, for aye the same!
The One E-ter-nal God ere aught that now ap-pears:
the First, the Last, be-yond all thought and time-less years!

2. Form-less, all love-ly forms, de-clare~God's love~li-ness;
no ho-li-ness~on earth~can e'er the Name ex-press.
God is Our Sove-reign sure, Cre-a-tion sings out praise;
And, ev-ery-where, a-bove, be-low, God's will o-beys.


3. The spir-it flow-eth free, high surg~ing where~it will;
in proph-et's word~did speak~of old, and speak-eth still.
Es-tab-lished is the law, and peer-less it shall stand,
deep writ up-on the hu-man heart, on sea or land.

4. E-ter-nal life hath God im-plant~ed in~the soul;
such love shall be~our strength~and stay while a-ges roll.
Praise to the liv-ing God! All prais-ed be the Name,
who was, and is, and is to be, for aye the same.


a. Yig-dal e-lo-him chai ve-yish-ta-bach,
nim-tsa ve-ein eit el me-tsi-u-to.
E-chad ve-ein ya-chid ke-yi-chu-do,
ne-lam ve-gam ein sof le-ach-du-to.

b. Ein lo de-mut ha-guf ve-ei-no-guf,
lo-na-a roch ei-lav ke-du-sha-to.
Kad-mon le-choi da-var a-sher niv-ra
ri-shon ve-ein rei-shit le-rei-shi-to.

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1S Al vivo Dios, loor / Yigdal elohim chai

Título: "Al vivo Dios, loor / Yigdal elohim chai," Daniel ben Judah Dayyan (c. 1400), traductores originales Max Lansberg, rabino reformista, y Newton Mann, pastor unitario (c. 1880), traductor al castellano, George P. Simmonds, rev. REH (2006), LEONI, 6.6.8.4.6.6.8.4., tonada hebrea, arm. de Meyer Lyon, el cantor de la Gran Sinagoga de Londres. No. 28, "Al Dios de Abraham, loor," en Mil voces para celebrar, pero con la letra traducida del metodista Thomas Olivers. "Ahora, pues, Israel, oye los estatutos y decretos," Deuteronomio 4:1 (RVR 1995).

LEONI (6.6.8.4.6.6.8.4.)

1. ¡Al vi-vo Dios, lo-or! Sus nom-bres ce-le-brad.
¡Al que~e-ra, es y~a-ún se-rá, mag-ni-fi-cad!
El so-lo,~e-ter-no Dios, de to-do~es cre-a-dor,
al ú-ni-co su-pre-mo ser can-tad lo-or.

2. Su dul-ce~es-pí-ri-tu ¡cuán li-bre~es en su~ob-rar!
Su voz por el pro-fe-ta~a-ún nos quie-re~ha-blar.
En to-do co-ra-zón su ley es-cri-ta~es-tá;
es tras-cen-den-te~y siem-pre fiel en tie-rra~y mar.

3. La Vi-da se so-pló en ca-da~hu-ma-no ser.
Su~a-mor am-pa-ro nos se-rá sin fe-ne-cer.
¡Al vi-vo Dios, lo-or! Sus nom-bres ce-le-brad.
¡Al que~e-ra, es y~a-ún se-rá, mag-ni-fi-cad!

a. Yig-dal e-lo-him chai ve-yish-ta-bach,
nim-tsa ve-ein eit el me-tsi-u-to.
E-chad ve-ein ya-chid ke-yi-chu-do,
ne-lam ve-gam ein sof le-ach-du-to.

b. Ein lo de-mut ha-guf ve-ei-no-guf,
lo-na-a roch ei-lav ke-du-sha-to.
Kad-mon le-choi da-var a-sher niv-ra
ri-shon ve-ein rei-shit le-rei-shi-to.

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March 02, 2005

2R Praise the Sovereign, Heavens Adoring

Original Title: "Praise the Lord, Ye Heavens, Adore Him," Foundling Chapel College by Thomas Coram (1796) & Edward Osler, MENDELSSOHN (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.), Jacob Ludwig Mendelssohn-Bartholdy; New Title: "Praise the Sovereign, Heavens Adoring," rev. REH (2008), HYFRYDOL (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.), Rowland Hugh Pritchard, 1855.

HYFRYDOL (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.)

1. Praise the Sove-reign, heavens a-dor-ing;
An-gels sing-ing in the height;
Sun and moon, at once re-joic-ing;
Sing-ing, all the stars of light.
Praise the One who once has spo-ken;
Worlds the migh-ty voice o-beyed.
Laws, which nev-er shall be brok-en
For their gui-dance God has made.

2. Praise the Sove-reign ev-er glo-rious;
Nev-er shall the pro-mise fail.
God has made the saints vic-to-rious;
Sin and death shall not pre-vail.
Praise the One of our sal-va-tion;
Hosts on high, that power pro-claim.
Heaven and earth and all cre-a-tion,
Laud and mag-ni-fy the Name.

3. Wor-ship, hon-or, glo-ry, bless-ing,
God, we of-fer un-to you.
Young and old, all praise ex-press-ing,
In glad hom-age come to you.
All the saints in heaven a-dore you;
We would bow be-fore your throne.
As your an-gels serve be-fore you,
So on earth your will be done.

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The first stanza of the hymn is a paraphrase of Psalm 148; see also Psalm 29. See also Wisdom of Solomon 1:14, "And the generative forces of the world are wholesome, and there is no destructive poison in them;" compare the lyrics "death on earth shall not prevail."

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The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal. Below is another revised version, entitled "Praise the Sovereign, Heavens Above," rev. REH (2006), to the tune BENEVENETO (7.7.7.7. D):

BENEVENTO (7.7.7.7. D)

1. Praise the Sove-reign, heavens a-bove;
Sun and moon, re-joice with love;
Sing praise, an-gels in the heights;
Sing praise, all bright stars and lights.
[[Praise for God's words spo-ken thus
Co-ve-nant made e'er for us]]
Worlds the migh-ty voice obey-ed,
for their gui-dance God has made.

2. Praise the Sove-reign Glo-ri-ous,
praised by saints vic-to-ri-ous.
Nev-er shall the pro-mise fail:
Death on earth shall not pre-vail.
[[Praise our God, re-deem-ing all:
Heaven and earth's cre-a-tive call]]
Hosts on high, that power pro-claim:
Laud and mag-ni-fy the Name.

3. Ho-nor, wor-ship, love, bless-ing;
Young and old, trust ex-press-ing;
and in ho-mage bend the knee.
We lift our laud un-to thee;
[[All saints in heaven thee a-dore;
an-gels serve thee ev-er-more.]]
Thou art our e-ter-nal sun:
May on earth thy will be done.

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Original lyrics as they appear in Hymns of the Sprit Two:

1. Praise the Lord: ye heavens, adore him;
Praise him, angels in the height.
Sun and moon, rejoice before him;
Praise him, all ye stars of light.
Praise the Lord, for he hath spoken;
Worlds his mighty voice obeyed.
Laws which never shall be broken
For their guidance he hath made.

2. Praise the Lord, for he is glorious;
Never shall his promise fail.
God hath made his saints victorious;
Sin and death shall not prevail.
Praise the God of our salvation;
Hosts on high, his power proclaim.
Heaven and earth and all creation,
Laud and magnify his Name.

3. Worship, honor, glory, blessing,
Lord, we offer unto thee.
Young and old, thy praise expressing,
In glad homage bend the knee.
All the saints in heaven adore thee;
We would bow before thy throne.
As thine angels serve before thee,
So on earth thy will be done.

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March 03, 2005

3R Holy Spirit, Source of Gladness

Original Title: "Holy Spirit, Source of Gladness," Paulus Gerhardt (1648), trans. John Christian Jacobi (c. 1725), adapted Samuel Longellow, ALTA TRINITA BEATA, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., Laudi Sprituali (14th Century), adapted Robert L. Sanders (1937); New Title: "Holy Spirit, Source of Gladness," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Paulus Gerhart was a 17th Century German Lutheran; Samuel Longfellow was a 19th Century American Unitarian, and editor of Hymns of the Spirit One. The hymn echoes Psalm 4:7, "you have put a gladness in my heart." "To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit for the common good," 1 Corinthians 12:7. It does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

ALTA TRINITA BEATA (8.7.8.7. D)

1. Ho-ly Spir-it source of glad-ness
come with all thy ra-diance bright,
o'er our wea-ri-ness and sad-ness,
breathe thy life and shed thy light!
Send us thine il-lu-mi-na-tion,
ba-nish all our fears at length;
rest up-on this con-gre-ga-tion,
spir-it of un-fail-ing strength.

2. Let that love which knows no mea-sure,
now in quick-ening showers de-scend,
bring-ing us the rich-est trea-sure
we can wish or God can send.
Hear our earn-est sup-pli-ca-tion,
ev-'ry strug-gling heart re-lease;
rest up-on this con-gre-ga-tion,
spir-it of un-trou-bled peace!

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March 04, 2005

4R Sing Praise to the Sovereign

Original Title: "Praise the Lord of Heaven," Thomas Briarly Brown (1844), WARUM SIND DIE THRÄNEN, 6.5.6.5.6.5.6.5., Johann Abraham Peter Schultz (1785); New Title: "Sing Praise to the Sovereign," rev. REH (2008), ST. DENIO, 11.11.11.11., Welsh Melody (1839).

ST. DENIO (11.11.11.11.)

1. Sing praise to the Sove-reign who reigns in the height;
Prais-es sing, all an-gels, sing praise, stars of light;
Sing praise, skies, and wa-ters which a-bove the skies,
When the word com-mand-ed, firm-ly did a-rise.

2. Prais-es sing, all foun-tains of the deeps and seas,
Rocks and hills and moun-tains, ce-dars and all trees;
Sing praise, clouds and va-pors, snow and hail and fire,
Stor-my wind ful-fil-ling on-ly one de-sire.

3. Sing praise, fowls and cat-tle, all queens and all kings;
Sing praise, men and wo-men, all cre-a-ted things;
For the name of God is ex-cel-lent a-lone;
On the earth, a foot-stool; o'er heav-en, a throne.

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The hymn lyrics constitue a paraphrase of Psalm 148; see also Pslam 29. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2008 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

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Below are alternative lyrics (rev. REH, 2006) that follow the original not quiet as closely, but which do undertake a more environmental message:

1. Sing praise to the Sove-reign that dwells in the heights;
Sing prais-es, all an-gels; sing praise, stars and lights;
Sing praise, skies and wa-ters; sing praise, bees and flies;
As the Word com-mands us, as ste-wards we rise.

2. Sing praise to the One that moves deeps and the seas,
Rocks, hills and the moun-tains; green ce-dars and trees;
Sing praise, clouds and va-pors; snow, hail and swift fire;
Sing praise by Earth ten-ding: ere E-den's de-sire.

3. Sing praise to the Day-spring, all flo-ra and beasts!
Sing prais-es all peo-ples, phy-si-cians and priests!
For in the di-vine name, we ev-er shall toil,
With pro-mis-es to keep, to air, shore and soil.

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March 05, 2005

5R O Holy Angels Bright

Original Title: "Ye Holy Angels Bright," Richard Baxter (1681), DARWALL'S 148TH, 6.6.6.6.4.4.4.4., John Darwall (1770); New Title: "O Holy Angels Bright," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Baxter was a 17th century Anglican "Nonconformist." John Darwall's tune is called simply DARWALL in Hymns of the Spirit Two, a frequently used alternative title for the same piece of music. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. See Revelation 5:11, "the voice of many angels."

DARWALL'S 148TH (6.6.6.6.4.4.4.4.)

1. O ho-ly an-gels bright,
who wait at God's sure hand,
or through the realms of light
fly on di-vine com-mand,
as-sist our song,
for else the theme
too high does seem
for mor-tal tongue.

2. Let not the prais-es grow
on pros-perous heights a-lone,
but in val-leys be-low,
let the great love be known.
Let no dis-tress
curb and con-trol
my wing-ed soul
and praise sup-press.

3. My soul, O bear your part,
tri-umph in God a-bove,
and with a well-tuned heart,
O sing the songs of love.
Let all your days
till life shall end,
what-ever is sent,
be filled with praise. A-men.


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March 06, 2005

6R O Worship Thy God

Original Title: "O Worship Thy King," Robert Grant, LYONS, 10.10.11.11., attributed to Johann Michael Haydn, New Title: "O Worship Thy God," rev. REH (2006), OLD 104TH, 10.10.11.11, Thomas Ravenscroft (1621). As a paraphrase of Psalm 104, a recast version of Robert Grant's hymn is offered here set to OLD 104TH, a tune with which it is sometimes paired. Other versions of Grant's hymn, with inclusive language and set to LYONS, may be found in Singing the Living Tradition as "We Worship Thee, God," as no. 285, and in the New Century Hymnal as "We Worship You, God" as no. 26.

OLD 104TH (10.10.11.11)

1. O wor-ship thy God, all glor-ious a-bove,
and grate-ful-ly sing that pow-er and love;
Our shield and de-fend-er, the An-cient of Days,
pa-vil-ioned in splen-dor, and gird-ed with praise.


2. O tell of that might, and sing of that grace,
whose robe is the light, whose ca-no-py space,
whose char-iots of jus-tice deep thun-der-clouds form,
and dim is the path on the wings of the storm.


3. The earth with its store of won-ders un-told,
al-migh-ty, thy power hath found-ed of old;
Es-tab-lished it fast by a change-less de-cree,
and round it hath cast, like a man-tle, the sea.

4. Thy boun-ti-ful care, what tongue can re-cite?
It breathes in the air, it shines in the light;
It streams from the hills, it des-cends to the plain,
and sweet-ly dis-tills in the dew and the rain.


5. Frail child-ren of dust, and fee-ble as frail,
by thy end-less trust we fear not to fail.
Thy wing with its shelt-er-ing touch does us mend,
for thou art our mak-er, re-deem-er and friend.

Original verses composed by William Kethe (1561) that do not appear in Hymns of the Spirit (1937):

a. My soule praise the Lord, speake good of his Name,
O Lord our great God how doest thou ap-peare,
So pass-ing in glor-ie, that great is thy fame,
Hon-our and maj-es-tie, in thee shine most cleare.

b. His cham-ber beames lie, in the clouds full sure,
Which as his char-iot, are made him to beare.
And there with much swift-ness, his course doth en-dure:
Up-on the wings rid-ing, of winds in the aire.

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March 07, 2005

7R Praise Be to God, the Almighty

Original Title: "Praise to the Lord, the Almighty," Joachim Neander (1680) trans. Catherine Winkworth (1858), LOBE DEN HERREN, 14.14.4.7.8., Straslund Gesangbuch (1665); New Title: "Praise Be to God, the Almighty," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune.

LOBE DEN HERREN (14.14.4.7.8.)

1. Praise be to God, the Al-migh-ty, who rules o'er cre-a-tion!
O my soul praise the One who is our health and sal-va-tion!
Join the great throng, wake harp and psal-ter and song;
Sound forth in glad a-dor-a-tion.

2. Praise be to God, who o'er all things is won-drous-ly reign-ing,
Who, as on eag-le's wings, is us so gent-ly sus-tain-ing!
Have you not seen all that is need-ed has been
Set by a gra-cious or-dain-ing?

3. Praise be to God, who has fear-less-ly, joy-ful-ly, made you;
Health has vouch-safed and, when heed-less-ly fall-ing, has stayed you.
What need or grief ev-er has failed of re-lief?
Wings of true mer-cy have shade you.


4. Praise be to God, who does pros-per your work and de-fend you;
Sure-ly such good-ness and mer-cy here dai-ly at-tend you.
Pon-der a-new what the Al-migh-ty can do,
Who with great love does be-friend you.


5. Praise be to God, who, when tem-pests their war-fare are wag-ing,
Who, when the el-e-ments mad-ly a-round you are rag-ing,
Bids them to cease, turns then their fu-ry to peace,
Whirl-winds and wa-ters as-suag-ing.


6. Praise be to God, O join all in sin-cere de-di-ca-tion;
All that has life and breath, come now in deep con-tem-pla-tion!
Let the A-men sound from all peo-ple a-gain,
Gather-ed in true a-dor-a-tion.

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The hymn is a recasting of Psalm 105, though there are echoes of other many other psalms in the hymn as well. "For as the rain and the snow come down from heaven, and do not return there until they have watered the earth, making it bring forth and sprout, giving seed to the sower and bread to the eater, so shall my word be that goes out from my mouth; it shall not return to me empty, but it shall accomplish that which I purpose, and succeed in the thing for which I sent it," Isaiah 55:10-11 (NRSV).

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The hymn appears with four stanzas as "Praise Be to God, the Almighty," as no. 278 in Singing the Living Tradition, and with four stanzas as well at no. 22 in The New Century Hymnal under the name "Sing Praise to God, Who Has Shaped;" the latter retranslated by Madeleine Forell Marshall.

Thanks to Kurt Werner for suggested changes to verse 6.

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7S Sing Songs to God, the All-loving

Original Title: "Praise to the Lord, the Almighty," Joachim Neander (1680) trans. Catherine Winkworth (1858), LOBE DEN HERREN, 14.14.4.7.8., Straslund Gesangbuch (1665); New Title: "Sing Songs to God, the Almighty," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Neander was pastor of the Reformed Church in Düsseldorf; this constitutes in essence a recasting of Psalm 105, though there are echoes of other many other psalms in the hymn as well. "For as the rain and the snow come down from heaven, and do not return there until they have watered the earth, making it bring forth and sprout, giving seed to the sower and bread to the eater, so shall my word be that goes out from my mouth; it shall not return to me empty, but it shall accomplish that which I purpose, and succeed in the thing for which I sent it," Isaiah 55:10-11 (NRSV). It appears with four stanzas as "Praise Be to God, the Almighty," as no. 278 in Singing the Living Tradition, and with four stanzas as well at no. 22 in The New Century Hymnal under the name "Sing Praise to God, Who Has Shaped;" the latter retranslated by Madeleine Forell Marshall.

LOBE DEN HERREN (14.14.4.7.8.)

1. Sing songs to God, the All-lov-ing, who sus-tains cre-a-tion!
O my soul praise the Life who is our health and sal-va-tion!
Join the great throng, wake harp and psal-ter and song;
Sound forth in glad a-dor-a-tion.

2. Prais-ed be Love, still with all things so won-drous-ly work-ing,
and as on eag-le's wings, is us so gent-ly up-lift-ing!
Have you not seen all that Earth need-ed has been
moved by Life's gra-cious or-dain-ing?

3. Re-mem-ber Truth, that has fear-less-ly, joy-ful-ly, freed you;
Chains has reclaimed and, when heed-less-ly fall-ing, has stayed you.
What need or grief ev-er has failed of re-lief?
Wings of true mer-cy have shade you.


4. Sing now God's praise, who does pros-per your work and de-fend you;
Life's com-mon mi-ra-cles dai-ly with mer-cy at-tend you.
Pon-der a-new what the Al-migh-ty can do,
who with great love does be-friend you.


5. Thanks now to Peace, when the tem-pests their war-fare are wag-ing,
and when the el-e-ments mad-ly a-round you are rag-ing,
bids them to cease, turns then their fu-ry to ease,
whirl-winds and wa-ters as-suag-ing.


6. Praise the Di-vine, O join all in one true de-di-ca-tion;
all that has life and breath, come now in deep con-tem-pla-tion!
Let the A-men sound from all peo-ple a-gain,
gather-ed in true a-dor-a-tion.


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See comments in 7R; downloads need to be changed to reflect lyrics in verse 6.

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7T Alma, bendice a Dios

Título: "Alma, bendice a Dios," Joachim Neander, trad. Fritz Fliedner, rev. REH (2006); LOBE DEN HERREN, 14.14.4.7.8., Straslund Gesangbuch (1665), arm. William Sterndale Bennett. Paráfrasis del Salmo 105, pero con toques de otros salmos también. "Porque como desciende de los cielos la lluvia y la nieve, y no vuelve allá, sino que riega la tierra, y la hace germinar y producir, y da semilla al que siembra, y pan al que come, así será mi palabra que sale de mi boca; no volverá a mí vacía, sino que hará lo que yo quiero, y será prosperada en aquello para que la envié," Isaías 55:10-11 (Reina-Valera 1960). No. 21, "Alma, bendice a Dios," en El Himnario (Church Publishing, Inc. 1998), la editorial de la Iglesia Episcopal (Anglicana) en los Estados Unidos; no. 28 en Mil voces para celebrar.

LOBE DEN HERREN (14.14.4.7.8.)

1. Al-ma, ben-di-ce a Dios, a-mor al-to de glo-ria;
de sus mer-ce-des es-té vi-va~en ti la me-mo-ria.
¡Oh, des-per-tad, ar-pa~y sal-ter-io~en-ton-ad
him-nos de~ho-nor y vic-tor-ia.

2. Al-ma, ben-di-ce a Dios, que~a los or-bes go-bier-na,
y te con-du-ce pa-cien-te con ma-no ma-ter-na;
y te guar-dó co-mo me-jor le~ag-ra-dó,
por-que su gra-cia~es e-ter-na.

3. Al-ma, ben-di-ce a Dios, de tu vi-da la fuen-te,
que te cre-ó, y~en sa-lud te sos-tie-ne cle-men-te;
tu de-fen-sor en to-do tran-ce~y do-lor,
su dies-tra~es om-ni-po-ten-te.

4. Al-ma, ben-di-ce a Dios por su a-mor in-fi-ni-to;
con todo~el pue-blo de Dios su~a-la-ban-za re-pi-to.
¡Dios, mi sa-lud, de to-do bien ple-ni-tud,
se-as por siem-pre ben-di-to! A-mén.

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March 08, 2005

8R Bring, O Morn, Your Music

Original Title: "Bring, O Morn, Thy Music," William Channing Gannett (1893), NICAEA, John Bacchus Dykes (1861); New Title: "Bring, O Morn, Your Music," rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. William Channing Gannett, born in Boston, served Unity Church (Unitarian) in St. Paul, and the Unitarian Church in Rochester, where Susan B. Anthony was amongst his congregants. The last line of each verse echoes Revelations 1:8 (which see), but the hymn as a whole personifies and praises nature, bordering on panentheism (although the lyrics textually have nature worshiping God as well, as "Our Creator" and "Mighty Giver"). See also Wisdom of Solomon 1:13-14, "God did not make death, and he does not delight in the death of the living. For he created all things that they might exist." Gannett wrote the hymn as a summary of the 1893 World Parliament of Religions in Chicago. It appears in Singing the Living Tradition as "Bring, O Morn, Thy Music, as no. 39, but does not appear in The New Century Hymnal. This version of NICAEA is in F-sharp, although NICAEA in Hymns of the Spirit Two is in E-flat. See No. 17R herein for a version of NICAEA in E-flat.

NICAEA (12.13.12.10.)

1. Bring, O Morn, your mus-ic! Night,~your star-lit si-lence!
O-ceans, laugh the rap-ture to the storm winds cours-ing free!
Suns and pla-nets cho-rus: you are our Cre-a-tor,
who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be!

2. Life and death, your crea-tures, praise~you, Migh-ty Gi-ver!
Praise and prayer are ris-ing in your beast and bird and tree:
Lo! they praise and van-ish, van-ish at your bidd-ing,
who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be!


3. Light us! lead us! love us! cry~your grop-ing na-tions,
speak-ing in a thou-sand tongues, your name a-lone the plea;
weav-ing free-ly out your ho-ly, hap-py pur-pose,
who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be!


4. Life nor death can part us, you~O Love E-ter-nal,
shep-herd of the wan-dering star and souls that way-ward flee!
Home-ward draws the spir-it to your spir-it yearn-ing,
who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be! A-men.

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8S Desde a aurora

Title: "Desde a aurora," William Channing Gannett (1893), Portuguese translation, Daniel Borges (2005), NICAEA, John Bacchus Dykes (1861). Daniel Borges, born in 1959, attends a Baptist church in São Paulo, Brazil. He has translated a number of English-language hymns into Portuguese, and appears to have composed new hymns as well. This is a translation of "Bring, O Morn, Thy Music," described in detail in the entry under 8R. It may be the only extant Portuguese-language translation (or adaptation) of a Unitarian or Universalist hymn.

NICAEA (12.13.12.10.)

1. Des-de a au-ro-ra à noi-te es-tre-la-da!
Jor-ra do rio a á-gua e ven-tos de a-mor!
Os pla-ne-tas can-tam Tuas ma-ra-vi-lhas,
Foi, É e sem-pre se-rá o Sal-va-dor!

2. A vi-da e a mor-te a Ti re-fle-tem!
Lou-vor e o-ra-ção pe-la Tua per-mis-são;
Tu-do o que e-xis-te foi por Ti cri-a-do
E a nós deu Sua e-ter-na Sal-va-ção!

3. An-da-mos no es-cu-ro, gui-e-nos oh! Je-sus,
Em to-da e qual-quer lín-gua te da-mos lou-vor,
Ce-ga-men-te e bem fe-liz se-gui-mos,
Foi, É e sem-pre se-rá o Cri-a-dor!

4. Es-tar se-pa-ra-dos! Nem pe-la mor-te,
Pa-ra to-das as al-mas er-ran-tes, és Pas-tor!
Com o Ce-les-tial Lar es-ta-mos a so-nhar,
Fui, sou e sem-pre se-rei so-nha-dor!

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March 09, 2005

9R Our God, Our God, Thou Shinest Here

Original Title: "Our God, Our God, Thou Shinest Here," Thomas Hornblower Gil (1846), CORONATION, 8.6.8.6.8.6., Oliver Holden (1793); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), MORNING SONG, 8.6.8.6.8.6., at­trib­ut­ed to Elkan­ah K. Dare (1782-1826), arranged by C. W. Douglas. Thomas Hornblower Gil was a lay English Unitarian hymn writer, who later joined the Congregational Church. He wrote nearly 200 hymns, and had definitive ideas about what a hymn should be: "Hymns are not meant to be theological statements, expositions of doctrine, or enunciations of precepts; they are utterances of the soul in its manifold moods of hope and fear, joy and sorrow, love, wonder, and aspiration. ... Hymns are meant and made to be sung. The best and most glorious hymns cannot be more exactly defined than as divine love songs." The lyrics here seem to speak of the Gospel of John: "The true light, which enlightens everyone, was coming into the world." John 1:9. "[John] came as a witness to testify to the light." John 1:7a. The hymn does not appear in either Singing the Living Tradition or in The New Century Hymnal.

MORNING SONG (8.6.8.6.8.6.)

1. Our God, our God, thou shin-est here,
thine own this lat-ter day.
To us thy ra-diant steps ap-pear,
here goes thy glo-rious way!
To us thy ra-diant steps ap-pear,
here goes thy glo-rious way!

2. We shine not on-ly with the light
thou shed-dest down of yore.
On us thou stream-est strong and bright,
thy com-ings are not o'er.
On us thou stream-est strong and bright,
thy com-ings are not o'er.

3. All op-en to our souls shall be
thy glo-ry's hi-ding-place.
Our mo-thers had not all of thee,
new births are in thy grace;
Our fa-thers had not all of thee,
new births are in thy grace.

4. Thou come-est here, thou stand-est by,
our work be-gins to shine.
Thou dwell-est with us migh-ti-ly,
on comes the years di-vine!
Thou dwell-est with us migh-ti-ly,
on comes the years di-vine!

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March 10, 2005

10R Ruler and Power On High

Original Title: "Come, Thou Almighty King," Anonymous (before 1757), ITALIAN HYMN, 6.6.4.6.6.6.4., Felice Giardini (1769); New Title: "Ruler and Power on High," rev. REH (2007), same hymn tune. The hymn first appeared in George Whitefield's Collection of Hymns for Social Worship (1757); some attribute the hymn to Charles Wesley. The tune ITALIAN HYMN was written specifically for the hymn. "God reigneth over the nations; God sitteth upon the throne of his holiness." Psalm 47:8; see also Revelation 19:6, Isaiah 52:7. "Wisdom has built her house . . .She has sent out her servant-girls, she calls from the highest places in the town," Proverbs 9:1-3. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but it does appear in The New Century Hymnal as "Come Now, Almighty God," as no. 275.

ITALIAN HYMN (6.6.4.6.6.6.4.)

1. Rul-er and power on high,
to you our prais-es fly;
Your name we raise,
Fa-ther all-glo-ri-ous,
Mo-ther vic-to-ri-ous,
come and reign o-ver us,
An-cient of Days.

2. Come now all-gra-cious Lord,
by heaven and earth a-dored;
our prayer at-tend;
Wis-dom, your chil-dren bless,
give your good word suc-cess;
Make your own ho-li-ness
on us des-cend.

3. Ne-ver from us de-part,
but rule in ev-ery heart;
hence, e-ver-more.
Your sove-reign ma-jes-ty
may we in glo-ry see,
and to e-ter-ni-ty,
love and a-dore. A-men.

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March 11, 2005

11R Our Mothering Father

Original Title: "Our Father, Unto Thee," Byron G. Russell, OLIVET, 6.6.4.6.6.6.4., New Title, "Our Mothering Father," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Russell was a 19th century Universalist minister, born in 1850. The hymn in some respects represents a reworking of the Lord's Prayer, Matthew 6:9-13, Luke 11:2-4. The hymn appears in neither Hymns of the Spirit Two nor in The New Century Hymnal. "Mothering" in the revised hymn title is a translation of what is normally translated from the Hebrew as "merciful," or literally "womb-like." The phrase occurs in a number of hymns in the various versions of Music For Liturgy and other elements of worship produced by St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church (typically for unrestricted local reproduction) in San Francisco, California.

OLIVET (6.6.4.6.6.6.4.)

1. Our Mothe-ring Fa-ther be
with us now joy-ous-ly,
as voi-ces raise
for all your love has wrought,
our lives with bless-ings fraught
trans-cend-ing all our thought,
we speak your praise.

2. O God, no lips a-lone
could our joy-ful-ness own,
and wor-ship you,
but may our lives ex-press
that which our hearts con-fess,
and we in ho-li-ness
our souls re-new.


3. And may our hands reach out
to those who round a-bout
de-mand our love.
In ev-ery hour of need
may we their plead-ings heed,
til earth be-comes in-deed
like heaven a-bove. A-men.


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March 12, 2005

12R We Lift Our Hearts In Thanks Today

Original Title: "We Lift Our Hearts in Thanks Today," Percival Chubb (1860-1960), PRAETORIUS, C.M., Harmoniae Hymnorum Scholae Gorlicensis (1599); New Title: Same hymn title, ELLACOMBE, 7.6.7.6. D, Gesangbuch der Herzogl W. k. Hofkapelle (Wurttemberg 1784). Percival Chubb was an English Ethical Culturist who later moved to the United States. The hymn appears as no. 355 in Singing the Living Tradition, but does not appear in The New Century Hymnal.

ELLACOMBE (7.6.7.6. D).

1. We lift our hearts in thanks~to-day
for all the gifts of life;
And, first, for peace that turns~a-way
the en-mi-ties of strife.
And, next, the beau-ty of~the earth
its flowers and love-ly things,
the spring's great mir-a-cle~of birth
with sound of songs and wings.

2. Then, har-vests of its teem~ing soil
in or-chard, croft and field;
But, more, the ser-vice and~the toil
of those who helped them yield.
And, most, the gifts of hope~and love,
of wis-dom, truth and right,
the gifts that shine like stars~a-bove
to chart the world by night.

3. As we re-ceive, so let~us give
with rea-dy, gene-rous hand;
rich fruit-age from the lives~we live
to bless our home and land.
We lift our hearts in thanks~to-day
for all the gifts of life;
And e'er for peace that turns~a-way
the en-mi-ties of strife.

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March 13, 2005

13R Rejoice, You Pure In Heart

Original Title: "Rejoice, Ye Pure in Heart," Edward Hayes Pulmptre (1865), MARION, 6.6.8.6.4.6., Arthur Henry Messiter (1883); New Title: "Rejoice You Pure in Heart," rev. REH (2006), ICH HALTE TREULICH STILL, S.M.D., attributed to Bach (1736). The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but does appear in revised form as "Rejoice, You Pure in Heart," as no. 55 to MARION and as no. 71 to VINEYARD HAVEN in The New Century Hymnal. Pulmptre was a 19th century English Anglican. One hears Psalm 20 in lyrics about the "festal banner," the first line of Psalm 147 in the refrain, and Phillipians 4:4 in the title line and the refrain, "Rejoice . . . rejoice."

ICH HALTE TREULICH STILL (S.M.D.)

1. Re-joice, you pure in heart,
re-joice give thanks and sing;
your fes-tal ban-ner wave on high--
the cross of Christ rais-ing.

Refrain.
Re-joice, give thanks and sing; Re-joice, give thanks and sing;
Re-joice, re-joice, re-joice, and sing; Re-joice, give thanks and sing!

2. With all the an-gel choirs,
with all the saints of earth,
pour out the strains of joy and bliss,
true rap-ture, nob-lest mirth. Refrain.


3. Your clear ho-san-nas raise;
And al-le-lu-ias loud;
While an-swer-ing ech-oes up-ward float,
like wreaths of incense cloud. Refrain.

4. With voice as full and strong
as o-cean’s surg-ing praise,
send forth the hymns an-ces-tors loved,
the psalms of an-cient days. Refrain.

5. At last the toil shall end,
the wear-ied ones shall rest,
the pil-grims find the ho-ly home,
where saints are tru-ly blest. Refrain.

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March 14, 2005

14R Unto Thy Temple, Lord, We Come

Original Title: "Unto Thy Temple, Lord, We Come," Robert Collyer (1873), DUKE STREET, L.M., John Hatton (1793), New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (verse 5), same hymn tune. Coll­yer was born in England and later moved to the United States; he first served Methodist churches, then Unitarian congregations. He wrote this hymn for the ded­i­ca­tion of Un­i­ty Church (Unitarian) in Chi­ca­go. He became the first pastor of that church in 1859. "I will open rivers in high places, and fountains in the midst of the valleys," Isaiah 41:18, see also Isaiah 43:20. "Where two or more are gathered in my name, there I am." Matthew 18:20. The hymn under the same name appears with verses 1, 2 and 4 in Singing the Living Tradition; it does not appear in The New Century Hymnal.

DUKE STREET (L.M.)

1. Un-to thy tem-ple, Lord, we come
with thank-ful hearts to wor-ship thee;
And pray that this may be our home
un-til we touch e-ter-ni-ty.

2. The com-mon home of rich and poor,
of bond and free, and great and small;
large as thy love for-ev-er more,
and warm and bright and good to all.

3. And dwell thou with us in this place,
thou and thy Christ, to guide and bless!
Here make the well-spring of thy grace
like foun-tains in the wil-der-ness.


4. May thy whole truth be spo-ken here;
Thy gos-pel light for-ev-er shine;
Thy per-fect love cast out all fear,
and hu-man life be-come di-vine.


5. Mo-ther-ing Spir-it gath-'ring all,
thy gen-tle arms do us em-brace;
O Womb of time, life heeds thy call;
Thy frame holds strong this ho-ly space.

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March 15, 2005

15R O God to Whom in Ancient Time

Original Title: "O Thou to Whom in Ancient Time," John Pierpont (1824), LUTON, L.M., George Burder (1760); New Title: "O God to Whom in Ancient Time," rev. REH (2005), ST. BARTHOLOMEW, L.M., Ed­ward H. Thorne, Se­lect­ion of Psalm and Hymn Tunes (1858). A Unitarian, Pierpont wrote this hymn for the dedication of the 1824 dedication of the In­de­pend­ent Con­gre­ga­tion­al Church in Bar­ton Square, Sa­lem, Mass­a­chu­setts. "[W]orship the Father in spirit and in truth," John 4:23. "Praise Him with the Lute and Harp," Psalm 150:3b. Genesis 26:15-18, Isaac re-digs Abraham's wells. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

ST. BARTHOLOMEW (L.M.)

1. O God to whom, in an-cient time,
the lyre of He-brews' bards was strung,
whom roy-als praised in song sub-lime,
and pro-phets praised with glow-ing tongue.

2. Not now in Zi-on's height a-lone
the fa-vored wor-ship-er may dwell,
nor where, at sul-try noon, thine own
sat wea-ry by the el-ders' well.


3. From eve-ry place be-low the skies,
the grate-ful song, the fer-vent prayer,
the in-cense of the heart, may rise
to heaven, and find ac-cep-tance there.

4. O God to whom, in an-cient time,
the lyre of pro-phet bards was strung,
to whom at last in ev-ery clime,
shall tem-ples rise and praise be sung!

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March 16, 2005

16R Bearer of Being

Original Title: "Lord of All Being," Oliver Wendell Holmes (1859), TRANSYLVANIA, Hungarian chorale (16th Century); New Title: "Bearer of Being," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. The hymn appears in neither The New Century Hymnal nor in Singing the Living Tradition. Holmes, a 19th century Unitarian from Massachusetts, taught at Har­vard, was a writer, father of Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., and founder of Atlantic Magazine, where the lyrics of this hymn first appeared. "There before was a throne." Revelation 4:2; see also Psalm 103:19. Ephesians 4:25, 5:2, "Let all of us speak the truth to our neighbors . . . and live in love."

TRANSYLVANIA (L.M.)

1. Bear-er of be-ing, throned a-far,
Thy glo-ry flames from sun and star;
Cen-ter and soul of ev-ery sphere,
Yet to each lo-ving heart how near!

2. Sun of our life, thy quick-ening ray,
Sheds on our path the glow of day;
Star of our hope, thy soft-ened light,
Cheers the long watch-es of the night.

3. Our mid-night is thy smile with-drawn;
Our noon-tide is thy gra-cious dawn;
Our rain-bow arch, thy mer-cy’s sign;
All, save the clouds of sin, are thine.

4. Life of all life, be-low, a-bove,
Whose light is truth, whose warmth is love,
Be-fore thy ev-er blaz-ing throne:
We ask no lus-ter of our own.

5. Grant us thy truth to make us free,
And kind-ling hearts that burn for thee,
Till all thy liv-ing al-tars claim
One ho-ly light, one heaven-ly flame. A-men.

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March 17, 2005

17R Holy, Holy, Holy

Original Title: "Holy, Holy, Holy, (Lord God Almighty)," Reginald Heber (arr.)(1826), NICAEA, 11.12.12.10, John Bacchus Dykes (1861); New Title: "Holy, Holy, Holy," arr., same hymn tune. Heber was an Anglican bishop, and the hymn tune name, NICAEA, gives a clue as to the trinitarian impulses of his original words. Unitarians have rearranged his words, omitting references to the Trinity, since at least 1848. Even the 1917 Universalist hymnal, Hymns of the Church, includes, as does Hymns of the Spirit Two, only three verses of Heber's original, with no trinitarian references. Singing the Living Tradition recasts the same three verses as no. 26, "Holy, Holy, Holy, (Author of Creation)," while The New Century Hymnal in four verses gives us "Holy, Holy, Holy, (God the Almighty). The verse regarding "cherubim and seraphim," excised from Unitarian and Universalist hymnody for centuries now, has been restored here. "Holy, holy, holy," are words addressed above in Isaiah 6:3, Revelation 4:8, and in communion prayers in many settings.

NICAEA (11.12.12.10)

1. Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly! O God Al-migh-ty!
Ear-ly in the morn-ing our song shall rise to thee;
Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly, mer-ci-ful and migh-ty!
Per-fect in power, in love, and pu-ri-ty.

2. Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly! All the saints a-dore thee,
Cast-ing down their gol-den crowns a-round the glass-y sea;
Che-rub-im and se~raph-im fall-ing down be-fore thee,
Who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be.

3. Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly! though the night-fall hide thee,
hin-dered by our va-ni-ties we have not eyes to see;
On-ly thou art ho-ly; there is none be-side thee,
Per-fect in power, in love, and pu-ri-ty!

4. Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly! O God Al-migh-ty!
All thy works shall praise thy name, in earth, and sky, and sea;
Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly; mer-ci-ful and migh-ty!
Who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be.

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17S ¡Santa, santa, santa!

Título original: "¡Santo, santo, santo!," Reginald Heber (1826), trad. Juan B. Cabrera, NICAEA, 13.12.13.12., John B. Dykes (1861); Título nuevo: "¡Santa, santa, santa!," rev. REH (2006), la misma tonada. No. 24 en El Himnario; no. 4 en Mil voces para celebrar. NICAEA here is in F-sharp, as it is in El Himnario, not E-flat, as it is in Hymns of the Spirit Two.

NICAEA (13.12.13.12.)

1. ¡San-ta, san-ta, san-ta! Fuer-za re-den-to-ra,
siem-pre~el la-bio mí-o lo-or-es te da-rá,
¡San-ta, san-ta, san-ta! Tú, Sa-bi-du-rí-a,
an-te ti que~has si-do, que er-es y se-rás.


2. ¡San-ta, san-ta, san-ta! Aun-que~es-tés ve-la-da
e~im-po-si-ble se-a tu glo-ria~a con-tem-plar,
san-ta tú~er-es só-lo, san-ta~y ex-al-ta-da,
en po-der per-fec-to, pu-re-za~y ca-ri-dad.

3. ¡San-ta, san-ta, san-ta! La gran mu-che-dum-bre
de~án-ge-les que cum-plen la san-ta vo-lun-tad.
¡San-ta, san-ta, san-ta! El mun-do te~a-do-re,
Tú de mu-chos nom-bres, ben-di-ta U-ni-dad.

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March 18, 2005

18R O Friend, You Are Calling

Original Title: "Father, Thou Art Calling," James Vila Blake (1880), BROMLEY COMMON, 12.13.12.10, Martin Shaw (1915) (alternative tune: NICAEA, Irregular, John Bacchus Dykes (1861)); New Title: "O Friend, You Are Calling," rev. REH (2006), NICAEA. The revised lyrics do not banish "Father," which one still finds in the body of the hymn. The holy is in addition addressed, however, as "Lady Wisdom." James Vila Blake was an American Unitarian. Neither Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal contains it. "The voice of the Lord is over the waters; the God of glory thunders, the Lord, over many waters." Psalm 29:3; see also Job 38:1-41.

NICAEA (Irregular)

1. O Friend, you are call-ing, call-ing to us plain-ly,
to the spir-it comes your lov-ing mes-sage ev-er-more;
Ho-ly One up-lift us, nor for-ev-er vain-ly, stand call-ing us
and wait-ing at the door.

2. In the whirl-ing tem-pest, and the storm you've lived in,
in the rain, and in the sweet-ness of the af-ter-glow;
sum-mer's gold-en boun-ty, win-ter's snow you've giv-en,
and bloom-ing mea-dows where sweet wat-ers flow.


3. Clear-er still and dear-er is your voice ap-peal-ing,
deep with-in the spir-it's se-cret be-ing speak-ing low.
En-ter La-dy Wis-dom, now the truth re-veal-ing:
From all van-i-ty free us as we go.

4. In you, liv-ing, mov-ing, un-to you up-lift-ing
all your joy-ous, hope-ful trust that gives our
hearts re-pose; Fa-ther, we a-dore you, ask-ing naught
nor fear-ing; Far we wan-der not from your Soul of souls. A-men.

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March 19, 2005

19R How Lovely Is Your Dwelling Place

Original Title: "How Lovely Are Thy Dwellings Fair," John Milton (1645), CAITHNESS, C.M., Melody in Scottish Psalter (1635); New Title: "How Lovely Is Your Dwelling Place," rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Milton was an English Puritan (Congregationalist) and poet, best known for Paradise Lost. The hymn is a recast of Psalm 84. It does not appear in either Singing the Living Tradition or The New Century Hymnal.

CAITHNESS (C.M.)

1. How love-ly is your dwell-ing place,
O God of heaven; how dear
the pleas-ant ta-ber-na-cles' space
where you do dwell so near!

2. The spar-rows have long sought to fly
sky-ward, and your courts view;
the swal-lows in their nests still cry,
O Ho-ly One, for you.

3. Hap-py, who in your house re-side,
where they to you sing praise!
Hap-py, whose strength with you do side,
and in their hearts your ways!

4. They jour-ney on from strength to strength
with joy and glad-some cheer,
till all be-fore our God at length
in Zi-on does ap-pear.

5. O God of heaven that reigns on high,
that we are tru-ly blest
who tru-ly on you do re-ly,
and in you tru-ly rest. A-men
.

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March 20, 2005

20R As Pants the Hart for Cooling Streams

Original Title: "As Pants the Hart for Coolings Streams," Nahum Tate and Nicholas Brady (1696), MARTYRDOM, C.M., Hugh Wilson, arr. R. A. Smith (1825); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but does appear as no. 481 in The New Century Hymnal. The hymn is a recast of Psalm 42.

MARTYRDOM (C.M.)

1. As pants the hart* for cool-ing streams,
when heat-ed in the chase,
so longs my soul, O God, for you
and your re-fresh-ing grace.

2. Why rest-less, why cast down, my soul?
Hope still; and you shall sing
the praise of one who is your God,
your health's e-ter-nal spring.

3. Deep calls to deep, and o-ceans roar;
For God my soul does pine;
O when shall I be-hold your face,
O ma-jes-ty di-vine?

4. Why rest-less, why cast down, my soul?
Trust God who will em-ploy
all aid for you and change these sighs
to thank-ful hymns of joy. A-men


* deer

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March 21, 2005

21R Great God, the Followers of Your Child

Original Title: "Great God, the Followers of Thy Son," Henry Ware, Jr. (1819), HEBRON, L.M., Lowell Mason (1830); New Title: "Great God, the Followers of Your Child," rev. REH (2006), SEWALL, L.M., Frank Sew­all, The Magnificat (New York 1910). Henry Ware, Jr., was a Unitarian minister, and pastor of Second Church in Boston; Sewall was pastor of the Swedenborgian National Church in Washington, D.C. "God's feet," Exodus 24:10; "The truth will set you free," John 8:32. John 3:21, "[W]ho lives by the truth will come to the light." Mark 10:52 (NRSV), "Jesus said to him,, 'Go; your faith has made you well.' Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way." "When they had brought their boats to shore, they left everything and followed him," Luke 5:11 (NRSV). The hymn appears neither in The New Century Hymnal nor in Singing the Living Tradition.

SEWALL (L.M.)

1. Great God, the fol-lowers of your child,
we bow be-fore your ho-ly seat,
to wor-ship you, O Mer-cy Mild,
and pour our wish-es at your feet.


2. O grant your bless-ings here to-day!
O give your peo-ple joy and peace!
The to-kens of your love dis-play,
and fa-vor that shall ne-ver cease.


3. We seek the truth that Je-sus brought;
the path of light we long to tread;
here are the ho-ly teach-ings taught;
and their pur-est in-flu-ence shed.

4. May faith and hope and love a-bound;
ev-ils and er-rors be for-given;
and all on your great day be found
child-ren of God and heirs of heaven!

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4. ...

May faith and hope and love abound;
Our sins and errors be forgiven;

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March 22, 2005

22R In This Peaceful House of Prayer

Original Title: "In This Peaceful House of Prayer," from Hymns of the Spirit One (1864), SONG 13, 7.7.7.7., Orlando Gibbons, adapted (1623); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), CALVARY (MONK), 7.7.7.7., William Henry Monk (1875). Monk edited Hymns Ancient and Modern, which has sold over 60 million copies. The lyrics appear in the first Hymns of the Spirit, edited by Samuel Longfellow in 1864. It does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. "God's feet," Exodus 24:10. "The heavens, even the highest heaven, cannot contain you. How much less this temple I have built!" 1 Kings 8:27. "Where is the House you will build me?" Isaiah 66:1. "Mothering" in the lyrics is a translation of what is normally translated from the Hebrew as "merciful," or literally "womb-like." The phrase occurs in a number of hymns in the various versions of Music For Liturgy and other elements of worship produced by St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church (typically for unrestricted local reproduction) in San Francisco, California.

CALVARY (MONK) (7.7.7.7.)

1. In this peace-ful house of prayer,
strong-er faith, O God, we seek;
Here we bring each earth-ly care,
you, the strength'-ning mes-sage speak!

2. In our great-est tri-als, we calm,
through you, the way have trod;
In the small-est, may we feel
you are still our hel-per, God.

3. Of your pres-ence and your love,
we more stead-fast feel-ing need,
Till the high and ho-ly thought
hal-low ev-ery sim-ple deed.


4. Mothe-ring Fa-ther, at your feet,
we would lay our earth-born care;
Help us in our need, for you know
the weight that each must bear.

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March 23, 2005

23R Enter In the Holy Temple

Original Title: "God Is In His Holy Temple," from Hymns of the Spirit One (1864), edited by Samuel Longfellow, STUTTGART, 8.7.8.7., Chrisitian Friedrich Witt, adapted (1715)(alternatively AUTUMN, 8.7.8.7., published by Françoise Barthélémon (before 1793)); New Title: "Enter In the Holy Temple," rev. REH (2006), PORTSEA, William Boyce, A Collection of Melodies for the Psalms of David According to the Version of Christopher Smart A.M. ­(circa 1765). The lyrics echo Psalm 122. The hymn appears neither in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

PORTSEA (8.7.8.7.)

1. En-ter in the ho-ly tem-ple,
earth-ly thoughts be si-lent now,
while in rev-erence we as-sem-ble,
and be-fore the Pre-sence bow.

2. O Love is with us for-ev-er,
when we call up-on the Name,
aid-ing ev-ery good en-deav-or,
guid-ing ev-ery up-ward aim.

3. God is in the ho-ly tem-ple,
in the pure and ho-ly mind,
in the reve-rent heart and sim-ple,
in the soul from sense re-fined.

4. Then let ev-ery low e-mo-tion
ban-ished far and sil-ent be,
and our souls in pure de-vo-tion,
Sove-reign, wor-thy tem-ples be!


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April 02, 2005

25R Sovereign and Transforming Grace

Original Title: "Sovereign and Transforming Grace," Frederic Henry Hedge (1829), ORIENTIS PARTIBUS, 7.7.7.7., Pierre de Corbeil (died 1222) (second tune GOTTSHALK, 7.7.7.7., (adapted from Louis Moreau Gottshalk)); New Title: Same hymn name, rev. REH (2005), ORIENTIS PARTIBUS. Hedge served as the President of the American Unitarian Association, and edited the 1853 Unitarian hymnal, Hymns for the Church of Christ (Boston). He wrote this hymn for the ordination of a friend. "[J]ust as sin exercised dominion in death, so grace might also exercise dominion . . . leading to eternal life," Romans 5:21. "Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your minds, so that you may discern what is the will of God." Romans 12:2. The hymn appears in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 33 and in The New Century Hymnal as no. 512, both to the tune MANTON.

ORIENTIS PARTIBUS (7.7.7.7.)

1. Sove-reign and trans-form-ing grace,
we in-voke your quick-ening light;
Reign the spir-it of this place,
bless the pur-pose of this hour.

2. Ho-ly and cre-a-tive light,
we in-voke your kind-ling ray;
Dawn up-on our spir-its' night,
as the dark-ness turns to day.


3. To the anx-ious soul im-part
hope, all o-ther hopes a-bove;
Stir the dull and hard-ened heart
with a long-ing and a love.

4. Work in all; In all re-new
day by day the life di-vine.
All our wills to you sub-due,
all our hearts to you in-cline. A-men


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April 03, 2005

26R O Source Divine and Life of All

Original Title: "O Source Divine and Life of All," John Sterling (1839), SONG 34 (GIBBONS), L.M., Orlando Gibbons, Rhythm altered (1623); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. The version of SONG 34 here differs slightly from the version of the tune that appears in Hymns of the Spirit Two. Sterling was born on the Isle of Bute, in Scotland. "For with thee is the fountain of life: in thy light shall we see light. O continue thy lovingkindness unto them that know thee; and thy righteousness to the upright in heart." Psalm 36:10-11 (KJV). The hymn appears neither in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. This is particularly notable given the line in the third stanza, "through the ceaseless web to trace," words so redolent of the so-called "Seventh Principle" of the Unitarian Universalist Association's Principles and Purposes.

SONG 34 (GIBBONS)

1. O Source di-vine, and Life of all,
the Fount of be-ing’s won-drous sea!
Thy depth does ev-ery heart e'er call
that we may see love's dream in thee.

2. We shrink be-fore thy vast a-byss,
where worlds on worlds e-ter-nal brood.
We know thee tru-ly but in this--
That thou be-stow-est all our good.

3. And so, mid bound-less time and space,
O grant us still in thee to dwell,
and through the cease-less web to trace
thy pre-sence work-ing all things well.


4. Nor let thou life’s de-light-ful play
thy truth’s trans-cend-ent vi-sion hide;
Nor strength and glad-ness lead a-stray
from thee, our na-ture’s on-ly guide.

5. Be-stow on all our joy-ous thrills
thy deep-er tones of reve-rent awe:
Make free thy child-ren’s world-ly wills,
and in-cline hearts toward hol-ier law.

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April 04, 2005

27R Where Ancient Forests Round Us Spread

Original Title: "Where Ancient Forests Widely Spread," Andrews Norton (1833), WAINWRIGHT, L.M., Richard Wainwright; New Title: "Where Ancient Forests Round Us Spread," rev. REH (2005), AGINCOURT (DEO GRATIAS), Traditional English Melody (1415). Andrews Norton, an American Unitarian, is famous for having said that Ralph Waldo Emerson’s [Harvard] Divinity School Address represented "the newest form of infidelity." As beloved a figure as Emerson is for many, Norton's provocation takes nothing away from his own place in Unitarian Universalist hymnody. The full form of the hymn was anthologized in 1900 by Edmund Clarence Stedman (1833-1908) in his An American Anthology 1787-1900, as no. 51, where it is called "Hymn for the Dedication of a Church." In that collection, it began "Where ancient forests round us spread," as does the revised version here. Compare 2 Kings 19:22-24. Genesis 28:17, "How awesome is this place! This is none other than the house of God; this is the gate of heaven." The Universe is filled by God, in God "we live and move and have our being." Acts 17:28.; see also Psalm 84. "The Lord has blessed the household of Obededom and all that belongs to him, because of the ark of God," 2 Samuel 6:12, suggesting, as in the lyrics, there are places where "human thought burns clearer" given their chosen status. Tradition has it that the AGINCOURT was written to laud the victory of the English at Normandy. The hymn appears in neither Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

AGINCOURT (DEO GRATIAS) (L.M.)

1. Where an-cient for-ests round us spread,
where bends~the cat'-ract's o-cean fall,
on the lone moun-tain's si-lent head,
there are your tem-ples, God of all!

2. Be-neath the dark-blue, mid-night arch,
whence my~riad suns pour down their rays,
where pla-nets trace their cease-less march,
O Life! we praise you as we gaze.

3. All space is ho-ly, for all space
is filled~by you; And hu-man thought
burns clear-er in some chos-en place,
where your own words of love are taught.

4. May we be taught, and may we know
a faith~your ser-vants knew of old
which on-ward bears through weal and woe,
till Death the gates of heaven un-fold.

5. Nor we a-lone, may those whose brow
shows yet~no trace of hu-man cares,
here-aft-er stand where we do now,
and raise to you still hol-ier prayers!


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April 05, 2005

28R God of the Earth, the Sky, the Sea

Original Title: "God of the Earth, the Sky and the Sea," Samuel Longfellow (1864), WINCHESTER NEW, L.M., Hamburger Musikalisches Handbuch (1690); New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2005), ST. CATHERINE, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Henri F. Hemy (1865). Psalm 24:1-2, "The earth is the Lord's, and all it contains . . . For He has founded it upon the seas, and established it upon the rivers." Genesis 1:27, "[I]n the image of God . . . male and female [God] created them;" see also Genesis 9:6. "God's likeness," 2 Corinthians 3:18, 1 Corinthians 15:49. The Indwelling God, John 15:4. Proverbs 22:2, "The rich and the poor have this in common: the Lord is the maker of them all." The hymn is not contained in The New Century Hymnal, but is found in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 25, to the tune DUKE STREET, L.M.

ST. CATHERINE (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. God of the earth, the sky, the sea,
Mak-er of all a-bove, be-low,
cre-a-tion lives and moves in thee,
thy pre-sent life in all doth flow.
We give thee thanks, thy name we sing;
O Ho-ly One, our praise we bring!

2. Thy love is in the sun-shine’s glow,
thy life is in the quick-ening air;
When light-ning flash-es and storm winds blow,
there is thy power; thy law is there.
We give thee thanks, thy name we sing;
O Ho-ly One, our praise we bring!

3. We feel thy calm at even-ing’s hour,
thy grand-eur in the march of night;
And when thy morn-ing breaks in power,
we hear thy word, “Let there be light.”
We give thee thanks, thy name we sing;
O Ho-ly One, our praise we bring!

4. But high-er far, and far more clear,
thee in our spir-its we be-hold;
Thine im-age and thy-self are there—
Th’in-dwell-ing God, pro-claimed of old!
We give thee thanks, thy name we sing;
O Ho-ly One, our praise we bring!

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April 06, 2005

29R You Hide Within the Lily

Original Title: "He Hides Within the Lily," William Channing Gannett (1873), MUNICH, 7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6., Meiningen Gesangbuch (1693); New Title: "You Hide Within the Lily," rev. REH (2007), KING'S LYNN, 7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6., Traditional English Melody, arranged Ralph Vaughan Williams (1906). "Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not." Matthew 6:28; see also Luke 12:27. "A mortal ... comes up like a flower." Job 14:1-2. It should be noted, of course, that the Song of Songs (the Song of Solomon) discusses flowers and lilies throughout. Micah 6:8 (KJV), "He hath shewed thee, O man, what is good; and what doth the LORD require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?," see also Proverbs 2:13, Proverbs 11:1, 1 Kings 3:11-12, Ecclesiastes 5:8, Jeremiah 22:15. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

KING'S LYNN (7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6.)

1. You hide with-in the li-ly a strong and ten-der care
that wins the earth-born a-toms to glo-ry of the air;
You weave the shin-ing garm-ents un-ceas-ing-ly and still
a-long the qui-et wa-ters, in ni-ches of the hill.

2. We lin-ger at the vi-gil with one who bent the knee
to watch the an-cient li-lies in dis-tant Gal-i-lee;
And still the wor-ship deep-ens and quick-ens in-to new,
and bright-ening down the a-ges God's se-cret thrills us through.

3. O Toi-ler of the li-ly, with you the heart e'er sings;
No leaf that dawns to pe-tal but hints of an-gel wings.
The flower hor-i-zons o-pen, the blos-som vast-er shows;
We hear your wide worlds e-cho, 'See how the li-ly grows.'


4. The yearn-ings of the na-tions, un-fold-ing, thought by thought,
to hol-ier lives are lift-ed, to vi-sions clear are wrought:
May all ad-vance in jus-tice, while e-vils fade and fall,
till cha-os blooms to beau-ty, your pur-pose crown-ing all.

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April 07, 2005

30R Immortal, Invisible, God Only Wise

Original Title: "Immortal, Invisible, God Only Wise," Walter Chalmers Smith (1876), ST. DENIO, 11.11.11.11., Welsh Melody (1839); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2007), same hymn tune. Smith was Scottish. The tune and hymn appear as "Immortal, Invisible" in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 273, with the exception of the final stanza; it appears here. The hymn appears without parental metaphors in The New Century Hymnal as no. 1. The lyrics resonate with some of the images in Psalm 139, as well as Psalm 36:5-6, 103:14-17, and 104:27-39; but most directly the lyrics are based on 1 Timothy 1:17. The webdesigner graciously thanks Haruo for his assistance with the minor revisions to Smith's lyrics below.

ST. DENIO (11.11.11.11.)

1. Im-mort-al, in-vi-si-ble, God on-ly wise,
in light in-ac-ces-si-ble hid from our eyes,
most bles-sèd, most glo-rious, the An-cient of Days,
Al-migh-ty, vic-tor-ious, thy great Name we praise.

2. Un-rest-ing, un-hast-ing, and si-lent as light,
nor want-ing, nor wast-ing, thou rul-est in might;
thy jus-tice, like moun-tains, high soar-ing a-bove
thy clouds, which are foun-tains of good-ness and love.


3. To all, life thou giv-est, to both great and small;
In all life thou liv-est, the true life of all;
We blos-som and flour-ish as leaves on the tree,
and with-er and per-ish— but naught chang-eth thee.

4. Great Fath-er, Great Moth-er, O Light of all light,
thine an-gels a-dore thee, all veil-ing their sight;
All laud we would rend-er; O help us to see
’tis on-ly the splen-dor of light hid-eth thee.


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April 08, 2005

31R Thou Art O God the Life and Light

Original Title: "Thou Art, O God, the Life and Light," Thomas Moore (1816), MACH'S MIT MIR, GOTT, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Johann Hermann Schein (1645), harmony by J. S. Bach; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), OLD 113TH, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Matthäus Greiter (1500-1552). Thomas Moore was a Roman Catholic and Irish Nationalist. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition or in The New Century Hymnal. "With thee is the fountain of life: in thy light shall we see light," Psalm 36:9. "The flowers appear on the earth; the time of singing has come," The Song of Songs 2:12. "Clouds of heaven," Daniel 7:13, Matthew 26:64, Mark 14:62.

OLD 113TH (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. Thou art, O God, the Life and Light
of all this won-drous world we see;
Its glow by day, its smile by night,
are but re-flec-tions caught from thee;
Wher-e'er we turn, thy glo-ries shine:
all things beau-teous and bright are thine.

2. When day, with fare-well beam, de-lays
a-mong the open-ing clouds of even,
and we can al-most think we gaze
through gold-en vis-tas in-to heaven,
those hues, that make the sun's de-cline
so soft, so ra-diant, God, are thine.

3. When budd-ing spring a-round us breathes
thy spir-it warms a fra-grant sigh,
and eve-ry flower the sum-mer wreathes
is born be-neath that kind-ling eye--
Wher-e'er we turn, thy glo-ries shine:
all things beau-teous and bright are thine.

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April 09, 2005

32R For the Beauty of the Earth

Original Title: "For the Beauty of the Earth," Folliott Sandford Pierpoint (1864), DIX, 7.7.7.7.7.7., Conrad Kocher (1838); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Pierpoint was English and Anglican. Isaiah 6:3b, "The Earth is full of [God's] glory." The hymn appears in The New Century Hymnal as no. 28 with the refrain "God of all;" it appears in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 21 with "Source of all." The original in Hymns of the Spirit Two is "Lord of all" in each verse.

DIX (7.7.7.7.7.7.)

1. For the beau-ty of the earth
for the glo-ry of the skies,
for the love which from our birth
ov-er and a-round us lies.
Light of all, to thee~we raise,
this our hymn of grate~ful praise.

2. For the beau-ty of each hour,
of the day and of the night,
hill and vale, and tree and flower,
sun and moon, and stars of light.
Love of all, to thee~we raise,
this our hymn of grate~ful praise.

3. For the joy of ear and eye,
for the heart and mind’s de-light,
for the mys-tic har-mo-ny
link-ing sense to sound and sight.
Life of all, to thee~we raise,
this, our hymn of grate~ful praise.

4. For the joy of hu-man love,
broth-er, sist-er, pa-rent, child,
friends on earth and friends a-bove,
for all gen-tle thoughts and mild.
Lord of all to thee~we raise,
this, our hymn of grate~ful praise. A-men.


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April 10, 2005

33R The Spacious Firmament On High

Original Title: "The Spacious Firmament On High," Joseph Addison (1712), CREATION, L.M.D., Franz Joseph Haydn (1798); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Paraphrase of Psalm 19:1-6. Addison was English and Anglican. The version of CREATION here is in a different key from the version in Hymns of the Spirit Two. The hymn appears in a version remarkably akin to this in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 283; it does not appear in The New Century Hymnal.

CREATION (L.M.D.)

1. The spa-cious fir-ma-ment on high,
with all the blue e-the-real sky,
and spang-led heavens, a shin-ing frame
their great O-rig-i-nal pro-claim.
Th’un-wea-ried sun, from day to day,
does its Cre-a-tor's power dis-play,
and pub-li-shes to eve-ry land
the work of an al-might-y hand.

2. Soon as the eve-ning shades pre-vail
the moon takes up the won-drous tale,
and night-ly to the liste-ning earth
re-peats the sto-ry of its birth;
While all the stars that round it burn
and all the pla-nets in their turn,
con-firm the ti-dings as they roll,
and spread the truth from pole to pole.

3. What though in sol-emn si-lence all
move round the dim ter-res-trial ball?
What though no re-al voice nor sound
a-mid the ra-diant orbs be found?
In rea-son's ear they all re-joice,
and ut-ter forth a glo-rious voice,
for-ev-er sing-ing as they shine,
"The hand that made us is di-vine."


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April 11, 2005

34R Heaven and Earth and Sea and Air

Original Title: "Heaven and Earth and Sea and Air," Joachim Neander (1680), trans. James Drummond Burns, POSEN, 7.7.7.7., Georg Christoph Strattner (1691); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), GOTT SEI DANK, 7.7.7.7., Johann A. Freylinghausen (1704). Psalm 57:7-11, 108:1-5; see also Psalm 19. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but it does appear in a version translated by Madeleine Forrell Marshall (1993) as no. 566, in five stanzas, also to the tune GOTT SEI DANK, in The New Century Hymnal. For Joachim Neander, see the entry under no. 7R.

GOTT SEI DANK (7.7.7.7.)

1. Heaven and earth, and sea and air,
all their mak-er’s praise de-clare;
Wake, my soul, a-wake and sing:
Now thy grate-ful prais-es bring.

2. See the glo-rious orb of day
break-ing through the clouds a-way;
Moon and stars with sil-very light
sing praise through the si-lent night.

3. O God's love hath eve-ry-where
made this earth so rich and fair;
hill and vale and fruit-ful land,
all life bears a ho-ly hand.

4. God, great won-ders work-est thou!
To thy sway all crea-tures bow;
Write thou deep-ly in my heart
what I am, and what thou art.


a. Him-mel, Er-de, Luft und Meer
zeu-gen von des Schöp-fers Ehr;
mei-ne See-le, sin-ge du,
bring auch jetzt dein Lob her-zu.


b. Seht das gro-ße Sonn-en-licht,
wie es durch die Wol-ken bricht;
auch der Mond, der Ster-ne Pracht
jauch-zen Gott bei still-er Nacht.

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April 12, 2005

35R Let the Whole Creation Cry

Original Title: "Let the Whole Creation Cry," Stopford Augustus Brooke, VIENNA, 7.7.7.7., Justin Heinrich Knecht (1799); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Brooke was a 19th Century Irish writer and churchman, first ordained in the Chruch of England, but later he officiated as a Unitarian minister at Bedford chapel, Bloomsbury. Psalm 148:5, "On the glorious splendor of your majesty,and on your wondrous works, I will meditate." (ESV). Neither Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal contains the hymn. The website maintained by St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church includes a paraphrase of Psalm 148 called "The Furthest Depths of Outer Space" with words by Matthew Priest, to the tune KISSLING, 8.8.6.8.8.6., which may be locally reproduced.

VIENNA (7.7.7.7.)

1. Let the whole cre-a-tion cry:
Glo-ry be to God on high!
Sun and moon, up-lift your voice,
night and stars, in God re-joice!


2. Chant out ho-nor, o-cean fair!
Earth, soft rush-ing through the air!
Sun-shine, dark-ness, cloud and storm,
rain and snow high praise per-form.

3. Let the blos-soms of the earth
join the u-ni-ver-sal mirth;
Birds, with morn and dew e-late,
sing with joy at heav-en's gate.


4. All souls on the side of right,
pro-phets speak-ing words of might;
Po-ets, fight-ers, ar-ti-sans:
Raise the anth-em once a-gain!

5. And let chil-dren's hap-py hearts
in this wor-ship bear their parts:
Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly, cry,
Glo-ry be to God on high!

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April 13, 2005

36R O God Whose Smile Is In the Sky

Original Title: "O God Whose Smile Is In the Sky," John Haynes Holmes (1907), MARTYRDOM, C.M., Hugh Wilson, adapted by H. A. Smith (1825); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. A graduate of Harvard, Holmes first served as minister of the Unitarian Third Congregational Church, Dorchester, Massachusetts. In 1907, he became junior minister at the Church of the Messiah in New York City (now known as the Community Church, Unitarian Universalist). "What a relief it is to see your friendly smile. It is like seeing the smile of God," Genesis 33:10. "May the Lord smile on you and be gracious to you," Numbers 6:25. "Come unto me . . . and I will give you rest," Matthew 11:28. The hymn is not in The New Century Hymnal, nor is it in Singing the Living Tradition.

MARTYRDOM (C.M.)

1. O God, whose smile is in the sky,
whose path is in the sea,
once more from earth’s tu-mul-tuous strife
to you we turn glad-ly.

2. Now all the myr-iad sounds of earth
in so-lemn still-ness die;
while wind and wave u-nite to chant
their an-them to the sky.

3. We come as those with toil far spent
who crave your rest and peace,
and from the care and fret of life
would find in you re-lease.

4. Su-stain-er, soothe all troubl-ed thought,
dis-pel all id-le fear;
O purge each heart of se-cret sin,
and ba-nish ev-ery care.

5. Un-til, as shine up-on the sea
the si-lent stars a-bove,
there shines up-on our trust-ing souls
the light of your own love.

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April 14, 2005

37R Thou Rulest, God, the Lights On High

Original Title: "Thou Rulest, God, the Lights On High," Theodore Chickering Williams (1911), MELCOMBE, L.M., Samuel Webbe (1782); New Title: Same hymn tune, rev. REH (2006), ERHALT UNS, HERR, L.M., Geisliche Lieder (Wittenberg 1543). "[W]isdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, willing to yield, full of mercy." James 3:17. "Does not Wisdom call, and does not understanding raise her voice?" Proverbs 8:1; see also Proverbs 1:20-25. "O Lord, how manifold are your works! In wisdom you have made them all; the earth is full of your creatures," Psalm 104:24. Williams served as pastor of All Souls Church (Unitarian) in New York City for 13 years. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

ERHALT UNS, HERR (L.M.)

1. Thou rul-est, God, the lights on high;
Sun, moon and stars thy ser-vants be.
Yet eve-ry glo-ry of the sky
is bright-er still when I have thee.

2. How vast the mar-vel of the mind,
how far the beams of rea-son go!
Yet all wis-dom of hu-man-kind
burns deep-er still when thee I know.


3. Wher-e'er I look is light and joy:
A bloom-ing flower, an eag-le's wing;
their sin-less ju-bi-lee em-ploy,
and to thy praise full tri-bute bring.

4. Thy gifts to us be-yond com-pare,
like roy-al crowns and em-blems shine;
yet bring us nev-er to des-pair
when we hold these grand gifts as thine.


5. De-light and wis-dom, peace and power,
a heart of hope, se-rene and free,
through life's dim dream and tran-sient hour
I find, O God, tru-ly in thee.


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April 15, 2005

38R The Harp at Nature's Advent Strung

Original Title: "The Harp at Nature's Advent Strung," John Greenleaf Whittier, EVAN, C.M., William Henry Havergal, arranged by Lowell Mason (1850); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), LLANGLOFLAN, 8.6.8.6., Welsh Hymn Melody. Whittier was an anti-slavery Quaker and poet, who was secretary of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Though born in Boston, he lived in Philadelphia where he edited the Pennsylvania Freeman. The complete, original poem, called "The Worship of Nature" contains ten verses, rather than the six below, or the five in Hymns of the Spirit Two and the five in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 74 (It is not contained in The New Century Hymnal). Though anthologized in The Complete Poetical Works of John Greenleaf Whittier, (Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1894), the poem was first published in 1867. "All the earth . . . make music to the Lord with the harp, with the harp and the sound of singing, . . . Let the sea resound, and everything in it, the world, and all who live in it." Psalm 98:4-7 "You have kept the good wine until now," John 2:10, Nehemiah 8:10.

LLANGLOFLAN (8.6.8.6.)

1. The harp at Na-ture's ad-vent strung
has never ceas-ed to play;
the song the stars of morn-ing sung
has ne-ver died a-way.
And prayer is made, and praise is given,
by all things near and far;
the o-cean look-eth up to heaven,
and mirr-ors eve-ry star.

2. Its waves are kneel-ing on the strand,
as kneels the hu-man knee,
their white locks bow-ing to the sand,
the priest-hood of the sea!
The green earth sends its in-cense up
from many a moun-tain shrine;
from fold-ed leaf and de-wy cup
and pours a sacr-ed wine.

3. The blue sky is the tem-ple's arch,
its tran-sept earth and air,
the mu-sic of its star-ry march
the cho-rus of a prayer.
So Na-ture keeps the re-verent frame
with which the years be-gan,
and all the signs and voi-ces shame
the prayer-less heart a-gain.

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April 20, 2005

42R Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee

Original Title: "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee," Henry Van Dyke (1908), JOY, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., arranged from Ludwig van Beethoven; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Van Dyke was an American Presbyterian. The hymn tune is known as HYMN TO JOY in Singing the Living Tradition; no. 29 is a three-verse version of "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee;" no. 327 in the 1993 hymn is entitled "Joy, Thou Goddess," with original German lyrics for two stanzas of "Freude, schöner Götterfunken." The latter hymn, by Friedrich Schiller, constitutes the "original" lyrics insofar as they inspired Beethoven's composition. The New Century Hymnal has four verses (without sibling references) as no. 4, "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore You." See Psalm 145:10, "All your works shall give thanks to you," see also Psalm 71:23; Isaiah 49:13, "Sing for joy, O heavens, and exult, O earth; break forth, O mountains, into singing!"

JOY (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.)

1. Joy-ful, joy-ful, we a-dore thee, God of glo-ry, God of love;
Hearts un-fold like flowers be-fore thee, open-ing to the sun a-bove.
Melt the clouds of sin and sad-ness; drive the dark* of doubt a-way;
Giv-er of im-mort-al glad-ness, fill us with the light of day!


2. All thy works with joy sur-round thee, earth and heaven re-flect thy rays,
stars and an-gels sing a-round thee, cent-er of un-brok-en praise.
Field and for-est, vale and moun-tain, flow-ery mead-ow, flash-ing sea,
sing-ing bird and flow-ing foun-tain call us to re-joice in thee.

3. Thou art giv-ing and for-giv-ing, ev-er bless-ing, ev-er blessed;
Well-spring of the joy of liv-ing, o-cean depth of hap-py rest!
Lov-ing Sove-reign, Moth-er, Fath-er, all who live in love are thine;
teach us how to love each oth-er, lift us to the joy di-vine.

4. Mor-tals, join the hap-py chor-us, which the morn-ing stars beg-an;
Christ our Bro-ther reigns a-mongst us; Sis-ter Wis-dom seals the plan.
Ev-er sing-ing, march we on-ward, vic-tors in the midst of strife,
Joy-ful mus-ic leads us sun-ward in the tri-umph song of life.

*or 'storms'

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May 01, 2005

50R Love Divine, All Loves Excelling

Original Title: "Love Divine, All Loves Excelling," Charles Wesley (1747), first tune, HYFRYDOL, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., Rowland Hugh Pritchard (1855), second tune, BEECHER, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., John Zundel (1870); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), HYFRYDOL, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7. The hymn first appeared in Hymns For Those That Seek, and Those That Have Redemption (1747). Charles Wesley, father of the Methodist movement, who wrote over 6,500 hymns, is said to have been inspired by the song "The Song of Venus" from John Dryden's play King Arthur. The hymn originally had four verses, and suggested that one could be completely cleansed of sin in this life. This prompted Charles' brother John Wesley to change the lyrics. It appeared with two verses only in Hymns of the Spirit Two (1937). In that version, "Jesus, thou art all compassion," became "Father, thou art all compassion." Here "Wisdom" has been substituted; see 50S for a version in which "Jesus" has been restored. Below, as in 50S, lines from the original third and fourth verses have been combined to create a third verse. Charles Wesley himself might rank "Wisdom" at least over "Father" as here, explaining in his Notes on Proverbs that "Christ, under the name of Wisdom, invites us to his entertainment;" i.e., "Wisdom has built her house, she has hewn her seven pillars . . . 'Come, eat of my bread, and drink of the wine I have mixed,'" Proverbs 9:1, 5. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition (that said, the tune HYFRYDOL should be well known in most Unitarian Universalist congregations all the same, as it is used for no. 140, "Hail the Glorious Golden City," and no. 166, "Years Are Coming," and no. 207, "Earth Was Given As a Garden"). The hymn does appear in The New Century Hymnal to the tune BEECHER (though HYFRYDOL is suggested as an alternative) as no. 43, with four stanzas. 1 John 4:16, "God is Love," Malachi 3:1, "The messenger of the covenant in whom you delight—indeed, he is coming, says the Lord of hosts." "And all of us ... seeing the glory of the Lord as though reflected in a mirror, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another," 2 Corinthians 3:18. 2 Corinthians 5:17, "So if anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation." "All you need to remember is that God will never let you down; he'll never let you be pushed past your limit; he'll always be there to help you come through it," 1 Corinthians 10:13b (The Message). "[N]ew creation," 2 Corinthians 5:17.

HYFRYDOL (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.)

1. Love di-vine, all loves ex-cell-ing,
Joy of heaven to earth come down;
Fix in us a hum-ble dwell-ing;
All your faith-ful mer-cies crown!
Wis-dom, you are all com-pas-sion;
Pure, un-bound-ed love im-part;
Vis-it us with your sal-va-tion;
En-ter eve-ry trem-bling heart.

2. Breathe, O breathe your lov-ing spir-it,
In-to eve-ry trou-bled breast!
Let us all in you in-her-it;
Let us find your prom-ised rest.
We would you be al-ways bless-ing,
Al-pha and O-me-ga be;
We would praise you with-out ceas-ing;
Set our hearts at li-ber-ty.

3. Come, E-ter-nal, to de-liv-er,
Let us all your life re-ceive;
Gra-cious-ly re-turn and ne-ver,
Ne-ver more your tem-ples leave.
Her-ald-ing a new cre-a-tion;
Heaven and earth take now their place;
Let us see your great sal-va-tion;
Lost in won-der, love, and praise.

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May 24, 2005

67R O Thou Whose Power Over Moving Worlds Presides

Original Title: "O Thou Whose Power Over Moving World Presides," Boethius (480-525), trans. Samuel Johnson (1750), OLD 124TH (10.10.10.10), Genevan Psalter (1551); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Boethius was a Roman statesman; his most famous work was The Consolations of Philosophy. He has been thought both a Christian and indeed a Christian martyr, yet his most famous work does not mention Christ or the Christian religion, and seems in the eyes of some to speak only the language of neo-Platonism (in a narrow sense, "a philosophical dialogue modelled on strictly pagan productions"). Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), also the name of the Unitarian hymnwriter from the 19th century (see no. 219R), here refers instead to the Englishman from a century before. Johnson was the subject of perhaps the earliest and best-known biography in English, written by John Boswell. A stanza of Boethius' original Latin has been added. "legem pone mihi Domine in via tua et dirige me in semita recta propter inimicos meos," Pslam 26:11 (Vulgate); "But as for me, I will go on in my upright ways: be my saviour, and have mercy on me," Psalm 26:11 (BBE); see also Proverbs 15:24, 12:28. "Dominus solus dux eius fuit et non erat cum eo deus alienus," Deuteronomy 32:12 (Vulgate); "So the Lord only was his guide, no other god was with him," Deuteronomy 32:12 (BBE); Exodus 13:21, 15:13, Acts 1:16. "[T]imor Domini principium," Proverbs 1:7a (Vulgate); "Start with God- the first step in learning is bowing down to God," Proverbs 1:7a (The Message); see also Proverbs 4:7, Proverbs 9:10. "[Christ] is a beginning, a first-born out of the dead," Colossians 1:18a (YLT); "[] qui est principium primogenitus ex mortuis," Colossians 1:18a (Vulgate). Romans 11:33 (KJV), "O the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! how unsearchable are his judgments, and his ways past finding out!" 1 Corinthians 2:7 (KJV), "But we speak the wisdom of God in a mystery, even the hidden wisdom, which God ordained before the world unto our glory," see also 1 Corinthians 1:24. Psalms 104:24 (KVJ), "O Lord, how manifold are thy works! in wisdom, hast thou made them all," see also Psalm 136:5, Proverbs 3:19. Jeremiah 10:12 (KJV), "He hath made the earth by his power, he hath established the world by his wisdom, and hath stretched out the heavens by his discretion." Genesis 1:14, "And God said, let there be lights," see also Genesis 7:24. The hymn is not included in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

OLD 124TH (10.10.10.10)

1. O Thou whose power o'er mov-ing worlds pre-sides,
whose voice cre-a-ted, and whose wis-dom guides,
On the dim earth in pure ef-ful-gence shine,
and cheer the cloud-ed mind with light di-vine,
and cheer the cloud-ed mind with light di-vine.

2. 'Tis thine a-lone to calm the re-verent breast,
with si-lent con-fi-dence and ho-ly rest;
from thee, great God! we spring, to thee we tend,
Path, Mo-tive, Guide, O-rig-i-nal, and End!
Path, Mo-tive, Guide, O-rig-i-nal, and End!

a. Tu nam-que se-re-num,
Tu re-qui-es tran-quil-la pi-is.
Te cer-ne-re fi-nis,
Prin-ci-pi-um, Vec-tor, Dux,
Se-mi-ta, Ter-mi-nus, I-dem.

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June 10, 2005

79R Father and Friend, Thy Light, Thy Love

ROSE HILL (L.M.)

1. Fath-er and Friend, thy light, thy love,
beam-ing through all thy works we see;
Thy glo-ry gilds the heavens a-bove,
and all the earth is full of thee.

2. Thy voice we hear, thy pre-sence feel,
while thou, too pure for mor-tal sight,
reign-est in clouds, in-vi-sib-le,
thou, La-dy of our life and light.

3. We know not in what hal-lowed part
of the wide heavens thy throne may be,
but this we know, that where thou art,
strength, wis-dom, good-ness dwell with thee.

4. Thy chil-dren shall not faint nor fear,
sus-tained by this ex-alt-ed thought;
Since thou, their God, art ev-ery-where,
they can-not be where thou art not!

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November 17, 2005

198R All Creatures of the Earth and Sky/Oh, criaturas del buen Dios

Original Title: "All Creatures of Our God and King," Francis of Assisi (1225), trans. W H. Draper, LASST UNS ERFERUEN, 8.8.4.4.8.8.3.3.4.4.4., Geistliche Kirchengesänge (Cologne 1623); New Title: "All Creatures of the Earth and Sky," recast from Umbrian REH (2005), Spanish J. Miguez Bonino, same hymn tune. Under the latter title it appears to LASST UNS ERFERUEN in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 203, albeit with only five stanzas; with even more changes it appears recast by Miriam Therese Winter as no. 17 in The New Century Hymnal as "To You, O God, All Creatures Sing." An abbreviated adaption by Sharon Anway is included in the UUA's Singing the Journey as No. 1066 to the tune YE BANKS AND BRAES under the name "O Brother Sun," to good reviews. The hymn is sometimes perceived as a take on Psalm 148; there are echoes of other psalms as well (such as Psalm 69); however, it most strongly echoes Psalm 100. The Spanish version, originally entitled "Oh, criaturas del Señor," as no. 22, in Mil Voces para celebrar. The redemption, and in some senses, personalization of Nature by St. Francis has a hint of natural theism about it, which no doubt explains the placement of the no. 1066 in the "Earth-Centered Traditions" section of Singing the Journey; that Christianity in some guises might count amongst such traditions ought not be discounted (as the editors seem to recognize implicitly), given the stewardship of the Earth that Genesis 2 bestows upon humankind.

LASST UNS ERFERUEN (8.8.4.4.8.8.3.3.4.4.4.)

1. All crea~tures~of the earth and sky,
Lift up your voice to heaven on high,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
O ra-diant sun with splen~did beam,
O pre-cious moon with sof-ter gleam!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!

2. O rush~ing~wind that blows so strong,
And storms that sail in skies a-long,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
O cher-ished air, in praise~re-joice,
with stars of even-ing, find a voice!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!

3. O use~ful~wat-er, pure and clear,
Make hum-ble sounds for all to hear,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
O fire so spir-it-ful~and bright,
That gives to us both warmth and light!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!

4. Dear kind~red~earth, who day by day,
Un-folds e'er bless-ings on our way,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
The flowers and fruits that in~you grow,
They ho-ly glo-ry a-lso show!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!


5. And all~dear~souls of ten-der heart,
For-giv-ing oth-ers, take your part,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
All who long pain and sor~row bear,
To the Most Ho-ly cast your care!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!

6. And you~most~kind and gent-le Death,
Wait-ing to hush our lat-est breath,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
Who leads to home the child~of God,
Death's Re-deem-er a way has trod!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!

7. Let all~things~the A-noin-ted bless,
And wor-ship God in hum-ble-ness,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
O praise the Most High, let~praise ring,
Lift up your voice and with all sing!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!


a. Oh, cri-a~tu-ras del buen Dios,
can-tad con me-lo-dio-sa voz:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-le-lu-_ya!
Ar-dien-te sol con tu ful-gor;
oh, lu-na de sua-ve~es-plen-dor:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-la-bad-le!
¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya!


b. Vien-to ve~loz, po-ten-te~a-lud,
nu-bes en cla-ro cie-lo~a-zul:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-le-lu-ya!
Sua-ve, do-ra~ado a-ma-ne-cer;
tu, man-to, no-che~al ex-ten-der:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-la-bad-le!
¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya!


c. Fuen-tes de~a-gua de cris-tal,
a vues-tro cre-a-dor can-tad:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-le-lu-ya!
Oh, fue-go,~e-le-va tu lo-or,
tú que nos da luz y ca-lor:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-la-bad-le!
¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya!

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December 04, 2005

206S Oh Dios, pedimos que nos des

Título original: "Oh nuestro Padre, nuestro Dios," Autor desconocido, ST. AGNES, 8.6.8.6., John Bacchus Dykes (1866); Título nuevo: "Oh Dios, pedimos que nos des," alterado REH (2005), misma tonada.

The hymn "Oh nuestro Padre, nuestro Dios," appears in the United Methodist hymnal Mil voces para celebrar as no. 368, originally with four stanzas, as a hymn for New Years', with no known author, and without copyright. Here the first stanza has been removed (along with any gender references to God), the remaining stanzas re-arranged, as a general-use hymn. Though it was written to ST. AGNES, it is not a translation of 206R herein, direct or otherwise. A relatively close English translation follows, which is meant to give an idea of the Spanish lyrics, but which is not meant to be sung. The lyrics echo the "powers and principalities" language of Paul in Colossians 2:15; there is also a hint of the third petition of the Lord's pray or the prayer of Jesus in Matthew 6:10. A living faith, firm hope, and burning love also suggest St. Paul. Colossians 1:5-8, 1 Corithians 13:3, 1 Thessalonians 1:3. Likewise the passing away of time and goods suggest the passing away of the "temporal" and the persistence of the "eternal" alluded to in 2 Corinthians 4:18.

ST. AGNES (8.6.8.6.)

1. Oh Dios, pe-di-mos que nos des
en tu ser-vi-cio ar-dor;
fir-me es-pe-ran-za,
vi-va fe y más ar-dien-te a-mor.

2. Haz-nos sen-tir la va-ni-dad
de cuan-to e-xis-te a-quí;
gran-de-zas, bie-nes, po-tes-tad
pe-re-ce-rán al fin.


3. El cie-lo, el or-be, el mun-do es-tán
di-cien-do tu bon-dad;
la vi-da, el tiem-po pa-sa-rán
se-gún tu vo-lun-tad. A-mén.

Translation of the Spanish (not to be sung):

1. O God, we ask that you give us
in your most burning service
firm hope, a living faith,
and more ardent love.

2. Make known to us the vanity
of so much that exists here;
Majesty, goods, power
will perish in the end.


3. The heavens, the globe, the world,
are speaking your goodness;
Life and time will pass
according to your will. Amen.

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January 05, 2006

531S Psalm 67: Bless Us, O God

Original Title: "God Be Merciful Unto Me," Anonymous, first setting, Anonymous, second setting, William Croft; New Title: "Psalm 67: Bless Us, O God," Christine Robinson (2006), arranged by REH (2006), first setting, Anonymous. Christine Robinson is a minister at First Unitarian Church in Albuquerque, New Mexico; her adaptation of the psalms has been part of her daily spiritual exercises since 2003. During a sabbatical from parish ministry, she began to write these psalms on a blog entitled Psalms for a New World, an adaptation using "inclusive language and through modern lenses of ecological awareness, Taoist sensibilites, and post-modern theology." Though the style of these adaptations would generally not be suited for metrical psalms or "four-square" hymn paraphrases, Hymns of the Spirit Two does contain a few Anglican-style plainchants that do not require rigorous rhyming or metrical schemes. This is one of those selections, and the Reverend Robinson's work has been adopted for inclusion here. She has graciously granted permission for same. The normal copyright restrictions on local and congregational use apply as noted below. Psalm 67 is the revised common lectionary psalm for Proper 15A/Ordinary 20A/Pentecost 13A and Easter 6C.

PSALM 67 (Chant)

1. Bless us, O God; whisper~in~our hearts and light our times.
2. Help~us~to~understand~your~love and your law; and~bring~them~to bear on the world’s ills.
3. Let~all~the~people~of~the earth praise you with~all their di-verse voi-ces.
4. Let~them~call~out~the~ten thou-sand names; let~all~nations~praise~you~with the best of their ways.
5. Let~the~peoples~of~the~earth bless the earth and~heal~earth~together;~let~us~all~enjoy each oth-er’s wis-dom.
6. Bless~us,~O~God,~with~your~presence in our hearts; and~in~the~soul~of our na-tion. A-men.

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July 14, 2006

610R My Soul Shall Bless the Soul of All

Title: "My Soul Shall Bless the Soul of All," William Cowper, Olney Hymns (London: 1779), TRURO, L.M., Thomas Williams, Psalmodia Evangelica, (1789); rev. REH (2006). Paraphrase of Pslam 34:1-8, which is a lectionary reading for All Saints A, Proper 14B/Ordinary 19B, and Proper 25B/Ordinary 30B.

TRURO (L.M.)

1. My soul shall bless the Soul of all,
my praise shall climb to God's a-bode;
O Ho-ly One, whose name I call,
the great Su-preme, the lov-ing God.

2. With-out be-gin-ning, or de-cline,
Ob-ject of faith, and not of sense;
e-ter-nal a-ges saw you shine,
and shine e-ter-nal a-ges hence.

3. Of all the crowns O God you bear,
for-give-ness is your dear-est claim;
that gra-cious sound well-pleased you hear,
who owns "God-with-us" as a name.


4. A cheer-ful con-fi-dence I feel,
my well-placed hopes with joy I see;
my bo-som glows with heaven-ly zeal
to wor-ship one who loves free-ly.

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