March 02, 2005

2R Praise the Sovereign, Heavens Adoring

Original Title: "Praise the Lord, Ye Heavens, Adore Him," Foundling Chapel College by Thomas Coram (1796) & Edward Osler, MENDELSSOHN (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.), Jacob Ludwig Mendelssohn-Bartholdy; New Title: "Praise the Sovereign, Heavens Adoring," rev. REH (2008), HYFRYDOL (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.), Rowland Hugh Pritchard, 1855.

HYFRYDOL (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.)

1. Praise the Sove-reign, heavens a-dor-ing;
An-gels sing-ing in the height;
Sun and moon, at once re-joic-ing;
Sing-ing, all the stars of light.
Praise the One who once has spo-ken;
Worlds the migh-ty voice o-beyed.
Laws, which nev-er shall be brok-en
For their gui-dance God has made.

2. Praise the Sove-reign ev-er glo-rious;
Nev-er shall the pro-mise fail.
God has made the saints vic-to-rious;
Sin and death shall not pre-vail.
Praise the One of our sal-va-tion;
Hosts on high, that power pro-claim.
Heaven and earth and all cre-a-tion,
Laud and mag-ni-fy the Name.

3. Wor-ship, hon-or, glo-ry, bless-ing,
God, we of-fer un-to you.
Young and old, all praise ex-press-ing,
In glad hom-age come to you.
All the saints in heaven a-dore you;
We would bow be-fore your throne.
As your an-gels serve be-fore you,
So on earth your will be done.

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The first stanza of the hymn is a paraphrase of Psalm 148; see also Psalm 29. See also Wisdom of Solomon 1:14, "And the generative forces of the world are wholesome, and there is no destructive poison in them;" compare the lyrics "death on earth shall not prevail."

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The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal. Below is another revised version, entitled "Praise the Sovereign, Heavens Above," rev. REH (2006), to the tune BENEVENETO (7.7.7.7. D):

BENEVENTO (7.7.7.7. D)

1. Praise the Sove-reign, heavens a-bove;
Sun and moon, re-joice with love;
Sing praise, an-gels in the heights;
Sing praise, all bright stars and lights.
[[Praise for God's words spo-ken thus
Co-ve-nant made e'er for us]]
Worlds the migh-ty voice obey-ed,
for their gui-dance God has made.

2. Praise the Sove-reign Glo-ri-ous,
praised by saints vic-to-ri-ous.
Nev-er shall the pro-mise fail:
Death on earth shall not pre-vail.
[[Praise our God, re-deem-ing all:
Heaven and earth's cre-a-tive call]]
Hosts on high, that power pro-claim:
Laud and mag-ni-fy the Name.

3. Ho-nor, wor-ship, love, bless-ing;
Young and old, trust ex-press-ing;
and in ho-mage bend the knee.
We lift our laud un-to thee;
[[All saints in heaven thee a-dore;
an-gels serve thee ev-er-more.]]
Thou art our e-ter-nal sun:
May on earth thy will be done.

The following downloads need to be changed to reflected the revised words in brackets above:

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Original lyrics as they appear in Hymns of the Sprit Two:

1. Praise the Lord: ye heavens, adore him;
Praise him, angels in the height.
Sun and moon, rejoice before him;
Praise him, all ye stars of light.
Praise the Lord, for he hath spoken;
Worlds his mighty voice obeyed.
Laws which never shall be broken
For their guidance he hath made.

2. Praise the Lord, for he is glorious;
Never shall his promise fail.
God hath made his saints victorious;
Sin and death shall not prevail.
Praise the God of our salvation;
Hosts on high, his power proclaim.
Heaven and earth and all creation,
Laud and magnify his Name.

3. Worship, honor, glory, blessing,
Lord, we offer unto thee.
Young and old, thy praise expressing,
In glad homage bend the knee.
All the saints in heaven adore thee;
We would bow before thy throne.
As thine angels serve before thee,
So on earth thy will be done.

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March 03, 2005

3R Holy Spirit, Source of Gladness

Original Title: "Holy Spirit, Source of Gladness," Paulus Gerhardt (1648), trans. John Christian Jacobi (c. 1725), adapted Samuel Longellow, ALTA TRINITA BEATA, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., Laudi Sprituali (14th Century), adapted Robert L. Sanders (1937); New Title: "Holy Spirit, Source of Gladness," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Paulus Gerhart was a 17th Century German Lutheran; Samuel Longfellow was a 19th Century American Unitarian, and editor of Hymns of the Spirit One. The hymn echoes Psalm 4:7, "you have put a gladness in my heart." "To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit for the common good," 1 Corinthians 12:7. It does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

ALTA TRINITA BEATA (8.7.8.7. D)

1. Ho-ly Spir-it source of glad-ness
come with all thy ra-diance bright,
o'er our wea-ri-ness and sad-ness,
breathe thy life and shed thy light!
Send us thine il-lu-mi-na-tion,
ba-nish all our fears at length;
rest up-on this con-gre-ga-tion,
spir-it of un-fail-ing strength.

2. Let that love which knows no mea-sure,
now in quick-ening showers de-scend,
bring-ing us the rich-est trea-sure
we can wish or God can send.
Hear our earn-est sup-pli-ca-tion,
ev-'ry strug-gling heart re-lease;
rest up-on this con-gre-ga-tion,
spir-it of un-trou-bled peace!

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March 04, 2005

4R Sing Praise to the Sovereign

Original Title: "Praise the Lord of Heaven," Thomas Briarly Brown (1844), WARUM SIND DIE THRÄNEN, 6.5.6.5.6.5.6.5., Johann Abraham Peter Schultz (1785); New Title: "Sing Praise to the Sovereign," rev. REH (2008), ST. DENIO, 11.11.11.11., Welsh Melody (1839).

ST. DENIO (11.11.11.11.)

1. Sing praise to the Sove-reign who reigns in the height;
Prais-es sing, all an-gels, sing praise, stars of light;
Sing praise, skies, and wa-ters which a-bove the skies,
When the word com-mand-ed, firm-ly did a-rise.

2. Prais-es sing, all foun-tains of the deeps and seas,
Rocks and hills and moun-tains, ce-dars and all trees;
Sing praise, clouds and va-pors, snow and hail and fire,
Stor-my wind ful-fil-ling on-ly one de-sire.

3. Sing praise, fowls and cat-tle, all queens and all kings;
Sing praise, men and wo-men, all cre-a-ted things;
For the name of God is ex-cel-lent a-lone;
On the earth, a foot-stool; o'er heav-en, a throne.

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The hymn lyrics constitue a paraphrase of Psalm 148; see also Pslam 29. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

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Below are alternative lyrics (rev. REH, 2006) that follow the original not quiet as closely, but which do undertake a more environmental message:

1. Sing praise to the Sove-reign that dwells in the heights;
Sing prais-es, all an-gels; sing praise, stars and lights;
Sing praise, skies and wa-ters; sing praise, bees and flies;
As the Word com-mands us, as ste-wards we rise.

2. Sing praise to the One that moves deeps and the seas,
Rocks, hills and the moun-tains; green ce-dars and trees;
Sing praise, clouds and va-pors; snow, hail and swift fire;
Sing praise by Earth ten-ding: ere E-den's de-sire.

3. Sing praise to the Day-spring, all flo-ra and beasts!
Sing prais-es all peo-ples, phy-si-cians and priests!
For in the di-vine name, we ev-er shall toil,
With pro-mis-es to keep, to air, shore and soil.

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March 06, 2005

6R O Worship Thy God

Original Title: "O Worship Thy King," Robert Grant, LYONS, 10.10.11.11., attributed to Johann Michael Haydn, New Title: "O Worship Thy God," rev. REH (2006), OLD 104TH, 10.10.11.11, Thomas Ravenscroft (1621). As a paraphrase of Psalm 104, a recast version of Robert Grant's hymn is offered here set to OLD 104TH, a tune with which it is sometimes paired. Other versions of Grant's hymn, with inclusive language and set to LYONS, may be found in Singing the Living Tradition as "We Worship Thee, God," as no. 285, and in the New Century Hymnal as "We Worship You, God" as no. 26.

OLD 104TH (10.10.11.11)

1. O wor-ship thy God, all glor-ious a-bove,
and grate-ful-ly sing that pow-er and love;
Our shield and de-fend-er, the An-cient of Days,
pa-vil-ioned in splen-dor, and gird-ed with praise.


2. O tell of that might, and sing of that grace,
whose robe is the light, whose ca-no-py space,
whose char-iots of jus-tice deep thun-der-clouds form,
and dim is the path on the wings of the storm.


3. The earth with its store of won-ders un-told,
al-migh-ty, thy power hath found-ed of old;
Es-tab-lished it fast by a change-less de-cree,
and round it hath cast, like a man-tle, the sea.

4. Thy boun-ti-ful care, what tongue can re-cite?
It breathes in the air, it shines in the light;
It streams from the hills, it des-cends to the plain,
and sweet-ly dis-tills in the dew and the rain.


5. Frail child-ren of dust, and fee-ble as frail,
by thy end-less trust we fear not to fail.
Thy wing with its shelt-er-ing touch does us mend,
for thou art our mak-er, re-deem-er and friend.

Original verses composed by William Kethe (1561) that do not appear in Hymns of the Spirit (1937):

a. My soule praise the Lord, speake good of his Name,
O Lord our great God how doest thou ap-peare,
So pass-ing in glor-ie, that great is thy fame,
Hon-our and maj-es-tie, in thee shine most cleare.

b. His cham-ber beames lie, in the clouds full sure,
Which as his char-iot, are made him to beare.
And there with much swift-ness, his course doth en-dure:
Up-on the wings rid-ing, of winds in the aire.

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March 07, 2005

7R Praise Be to God, the Almighty

Original Title: "Praise to the Lord, the Almighty," Joachim Neander (1680) trans. Catherine Winkworth (1858), LOBE DEN HERREN, 14.14.4.7.8., Straslund Gesangbuch (1665); New Title: "Praise Be to God, the Almighty," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune.

LOBE DEN HERREN (14.14.4.7.8.)

1. Praise be to God, the Al-migh-ty, who rules o'er cre-a-tion!
O my soul praise the One who is our health and sal-va-tion!
Join the great throng, wake harp and psal-ter and song;
Sound forth in glad a-dor-a-tion.

2. Praise be to God, who o'er all things is won-drous-ly reign-ing,
Who, as on eag-le's wings, is us so gent-ly sus-tain-ing!
Have you not seen all that is need-ed has been
Set by a gra-cious or-dain-ing?

3. Praise be to God, who has fear-less-ly, joy-ful-ly, made you;
Health has vouch-safed and, when heed-less-ly fall-ing, has stayed you.
What need or grief ev-er has failed of re-lief?
Wings of true mer-cy have shade you.


4. Praise be to God, who does pros-per your work and de-fend you;
Sure-ly such good-ness and mer-cy here dai-ly at-tend you.
Pon-der a-new what the Al-migh-ty can do,
Who with great love does be-friend you.


5. Praise be to God, who, when tem-pests their war-fare are wag-ing,
Who, when the el-e-ments mad-ly a-round you are rag-ing,
Bids them to cease, turns then their fu-ry to peace,
Whirl-winds and wa-ters as-suag-ing.


6. Praise be to God, O join all in sin-cere de-di-ca-tion;
All that has life and breath, come now in deep con-tem-pla-tion!
Let the A-men sound from all peo-ple a-gain,
Gather-ed in true a-dor-a-tion.

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The hymn is a recasting of Psalm 105, though there are echoes of other many other psalms in the hymn as well. "For as the rain and the snow come down from heaven, and do not return there until they have watered the earth, making it bring forth and sprout, giving seed to the sower and bread to the eater, so shall my word be that goes out from my mouth; it shall not return to me empty, but it shall accomplish that which I purpose, and succeed in the thing for which I sent it," Isaiah 55:10-11 (NRSV).

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The hymn appears with four stanzas as "Praise Be to God, the Almighty," as no. 278 in Singing the Living Tradition, and with four stanzas as well at no. 22 in The New Century Hymnal under the name "Sing Praise to God, Who Has Shaped;" the latter retranslated by Madeleine Forell Marshall.

Thanks to Kurt Werner for suggested changes to verse 6.

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7S Sing Songs to God, the All-loving

Original Title: "Praise to the Lord, the Almighty," Joachim Neander (1680) trans. Catherine Winkworth (1858), LOBE DEN HERREN, 14.14.4.7.8., Straslund Gesangbuch (1665); New Title: "Sing Songs to God, the Almighty," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Neander was pastor of the Reformed Church in Düsseldorf; this constitutes in essence a recasting of Psalm 105, though there are echoes of other many other psalms in the hymn as well. "For as the rain and the snow come down from heaven, and do not return there until they have watered the earth, making it bring forth and sprout, giving seed to the sower and bread to the eater, so shall my word be that goes out from my mouth; it shall not return to me empty, but it shall accomplish that which I purpose, and succeed in the thing for which I sent it," Isaiah 55:10-11 (NRSV). It appears with four stanzas as "Praise Be to God, the Almighty," as no. 278 in Singing the Living Tradition, and with four stanzas as well at no. 22 in The New Century Hymnal under the name "Sing Praise to God, Who Has Shaped;" the latter retranslated by Madeleine Forell Marshall.

LOBE DEN HERREN (14.14.4.7.8.)

1. Sing songs to God, the All-lov-ing, who sus-tains cre-a-tion!
O my soul praise the Life who is our health and sal-va-tion!
Join the great throng, wake harp and psal-ter and song;
Sound forth in glad a-dor-a-tion.

2. Prais-ed be Love, still with all things so won-drous-ly work-ing,
and as on eag-le's wings, is us so gent-ly up-lift-ing!
Have you not seen all that Earth need-ed has been
moved by Life's gra-cious or-dain-ing?

3. Re-mem-ber Truth, that has fear-less-ly, joy-ful-ly, freed you;
Chains has reclaimed and, when heed-less-ly fall-ing, has stayed you.
What need or grief ev-er has failed of re-lief?
Wings of true mer-cy have shade you.


4. Sing now God's praise, who does pros-per your work and de-fend you;
Life's com-mon mi-ra-cles dai-ly with mer-cy at-tend you.
Pon-der a-new what the Al-migh-ty can do,
who with great love does be-friend you.


5. Thanks now to Peace, when the tem-pests their war-fare are wag-ing,
and when the el-e-ments mad-ly a-round you are rag-ing,
bids them to cease, turns then their fu-ry to ease,
whirl-winds and wa-ters as-suag-ing.


6. Praise the Di-vine, O join all in one true de-di-ca-tion;
all that has life and breath, come now in deep con-tem-pla-tion!
Let the A-men sound from all peo-ple a-gain,
gather-ed in true a-dor-a-tion.


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See comments in 7R; downloads need to be changed to reflect lyrics in verse 6.

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7T Alma, bendice a Dios

Título: "Alma, bendice a Dios," Joachim Neander, trad. Fritz Fliedner, rev. REH (2006); LOBE DEN HERREN, 14.14.4.7.8., Straslund Gesangbuch (1665), arm. William Sterndale Bennett. Paráfrasis del Salmo 105, pero con toques de otros salmos también. "Porque como desciende de los cielos la lluvia y la nieve, y no vuelve allá, sino que riega la tierra, y la hace germinar y producir, y da semilla al que siembra, y pan al que come, así será mi palabra que sale de mi boca; no volverá a mí vacía, sino que hará lo que yo quiero, y será prosperada en aquello para que la envié," Isaías 55:10-11 (Reina-Valera 1960). No. 21, "Alma, bendice a Dios," en El Himnario (Church Publishing, Inc. 1998), la editorial de la Iglesia Episcopal (Anglicana) en los Estados Unidos; no. 28 en Mil voces para celebrar.

LOBE DEN HERREN (14.14.4.7.8.)

1. Al-ma, ben-di-ce a Dios, a-mor al-to de glo-ria;
de sus mer-ce-des es-té vi-va~en ti la me-mo-ria.
¡Oh, des-per-tad, ar-pa~y sal-ter-io~en-ton-ad
him-nos de~ho-nor y vic-tor-ia.

2. Al-ma, ben-di-ce a Dios, que~a los or-bes go-bier-na,
y te con-du-ce pa-cien-te con ma-no ma-ter-na;
y te guar-dó co-mo me-jor le~ag-ra-dó,
por-que su gra-cia~es e-ter-na.

3. Al-ma, ben-di-ce a Dios, de tu vi-da la fuen-te,
que te cre-ó, y~en sa-lud te sos-tie-ne cle-men-te;
tu de-fen-sor en to-do tran-ce~y do-lor,
su dies-tra~es om-ni-po-ten-te.

4. Al-ma, ben-di-ce a Dios por su a-mor in-fi-ni-to;
con todo~el pue-blo de Dios su~a-la-ban-za re-pi-to.
¡Dios, mi sa-lud, de to-do bien ple-ni-tud,
se-as por siem-pre ben-di-to! A-mén.

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March 10, 2005

10R Ruler and Power On High

Original Title: "Come, Thou Almighty King," Anonymous (before 1757), ITALIAN HYMN, 6.6.4.6.6.6.4., Felice Giardini (1769); New Title: "Ruler and Power on High," rev. REH (2007), same hymn tune. The hymn first appeared in George Whitefield's Collection of Hymns for Social Worship (1757); some attribute the hymn to Charles Wesley. The tune ITALIAN HYMN was written specifically for the hymn. "God reigneth over the nations; God sitteth upon the throne of his holiness." Psalm 47:8; see also Revelation 19:6, Isaiah 52:7. "Wisdom has built her house . . .She has sent out her servant-girls, she calls from the highest places in the town," Proverbs 9:1-3. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but it does appear in The New Century Hymnal as "Come Now, Almighty God," as no. 275.

ITALIAN HYMN (6.6.4.6.6.6.4.)

1. Rul-er and power on high,
to you our prais-es fly;
Your name we raise,
Fa-ther all-glo-ri-ous,
Mo-ther vic-to-ri-ous,
come and reign o-ver us,
An-cient of Days.

2. Come now all-gra-cious Lord,
by heaven and earth a-dored;
our prayer at-tend;
Wis-dom, your chil-dren bless,
give your good word suc-cess;
Make your own ho-li-ness
on us des-cend.

3. Ne-ver from us de-part,
but rule in ev-ery heart;
hence, e-ver-more.
Your sove-reign ma-jes-ty
may we in glo-ry see,
and to e-ter-ni-ty,
love and a-dore. A-men.

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March 13, 2005

13R Rejoice, You Pure In Heart

Original Title: "Rejoice, Ye Pure in Heart," Edward Hayes Pulmptre (1865), MARION, 6.6.8.6.4.6., Arthur Henry Messiter (1883); New Title: "Rejoice You Pure in Heart," rev. REH (2006), ICH HALTE TREULICH STILL, S.M.D., attributed to Bach (1736). The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but does appear in revised form as "Rejoice, You Pure in Heart," as no. 55 to MARION and as no. 71 to VINEYARD HAVEN in The New Century Hymnal. Pulmptre was a 19th century English Anglican. One hears Psalm 20 in lyrics about the "festal banner," the first line of Psalm 147 in the refrain, and Phillipians 4:4 in the title line and the refrain, "Rejoice . . . rejoice."

ICH HALTE TREULICH STILL (S.M.D.)

1. Re-joice, you pure in heart,
re-joice give thanks and sing;
your fes-tal ban-ner wave on high--
the cross of Christ rais-ing.

Refrain.
Re-joice, give thanks and sing; Re-joice, give thanks and sing;
Re-joice, re-joice, re-joice, and sing; Re-joice, give thanks and sing!

2. With all the an-gel choirs,
with all the saints of earth,
pour out the strains of joy and bliss,
true rap-ture, nob-lest mirth. Refrain.


3. Your clear ho-san-nas raise;
And al-le-lu-ias loud;
While an-swer-ing ech-oes up-ward float,
like wreaths of incense cloud. Refrain.

4. With voice as full and strong
as o-cean’s surg-ing praise,
send forth the hymns an-ces-tors loved,
the psalms of an-cient days. Refrain.

5. At last the toil shall end,
the wear-ied ones shall rest,
the pil-grims find the ho-ly home,
where saints are tru-ly blest. Refrain.

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March 19, 2005

19R How Lovely Is Your Dwelling Place

Original Title: "How Lovely Are Thy Dwellings Fair," John Milton (1645), CAITHNESS, C.M., Melody in Scottish Psalter (1635); New Title: "How Lovely Is Your Dwelling Place," rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Milton was an English Puritan (Congregationalist) and poet, best known for Paradise Lost. The hymn is a recast of Psalm 84. It does not appear in either Singing the Living Tradition or The New Century Hymnal.

CAITHNESS (C.M.)

1. How love-ly is your dwell-ing place,
O God of heaven; how dear
the pleas-ant ta-ber-na-cles' space
where you do dwell so near!

2. The spar-rows have long sought to fly
sky-ward, and your courts view;
the swal-lows in their nests still cry,
O Ho-ly One, for you.

3. Hap-py, who in your house re-side,
where they to you sing praise!
Hap-py, whose strength with you do side,
and in their hearts your ways!

4. They jour-ney on from strength to strength
with joy and glad-some cheer,
till all be-fore our God at length
in Zi-on does ap-pear.

5. O God of heaven that reigns on high,
that we are tru-ly blest
who tru-ly on you do re-ly,
and in you tru-ly rest. A-men
.

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March 20, 2005

20R As Pants the Hart for Cooling Streams

Original Title: "As Pants the Hart for Coolings Streams," Nahum Tate and Nicholas Brady (1696), MARTYRDOM, C.M., Hugh Wilson, arr. R. A. Smith (1825); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but does appear as no. 481 in The New Century Hymnal. The hymn is a recast of Psalm 42.

MARTYRDOM (C.M.)

1. As pants the hart* for cool-ing streams,
when heat-ed in the chase,
so longs my soul, O God, for you
and your re-fresh-ing grace.

2. Why rest-less, why cast down, my soul?
Hope still; and you shall sing
the praise of one who is your God,
your health's e-ter-nal spring.

3. Deep calls to deep, and o-ceans roar;
For God my soul does pine;
O when shall I be-hold your face,
O ma-jes-ty di-vine?

4. Why rest-less, why cast down, my soul?
Trust God who will em-ploy
all aid for you and change these sighs
to thank-ful hymns of joy. A-men


* deer

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March 23, 2005

23R Enter In the Holy Temple

Original Title: "God Is In His Holy Temple," from Hymns of the Spirit One (1864), edited by Samuel Longfellow, STUTTGART, 8.7.8.7., Chrisitian Friedrich Witt, adapted (1715)(alternatively AUTUMN, 8.7.8.7., published by Françoise Barthélémon (before 1793)); New Title: "Enter In the Holy Temple," rev. REH (2006), PORTSEA, William Boyce, A Collection of Melodies for the Psalms of David According to the Version of Christopher Smart A.M. ­(circa 1765). The lyrics echo Psalm 122. The hymn appears neither in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

PORTSEA (8.7.8.7.)

1. En-ter in the ho-ly tem-ple,
earth-ly thoughts be si-lent now,
while in rev-erence we as-sem-ble,
and be-fore the Pre-sence bow.

2. O Love is with us for-ev-er,
when we call up-on the Name,
aid-ing ev-ery good en-deav-or,
guid-ing ev-ery up-ward aim.

3. God is in the ho-ly tem-ple,
in the pure and ho-ly mind,
in the reve-rent heart and sim-ple,
in the soul from sense re-fined.

4. Then let ev-ery low e-mo-tion
ban-ished far and sil-ent be,
and our souls in pure de-vo-tion,
Sove-reign, wor-thy tem-ples be!


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April 03, 2005

26R O Source Divine and Life of All

Original Title: "O Source Divine and Life of All," John Sterling (1839), SONG 34 (GIBBONS), L.M., Orlando Gibbons, Rhythm altered (1623); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. The version of SONG 34 here differs slightly from the version of the tune that appears in Hymns of the Spirit Two. Sterling was born on the Isle of Bute, in Scotland. "For with thee is the fountain of life: in thy light shall we see light. O continue thy lovingkindness unto them that know thee; and thy righteousness to the upright in heart." Psalm 36:10-11 (KJV). The hymn appears neither in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. This is particularly notable given the line in the third stanza, "through the ceaseless web to trace," words so redolent of the so-called "Seventh Principle" of the Unitarian Universalist Association's Principles and Purposes.

SONG 34 (GIBBONS)

1. O Source di-vine, and Life of all,
the Fount of be-ing’s won-drous sea!
Thy depth does ev-ery heart e'er call
that we may see love's dream in thee.

2. We shrink be-fore thy vast a-byss,
where worlds on worlds e-ter-nal brood.
We know thee tru-ly but in this--
That thou be-stow-est all our good.

3. And so, mid bound-less time and space,
O grant us still in thee to dwell,
and through the cease-less web to trace
thy pre-sence work-ing all things well.


4. Nor let thou life’s de-light-ful play
thy truth’s trans-cend-ent vi-sion hide;
Nor strength and glad-ness lead a-stray
from thee, our na-ture’s on-ly guide.

5. Be-stow on all our joy-ous thrills
thy deep-er tones of reve-rent awe:
Make free thy child-ren’s world-ly wills,
and in-cline hearts toward hol-ier law.

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April 04, 2005

27R Where Ancient Forests Round Us Spread

Original Title: "Where Ancient Forests Widely Spread," Andrews Norton (1833), WAINWRIGHT, L.M., Richard Wainwright; New Title: "Where Ancient Forests Round Us Spread," rev. REH (2005), AGINCOURT (DEO GRATIAS), Traditional English Melody (1415). Andrews Norton, an American Unitarian, is famous for having said that Ralph Waldo Emerson’s [Harvard] Divinity School Address represented "the newest form of infidelity." As beloved a figure as Emerson is for many, Norton's provocation takes nothing away from his own place in Unitarian Universalist hymnody. The full form of the hymn was anthologized in 1900 by Edmund Clarence Stedman (1833-1908) in his An American Anthology 1787-1900, as no. 51, where it is called "Hymn for the Dedication of a Church." In that collection, it began "Where ancient forests round us spread," as does the revised version here. Compare 2 Kings 19:22-24. Genesis 28:17, "How awesome is this place! This is none other than the house of God; this is the gate of heaven." The Universe is filled by God, in God "we live and move and have our being." Acts 17:28.; see also Psalm 84. "The Lord has blessed the household of Obededom and all that belongs to him, because of the ark of God," 2 Samuel 6:12, suggesting, as in the lyrics, there are places where "human thought burns clearer" given their chosen status. Tradition has it that the AGINCOURT was written to laud the victory of the English at Normandy. The hymn appears in neither Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

AGINCOURT (DEO GRATIAS) (L.M.)

1. Where an-cient for-ests round us spread,
where bends~the cat'-ract's o-cean fall,
on the lone moun-tain's si-lent head,
there are your tem-ples, God of all!

2. Be-neath the dark-blue, mid-night arch,
whence my~riad suns pour down their rays,
where pla-nets trace their cease-less march,
O Life! we praise you as we gaze.

3. All space is ho-ly, for all space
is filled~by you; And hu-man thought
burns clear-er in some chos-en place,
where your own words of love are taught.

4. May we be taught, and may we know
a faith~your ser-vants knew of old
which on-ward bears through weal and woe,
till Death the gates of heaven un-fold.

5. Nor we a-lone, may those whose brow
shows yet~no trace of hu-man cares,
here-aft-er stand where we do now,
and raise to you still hol-ier prayers!


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April 05, 2005

28R God of the Earth, the Sky, the Sea

Original Title: "God of the Earth, the Sky and the Sea," Samuel Longfellow (1864), WINCHESTER NEW, L.M., Hamburger Musikalisches Handbuch (1690); New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2005), ST. CATHERINE, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Henri F. Hemy (1865). Psalm 24:1-2, "The earth is the Lord's, and all it contains . . . For He has founded it upon the seas, and established it upon the rivers." Genesis 1:27, "[I]n the image of God . . . male and female [God] created them;" see also Genesis 9:6. "God's likeness," 2 Corinthians 3:18, 1 Corinthians 15:49. The Indwelling God, John 15:4. Proverbs 22:2, "The rich and the poor have this in common: the Lord is the maker of them all." The hymn is not contained in The New Century Hymnal, but is found in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 25, to the tune DUKE STREET, L.M.

ST. CATHERINE (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. God of the earth, the sky, the sea,
Mak-er of all a-bove, be-low,
cre-a-tion lives and moves in thee,
thy pre-sent life in all doth flow.
We give thee thanks, thy name we sing;
O Ho-ly One, our praise we bring!

2. Thy love is in the sun-shine’s glow,
thy life is in the quick-ening air;
When light-ning flash-es and storm winds blow,
there is thy power; thy law is there.
We give thee thanks, thy name we sing;
O Ho-ly One, our praise we bring!

3. We feel thy calm at even-ing’s hour,
thy grand-eur in the march of night;
And when thy morn-ing breaks in power,
we hear thy word, “Let there be light.”
We give thee thanks, thy name we sing;
O Ho-ly One, our praise we bring!

4. But high-er far, and far more clear,
thee in our spir-its we be-hold;
Thine im-age and thy-self are there—
Th’in-dwell-ing God, pro-claimed of old!
We give thee thanks, thy name we sing;
O Ho-ly One, our praise we bring!

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April 07, 2005

30R Immortal, Invisible, God Only Wise

Original Title: "Immortal, Invisible, God Only Wise," Walter Chalmers Smith (1876), ST. DENIO, 11.11.11.11., Welsh Melody (1839); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2007), same hymn tune. Smith was Scottish. The tune and hymn appear as "Immortal, Invisible" in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 273, with the exception of the final stanza; it appears here. The hymn appears without parental metaphors in The New Century Hymnal as no. 1. The lyrics resonate with some of the images in Psalm 139, as well as Psalm 36:5-6, 103:14-17, and 104:27-39; but most directly the lyrics are based on 1 Timothy 1:17. The webdesigner graciously thanks Haruo for his assistance with the minor revisions to Smith's lyrics below.

ST. DENIO (11.11.11.11.)

1. Im-mort-al, in-vi-si-ble, God on-ly wise,
in light in-ac-ces-si-ble hid from our eyes,
most bles-sèd, most glo-rious, the An-cient of Days,
Al-migh-ty, vic-tor-ious, thy great Name we praise.

2. Un-rest-ing, un-hast-ing, and si-lent as light,
nor want-ing, nor wast-ing, thou rul-est in might;
thy jus-tice, like moun-tains, high soar-ing a-bove
thy clouds, which are foun-tains of good-ness and love.


3. To all, life thou giv-est, to both great and small;
In all life thou liv-est, the true life of all;
We blos-som and flour-ish as leaves on the tree,
and with-er and per-ish— but naught chang-eth thee.

4. Great Fath-er, Great Moth-er, O Light of all light,
thine an-gels a-dore thee, all veil-ing their sight;
All laud we would rend-er; O help us to see
’tis on-ly the splen-dor of light hid-eth thee.


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April 08, 2005

31R Thou Art O God the Life and Light

Original Title: "Thou Art, O God, the Life and Light," Thomas Moore (1816), MACH'S MIT MIR, GOTT, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Johann Hermann Schein (1645), harmony by J. S. Bach; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), OLD 113TH, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Matthäus Greiter (1500-1552). Thomas Moore was a Roman Catholic and Irish Nationalist. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition or in The New Century Hymnal. "With thee is the fountain of life: in thy light shall we see light," Psalm 36:9. "The flowers appear on the earth; the time of singing has come," The Song of Songs 2:12. "Clouds of heaven," Daniel 7:13, Matthew 26:64, Mark 14:62.

OLD 113TH (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. Thou art, O God, the Life and Light
of all this won-drous world we see;
Its glow by day, its smile by night,
are but re-flec-tions caught from thee;
Wher-e'er we turn, thy glo-ries shine:
all things beau-teous and bright are thine.

2. When day, with fare-well beam, de-lays
a-mong the open-ing clouds of even,
and we can al-most think we gaze
through gold-en vis-tas in-to heaven,
those hues, that make the sun's de-cline
so soft, so ra-diant, God, are thine.

3. When budd-ing spring a-round us breathes
thy spir-it warms a fra-grant sigh,
and eve-ry flower the sum-mer wreathes
is born be-neath that kind-ling eye--
Wher-e'er we turn, thy glo-ries shine:
all things beau-teous and bright are thine.

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April 11, 2005

34R Heaven and Earth and Sea and Air

Original Title: "Heaven and Earth and Sea and Air," Joachim Neander (1680), trans. James Drummond Burns, POSEN, 7.7.7.7., Georg Christoph Strattner (1691); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), GOTT SEI DANK, 7.7.7.7., Johann A. Freylinghausen (1704). Psalm 57:7-11, 108:1-5; see also Psalm 19. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but it does appear in a version translated by Madeleine Forrell Marshall (1993) as no. 566, in five stanzas, also to the tune GOTT SEI DANK, in The New Century Hymnal. For Joachim Neander, see the entry under no. 7R.

GOTT SEI DANK (7.7.7.7.)

1. Heaven and earth, and sea and air,
all their mak-er’s praise de-clare;
Wake, my soul, a-wake and sing:
Now thy grate-ful prais-es bring.

2. See the glo-rious orb of day
break-ing through the clouds a-way;
Moon and stars with sil-very light
sing praise through the si-lent night.

3. O God's love hath eve-ry-where
made this earth so rich and fair;
hill and vale and fruit-ful land,
all life bears a ho-ly hand.

4. God, great won-ders work-est thou!
To thy sway all crea-tures bow;
Write thou deep-ly in my heart
what I am, and what thou art.


a. Him-mel, Er-de, Luft und Meer
zeu-gen von des Schöp-fers Ehr;
mei-ne See-le, sin-ge du,
bring auch jetzt dein Lob her-zu.


b. Seht das gro-ße Sonn-en-licht,
wie es durch die Wol-ken bricht;
auch der Mond, der Ster-ne Pracht
jauch-zen Gott bei still-er Nacht.

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April 12, 2005

35R Let the Whole Creation Cry

Original Title: "Let the Whole Creation Cry," Stopford Augustus Brooke, VIENNA, 7.7.7.7., Justin Heinrich Knecht (1799); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Brooke was a 19th Century Irish writer and churchman, first ordained in the Chruch of England, but later he officiated as a Unitarian minister at Bedford chapel, Bloomsbury. Psalm 148:5, "On the glorious splendor of your majesty,and on your wondrous works, I will meditate." (ESV). Neither Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal contains the hymn. The website maintained by St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church includes a paraphrase of Psalm 148 called "The Furthest Depths of Outer Space" with words by Matthew Priest, to the tune KISSLING, 8.8.6.8.8.6., which may be locally reproduced.

VIENNA (7.7.7.7.)

1. Let the whole cre-a-tion cry:
Glo-ry be to God on high!
Sun and moon, up-lift your voice,
night and stars, in God re-joice!


2. Chant out ho-nor, o-cean fair!
Earth, soft rush-ing through the air!
Sun-shine, dark-ness, cloud and storm,
rain and snow high praise per-form.

3. Let the blos-soms of the earth
join the u-ni-ver-sal mirth;
Birds, with morn and dew e-late,
sing with joy at heav-en's gate.


4. All souls on the side of right,
pro-phets speak-ing words of might;
Po-ets, fight-ers, ar-ti-sans:
Raise the anth-em once a-gain!

5. And let chil-dren's hap-py hearts
in this wor-ship bear their parts:
Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly, cry,
Glo-ry be to God on high!

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April 14, 2005

37R Thou Rulest, God, the Lights On High

Original Title: "Thou Rulest, God, the Lights On High," Theodore Chickering Williams (1911), MELCOMBE, L.M., Samuel Webbe (1782); New Title: Same hymn tune, rev. REH (2006), ERHALT UNS, HERR, L.M., Geisliche Lieder (Wittenberg 1543). "[W]isdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, willing to yield, full of mercy." James 3:17. "Does not Wisdom call, and does not understanding raise her voice?" Proverbs 8:1; see also Proverbs 1:20-25. "O Lord, how manifold are your works! In wisdom you have made them all; the earth is full of your creatures," Psalm 104:24. Williams served as pastor of All Souls Church (Unitarian) in New York City for 13 years. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

ERHALT UNS, HERR (L.M.)

1. Thou rul-est, God, the lights on high;
Sun, moon and stars thy ser-vants be.
Yet eve-ry glo-ry of the sky
is bright-er still when I have thee.

2. How vast the mar-vel of the mind,
how far the beams of rea-son go!
Yet all wis-dom of hu-man-kind
burns deep-er still when thee I know.


3. Wher-e'er I look is light and joy:
A bloom-ing flower, an eag-le's wing;
their sin-less ju-bi-lee em-ploy,
and to thy praise full tri-bute bring.

4. Thy gifts to us be-yond com-pare,
like roy-al crowns and em-blems shine;
yet bring us nev-er to des-pair
when we hold these grand gifts as thine.


5. De-light and wis-dom, peace and power,
a heart of hope, se-rene and free,
through life's dim dream and tran-sient hour
I find, O God, tru-ly in thee.


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April 15, 2005

38R The Harp at Nature's Advent Strung

Original Title: "The Harp at Nature's Advent Strung," John Greenleaf Whittier, EVAN, C.M., William Henry Havergal, arranged by Lowell Mason (1850); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), LLANGLOFLAN, 8.6.8.6., Welsh Hymn Melody. Whittier was an anti-slavery Quaker and poet, who was secretary of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Though born in Boston, he lived in Philadelphia where he edited the Pennsylvania Freeman. The complete, original poem, called "The Worship of Nature" contains ten verses, rather than the six below, or the five in Hymns of the Spirit Two and the five in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 74 (It is not contained in The New Century Hymnal). Though anthologized in The Complete Poetical Works of John Greenleaf Whittier, (Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1894), the poem was first published in 1867. "All the earth . . . make music to the Lord with the harp, with the harp and the sound of singing, . . . Let the sea resound, and everything in it, the world, and all who live in it." Psalm 98:4-7 "You have kept the good wine until now," John 2:10, Nehemiah 8:10.

LLANGLOFLAN (8.6.8.6.)

1. The harp at Na-ture's ad-vent strung
has never ceas-ed to play;
the song the stars of morn-ing sung
has ne-ver died a-way.
And prayer is made, and praise is given,
by all things near and far;
the o-cean look-eth up to heaven,
and mirr-ors eve-ry star.

2. Its waves are kneel-ing on the strand,
as kneels the hu-man knee,
their white locks bow-ing to the sand,
the priest-hood of the sea!
The green earth sends its in-cense up
from many a moun-tain shrine;
from fold-ed leaf and de-wy cup
and pours a sacr-ed wine.

3. The blue sky is the tem-ple's arch,
its tran-sept earth and air,
the mu-sic of its star-ry march
the cho-rus of a prayer.
So Na-ture keeps the re-verent frame
with which the years be-gan,
and all the signs and voi-ces shame
the prayer-less heart a-gain.

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April 20, 2005

42R Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee

Original Title: "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee," Henry Van Dyke (1908), JOY, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., arranged from Ludwig van Beethoven; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Van Dyke was an American Presbyterian. The hymn tune is known as HYMN TO JOY in Singing the Living Tradition; no. 29 is a three-verse version of "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee;" no. 327 in the 1993 hymn is entitled "Joy, Thou Goddess," with original German lyrics for two stanzas of "Freude, schöner Götterfunken." The latter hymn, by Friedrich Schiller, constitutes the "original" lyrics insofar as they inspired Beethoven's composition. The New Century Hymnal has four verses (without sibling references) as no. 4, "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore You." See Psalm 145:10, "All your works shall give thanks to you," see also Psalm 71:23; Isaiah 49:13, "Sing for joy, O heavens, and exult, O earth; break forth, O mountains, into singing!"

JOY (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.)

1. Joy-ful, joy-ful, we a-dore thee, God of glo-ry, God of love;
Hearts un-fold like flowers be-fore thee, open-ing to the sun a-bove.
Melt the clouds of sin and sad-ness; drive the dark* of doubt a-way;
Giv-er of im-mort-al glad-ness, fill us with the light of day!


2. All thy works with joy sur-round thee, earth and heaven re-flect thy rays,
stars and an-gels sing a-round thee, cent-er of un-brok-en praise.
Field and for-est, vale and moun-tain, flow-ery mead-ow, flash-ing sea,
sing-ing bird and flow-ing foun-tain call us to re-joice in thee.

3. Thou art giv-ing and for-giv-ing, ev-er bless-ing, ev-er blessed;
Well-spring of the joy of liv-ing, o-cean depth of hap-py rest!
Lov-ing Sove-reign, Moth-er, Fath-er, all who live in love are thine;
teach us how to love each oth-er, lift us to the joy di-vine.

4. Mor-tals, join the hap-py chor-us, which the morn-ing stars beg-an;
Christ our Bro-ther reigns a-mongst us; Sis-ter Wis-dom seals the plan.
Ev-er sing-ing, march we on-ward, vic-tors in the midst of strife,
Joy-ful mus-ic leads us sun-ward in the tri-umph song of life.

*or 'storms'

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May 04, 2005

51R O Love Divine, of All That Is

Original Title: "O Love Divine, of All That Is," arranged from John White Chadwick (1865), BANGOR, C.M., William Tans'ur's Compleat Melody (1734); New Title: Same hymn title, no change in lyrics here, same hymn tune. Chadwick was a 19th Century American Unitarian minister, who was graduated from Harvard Divinity in 1864, and ordained at Second Unitarian in Brooklyn; he wrote for both the AUA publication The Christian Register and Harper's. Psalm 139:2, 4, 23, "Thou . . . understandest my thought afar off . . .For there is not a word in my tongue, but, lo . . . thou knowest it altogether . . . Search me, O God, and know my heart: try me, and know my thoughts." Romans 5:8, "But God commendeth [God's] love toward us." "Keep on asking . . . Keep on looking . . . Keep on knocking," Matthew 7:7-8; see also Mark 11:24. The hymn is not included in Singing the Living Tradition, and is not included in The New Century Hymnal.

BANGOR (C.M.)

1. O Love Di-vine, of all that is,
the sweet-ness still and best,
ea-ger I come and rest my heart
up-on thy faith-ful breast.

2. I pray thee turn me not a-way,
for sin-ful though I be,
thou know-est eve-ry-thing I need,
and all my need of thee.


3. I do not pray be-cause I would,
I pray be-cause I must:
There is no mean-ing in my prayer
but thank-ful-ness and trust.


4. And thou wilt hear the thought I mean
and not the words I say;
Wilt hear the thanks a-mong the words
that on-ly seem to pray.

5. Thou dost not wait un-til I urge
my way-ward steps to thee;
But in the dark-ness of my life
art com-ing still to me.


6. And while it hea-vy sighed, my heart
has sung it-self to rest,
O Love Di-vine, for-ev-er near,
up-on thy faith-ful breast. A-men.

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May 05, 2005

51S O Love Divine, of All That Is

Original Title: "O Love Divine, of All That Is," arranged from John White Chadwick (1865), BANGOR, C.M., William Tans'ur's Compleat Melody (1734); New Title: "O Love Divine, of All That Is," rev. REH (2005), ELLACOMBE, C.M.D., Gesangbuch der Herzogl, Wirtermbergischen Katholischen Hofkapelle (1784). Chadwick was a 19th Century American Unitarian minister, who was graduated from Harvard Divinity in 1864, and ordained at Second Unitarian in Brooklyn; he wrote for both the AUA publication The Christian Register and Harper's. Psalm 139:2, 4 (The Message), "God, . . . I'm an open book to you; even from a distance, you know what I'm thinking . . . You know everything I'm going to say before I start the first sentence." Romans 5:8, "God put [God's own] love on the line for us." "Don't bargain with God. Be direct. Ask for what you need," Matthew 7:7; see also Mark 11:24. The hymn is not included in Singing the Living Tradition, and is not included in The New Century Hymnal.

ELLACOMBE (C.M.D.)

1. O Love Di-vine, of all that is,
the sweet-ness still and best,
ea-ger I come and rest my heart
up-on your faith-ful breast.
I pray you turn me not a-way,
what-e'er my va-ni-ty,
you know well eve-ry-thing I need;
My needs to you I plea.

2. I do not pray be-cause I wish,
I pray be-cause I must:
There is no mean-ing in my prayer
but thank-ful-ness and trust.
And you will hear the thought I mean
and not the words I say;
You hear the thanks a-mong the words
that on-ly seem to pray.

3. You do not wait un-til I move
my way-ward steps toward you;
And through the sor-rows of my life
you still my soul pur-sue.
And while it hea-vy sighed, my heart
has sung it-self to rest,
O Love Di-vine, for-ev-er near,
up-on your faith-ful breast.

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May 15, 2005

58R O Not In Far-Off Realms of Space

Original Title: "Go Not, My Soul, In Search of Him," Frederick Lucian Hosmer (1879), first tune, OLD 137TH, C.M.D., One and fiftie Psalms of David (1556), second tune, STRACATHRO, C.M, Charles Hutcheson (1832); New Title: "O Not In Far-Off Realms of Space," Frederick Lucian Hosmer (1879), alt. REH (2006), OLD 137TH, C.M.D. Hosmer, born 1840, was an American Unitarian minister, and graduate of Harvard Divinity School. Hosmer's "Go Not My Soul in Search of Him," as it is called in Hymns of the Spirit Two, does not seem to be casually matched with OLD 137TH, but instead seems to take Psalm 137 as a point of radical departure. While the psalm asks how the songs of Zion might be sung in the land of Babylon, in the land of the tormentors, Hosmer to the contrary responds "Soul with soul hath kin." While the original psalm speaks of the throne of Jerusalem as the only throne, Hosmer in dialogue seems again to suggest the contrary, instructing us that the throne of God is not anywhere else but in each soul. When the psalmist tell us that if Zion fades, the psalmist's own strength will fade, Hosmer teaches that the "inward sign" will herald the entire earth shining with "Deity." Rather than looking to Jerusalem, he would have us "repair" to the Jerusalem of the soul. See also Psalm 42:2 (NRSV) "My soul thirsts for God, for the living God. When shall I come and behold the face of God?" and ""Be still, and know that I am God!," Psalm 46:10. 'Thou hast visited the earth, thou hast watered it; thou greatly enrichest it," Psalm 65:9 (Darby). "All the earth is full of his glory," Isaiah 6:3 (KJV). "But whenever you pray, go into your room and shut the door and pray to your Father who is in secret," Matthew 6:6 (NRSV). Isaiah 40:22 (KJV), "It is he that sitteth upon the circle of the earth, and the inhabitants thereof are as grasshoppers; that stretcheth out the heavens as a curtain, and spreadeth them out as a tent to dwell in." Isaiah 54:2, "Enlarge the place of thy tent, and let them stretch forth the curtains of thine habitations: spare not, lengthen thy cords, and strengthen thy stakes." The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition or in The New Century Hymnal.

OLD 137TH (C.M.D.)

1. O not in far-off realms of space
the Spir-it has a throne;
But in each heart finds a true place,
yet wait-ing to be known.
Search not, my soul, a-far in vain:
you will not find God there;
Nor in the depths of sha-dows wane,
nor in the heights of air.

2. Thought ans-wer-ing a-lone to thought,
as Soul with soul has kin;
The out-ward God one rec-kons not
who finds not God with-in.
And if the vi-sion comes rich-ly
re-vealed by in-ward sign,
Earth will be full of De-i-ty
and with full glo-ry shine!

3. You shall not want for com-pa-ny,
nor pitch a tent a-lone;
Th'in-dwell-ing God will go free-ly,
and show you of Life's own.
Search not for God a-far in space,
but to your-self re-pair;
Wait then with-in that si-lent grace,
and you shall find Love there!

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May 30, 2005

70R Lead Us, O Lead Us (In Paths of Peace)

Words: William Henry Burleigh (1868); rev. REH (2005); Music: SONG 24 (10.10.10. D), Orlando Gibbons (1623). Psalm 5:8 (NIV),"Lead me, O Lord." Psalm 23:2-3 (NRSV), "[The Lord] leads me beside still waters; he restores my soul. He leads me in right paths for his name’s sake." Luke 1:79, "To guide our feet into the way of peace," see also Isaiah 59:8, Romans 3:27. "Her ways are ways of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace," Proverbs 3:17. The hymn appears in neither Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

SONG 10 (10.10.10. D)

1. Lead us, O lead us, in the paths of peace;
with-out thy guid-ing hand we go as-tray,
and doubts ap-pall, and sor-rows still in-crease;
lead us through Christ, thy true and li-ving way.
Lead us, mothe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace;
Lead us, fathe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace.


2. Lead us, O lead us, in the paths of truth;
un-helped by thee, in er-ror's maze we grope,
while pas-sion strains, and fol-ly dims our youth,
and age comes on, un-cheered by faith and hope.
Lead us, mothe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace;
Lead us, fathe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace.

3. Lead us, O lead us, in the paths of right;
dim-ly we stum-ble when we walk a-lone,
hid in the sha-dows of a fear-some night;
on-ly with thee we jour-ney safe-ly on.
Lead us, mothe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace;
Lead us, fathe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace.

4. Lead us, O lead us, to thy heaven-ly rest,
how-ev-er rough and steep the path-way be;
through joy or sor-row, as fate deem-est best,
un-til our lives are per-fect-ed in thee.
Lead us, mothe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace;
Lead us, fathe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace.

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June 02, 2005

72R I Cannot Find Thee

Original Title: "I Cannot Find Thee," Eliza Scudder (1864), no changes here, LOMBARD STREET, 11.10.11.10., Frederick George Russell (1929). Scudder (1821-1896) was niece of hymnwriter Edmund Sears. Originally a Unitarian, she subsequently became an Episcopalian. The hymn is (unconscionably) not included in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. Psalm 14:1-2, "Fools say in their hearts, 'There is no God' . . . The Lord looks down from heaven on humankind to see if there are any who . . . seek after God." Mark 9:24, "Lord, I believe; help thou mine unbelief." "If I go forward, he is not there; or backward, I cannot perceive him; on the left he hides, and I cannot behold him; I turn to the right, but I cannot see him," Job 23:8-9 (NRSV). "Return, O my soul, to your rest, for the Lord has dealt bountifully with you," Psalm 116:7.

LOMBARD STREET (11.10.11.10.)

1. I can-not find thee. Still on rest-less pin-ion
my spir-it beats the void where thou dost dwell,
I wan-der lost through all thy vast do-min-ion,
and shrink be-neath thy light in-ef-fa-ble.

2. I can-not find thee. E'en when most a-dor-ing,
be-fore thy throne I bend in low-liest prayer;
Be-yond these bounds of thought my thought up-soar-ing
from far-thest quest comes back: thou art not there.


3. Yet high a-bove the lim-its of my see-ing,
and fold-ed far with-in the in-most heart,
and deep be-low the deeps of con-scious be-ing,
thy splen-dor shin-eth: there, O God, thou art.

4. I can-not lose thee. Still in thee a-bid-ing,
the end is clear, how wide so-e'er I roam;
The hand that holds the worlds my steps is guid-ing,
and I must rest at last in thee, my home.

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June 08, 2005

77R One Thought I Have

"One Thought I Have, My Ample Creed," Frederick L. Hosmer, Chicago Unity Hymns and Carols (1880), ST. BERNARD, C.M. No changes here from the lyrics in Hymns of the Spirit Two. Psalm 94:19 (KJV), “In the multitude of my thoughts within me Thy comforts delight my soul;” Psalm 43:3, "O send out thy light and thy truth: let them lead me;" see also Psalms 63:5-6, 77:2; Jeremiah 20:12. Romans 5:4 (NRSV), "[E]ndurance produces character, and character produces hope;" 1 Peter 1:7, "[T]he genuineness of your faith—being more precious than gold that, though perishable, is tested by fire—may be found to result in praise and glory and honor when Jesus Christ is revealed."

ST. BERNARD (C.M.)

1. One thought I have, my am-ple creed,
so deep it is and broad,
and e-qual to my ev-ery need—
it is the thought of God.

2. Each morn un-folds some fresh sur-prise,
I feast at life’s full board;
and ris-ing in my in-ner skies
shines forth the thought of God.

3. At night my glad-ness is my prayer;
I drop my dai-ly load,
and eve-ry care is pillow-ed there
up-on the thought of God.

4. I ask not far be-fore to see,
but take in trust my road;
Life, death, and im-mort-al-i-ty
are in my thought of God.

5. To this their se-cret strength they owed
the mar-tyr's path who trod;
The foun-tains of their pa-tience flowed
from out their thought of God.

6. Be still the light up-on my way,
my pil-grim staff and rod,
my rest by night, my strength by day
O bless-ed thought of God.

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June 09, 2005

78R Who Fathoms the Eternal Thought

Original Title: "Who Fathoms the Eternal Thought," John Greenleaf Whittier; ST. BERNARD, C.M., Tochter Sion (1741). Psalm 46:10 (KJV), "Be still, and know that I am God;" Psalm 100:3, "Know ye that the Lord he is God;" see also Deuteronomy 4:35, 1 Kings 18:39, Ezekiel 34:30, Exodus 18:11. Isaiah 2:11, [T]he haughtiness of men shall be bowed down, and the Lord alone shall be exalted in that day;" see also 2 Corinthians 10:5. 1 Kings 19:12, "And after the earthquake a fire; but the LORD was not in the fire: and after the fire a still small voice;" 1 John 4:8-16 "God is Love." Psalm 78:41, "And still again they tried God, and set bounds to the Holy One of Israel;" see also Psalms 74:17, 148:6; Job 26:10, 38:10.

ST. BERNARD (C.M)

1. Who fath-oms the E-ter-nal Thought?
Which mor-tal hath all planned?
For God is God, who need-eth not
the schemes of hu-man hand.

2. I walk with bare, hushed feet the ground
ye tread with bold-ness shod;
I dare not fix with mete and bound
the love and power of God.

3. I know not what the fu-ture hath
of mar-vel or sur-prise,
as-sured a-lone that life and death
God's mer-cy un-der-lies.

4. I know not where God's is-lands lift
their frond-ed palms in air;
I on-ly know I can-not drift
be-yond such love and care.

5. And so be-side the si-lent sea
I wait the muf-fled oar;
no harm shall ev-er come to me
on o-cean or on shore.

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June 18, 2005

87R My Shepherd's Holy Reign Is Love

Original Title: "The King of Love My Shepherd Is," Henry Williams Baker, New Title: "My Shepherd's Holy Reign Is Love," rev. REH (2006), ST. COLUMBA, 8.7.8.7., Ancient Irish Melody; Paraphrase of Psalm 23. Though it does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, the hymn appears as no. 248 under the name "Such Perfect Love My Shepherd Shows," to the tune DOMINUS REGIT ME (with ST. COLUMBA suggested as an alternative) in The New Century Hymnal.

ST. COLUMBA (8.7.8.7.)

1. My Shep-herd's ho-ly reign is love,
whose good-ness fail-eth ne-ver;
I noth-ing lack if I have love
and love is mine for-ev-er.

2. Where streams of liv-ing wa-ter flow
my ran-somed soul God lead-eth,
and where the ver-dant pas-tures grow,
with food cel-es-tial feedeth.


3. Care-less and fool-ish oft I strayed,
but yet in love God sought me,
and on the shoul-der gent-ly laid,
and home, re-joic-ing, brought me.


4. In death’s deep vale I fear no ill
with thee, dear God, be-side me;
Thy rod and staff my com-fort still,
thy child be-fore to guide me.

5. Thou spread’st a ta-ble in my sight;
Thy unc-tion grace be-stow-eth;
And O what trans-port of delight
from thy pure cha-lice flow-eth!


6. And so through all the length of days
thy good-ness fail-eth ne-ver;
Good Shep-herd, may I sing thy praise
with-in thy house for-ev-er.

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August 17, 2005

145R O God, Our Help in Ages Past

Words: Isaac Watts (1719), alt.; Music: ST. ANNE (C.M.), William Croft (1708); Paraphrase of Psalm 90: 1-5.

ST. ANNE (C.M.)

1. O God, our help in a-ges past,
our hope for years to come,
our shel-ter from the stor-my blast,
and our e-ter-nal home.

2. Be-fore the hills in or-der stood,
or earth re-ceived its frame,
from ev-er-last-ing thou art God,
to end-less years the same.

3. Un-der the sha-dow of thy throne,
the saints have dwelt se-cure;
Suf-fi-cient is thine arm a-lone,
and our de-fense is sure.

4. A thou-sand a-ges in thy sight
are like an eve-ning gone;
Short as the watch that ends the night
be-fore the ris-ing sun.

5. Time, like an ev-er roll-ing stream,
bears its chil-dren a-way;
They fly, for-got-ten, as a dream
dies at the open-ing day.

6. O God, our help in a-ges past,
our hope for years to come,
be thou our guard while trou-bles last,
and our e-ter-nal home. A-men


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November 17, 2005

198R All Creatures of the Earth and Sky/Oh, criaturas del buen Dios

Original Title: "All Creatures of Our God and King," Francis of Assisi (1225), trans. W H. Draper, LASST UNS ERFERUEN, 8.8.4.4.8.8.3.3.4.4.4., Geistliche Kirchengesänge (Cologne 1623); New Title: "All Creatures of the Earth and Sky," recast from Umbrian REH (2005), Spanish J. Miguez Bonino, same hymn tune. Under the latter title it appears to LASST UNS ERFERUEN in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 203, albeit with only five stanzas; with even more changes it appears recast by Miriam Therese Winter as no. 17 in The New Century Hymnal as "To You, O God, All Creatures Sing." An abbreviated adaption by Sharon Anway is included in the UUA's Singing the Journey as No. 1066 to the tune YE BANKS AND BRAES under the name "O Brother Sun," to good reviews. The hymn is sometimes perceived as a take on Psalm 148; there are echoes of other psalms as well (such as Psalm 69); however, it most strongly echoes Psalm 100. The Spanish version, originally entitled "Oh, criaturas del Señor," as no. 22, in Mil Voces para celebrar. The redemption, and in some senses, personalization of Nature by St. Francis has a hint of natural theism about it, which no doubt explains the placement of the no. 1066 in the "Earth-Centered Traditions" section of Singing the Journey; that Christianity in some guises might count amongst such traditions ought not be discounted (as the editors seem to recognize implicitly), given the stewardship of the Earth that Genesis 2 bestows upon humankind.

LASST UNS ERFERUEN (8.8.4.4.8.8.3.3.4.4.4.)

1. All crea~tures~of the earth and sky,
Lift up your voice to heaven on high,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
O ra-diant sun with splen~did beam,
O pre-cious moon with sof-ter gleam!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!

2. O rush~ing~wind that blows so strong,
And storms that sail in skies a-long,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
O cher-ished air, in praise~re-joice,
with stars of even-ing, find a voice!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!

3. O use~ful~wat-er, pure and clear,
Make hum-ble sounds for all to hear,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
O fire so spir-it-ful~and bright,
That gives to us both warmth and light!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!

4. Dear kind~red~earth, who day by day,
Un-folds e'er bless-ings on our way,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
The flowers and fruits that in~you grow,
They ho-ly glo-ry a-lso show!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!


5. And all~dear~souls of ten-der heart,
For-giv-ing oth-ers, take your part,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
All who long pain and sor~row bear,
To the Most Ho-ly cast your care!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!

6. And you~most~kind and gent-le Death,
Wait-ing to hush our lat-est breath,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
Who leads to home the child~of God,
Death's Re-deem-er a way has trod!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!

7. Let all~things~the A-noin-ted bless,
And wor-ship God in hum-ble-ness,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
O praise the Most High, let~praise ring,
Lift up your voice and with all sing!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!


a. Oh, cri-a~tu-ras del buen Dios,
can-tad con me-lo-dio-sa voz:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-le-lu-_ya!
Ar-dien-te sol con tu ful-gor;
oh, lu-na de sua-ve~es-plen-dor:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-la-bad-le!
¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya!


b. Vien-to ve~loz, po-ten-te~a-lud,
nu-bes en cla-ro cie-lo~a-zul:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-le-lu-ya!
Sua-ve, do-ra~ado a-ma-ne-cer;
tu, man-to, no-che~al ex-ten-der:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-la-bad-le!
¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya!


c. Fuen-tes de~a-gua de cris-tal,
a vues-tro cre-a-dor can-tad:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-le-lu-ya!
Oh, fue-go,~e-le-va tu lo-or,
tú que nos da luz y ca-lor:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-la-bad-le!
¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya!

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December 14, 2005

216R Onward, Onward, Though the Region

Original Title: "Onward, Onward, Though the Region," Samuel Johnson (1847), STUTTGART, 8.7.8.7., Christian Friedrich Witt in Psalmodia Sacra (Gotha 1715); New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Neither the hymn nor the tune appears in Singing the Living Tradition. Prior to its publication in Hymns of the Spirit Two, the hymn was known as "Onward, Christian, Though the Region." Though "Samuel Johnson" is the name of a number of historical figures, indeed even more than one hymnist, this Samuel Johnson was a 19th Century American Unitarian. Beyond the allusion to the Lord's Prayer in Matthew 6:10, there is likewise an echo of Psalm 91:11 (AIV): "For God will command God's angels concerning you to guard you in all your ways."

STUTTGART (8.7.8.7.)

1. On-ward, on-ward, though the re-gion
where you are be drear and lone;
God has set a guar-dian le-gion
ver-y near you; press e'er on.

2. By the thorn road, and none o-ther,
is the mount of vi-sion won;
Tread it, shrink not, sis-ter, bro-ther,
Je-sus trod it; press e'er on.


3. By a trust-ful, calm en-deav-or,
guid-ing, cheer-ing, like the sun,
earth-bound heart, ere shall de-liv-er;
Oh, for their sake, press e'er on.

4. Be this world the wis-er, strong-er,
for a life of pain and peace;
While it needs you, oh, no long-er
pray now for a quick re-lease.

5. Pray that ere your du-ty ful-fill,
that you be the faith-ful one,
by the prayer of Je-sus, 'My will
not, but yours, Ab-ba, be done.'

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219R All My Hope On God Is Founded

Originally set to MEINE HOFFNUNG in Hymns of the Spirit Two at no. 219 under the name "All My Hope on God is Founded;" under the same name it appears as no. 408 in The New Century Hymnal to the tune MICHAEL. The hymn echoes Pslam 62; to some extent 71 and others. "Blessed are those who trust in the Lord, whose trust is the Lord," Jeremiah 17:7 (NRSV)

ALBERT (8.7.8.7.7.7.)

1. All my hope on God is found-ed
who does still my trust re-new,
I through change and chance am guid-ed,
on-ly good and on-ly true.
Deep un-known, who a-lone,
calls my heart to be God's own.

2. Our pride and our earth-ly glo-ry,
sword and crown be-tray-ing trust;
what with care and toil we've built up,
tower and tem-ple fall to dust.
But God's power, hour by hour,
is my tem-ple and my tower.

3. God's great good-ness e'er en-dur-ing;
Holy wis-dom pass-ing thought:
Splen-dor, light and life at-tend-ing,
beau-ty that springs out of naught.
Ev-er-more from God's store
new-born worlds rise and a-dore.


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December 15, 2005

228R When Winds Are Raging

Original Title: "When Winds Are Raging," Harriet Beecher Stowe (1855), ZU MEINEM HERRN, 11.10.11.10., adapted from Johann Gottfried Schicht; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), INTERCESSOR, 11.10.11.10.Charles H. H. Parry, Hymns Ancient and Modern, (1904). Harriet Beecher Stowe was a Congregationalist, and professor at Bowdoin College, Maine, in 1850. She wrote many books, including Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852), an anti-slavery novel. "There remains, then, a Sabbath rest for the people of God,” Hebrews 4:9; For [Christ] is our peace," Ephesians 2:14. "[Jesus] said to them, 'Come away to a deserted place all by yourselves and rest a while,'" Mark 6:31. "When [Jesus] saw that they were straining at the oars against an adverse wind, he came towards them early in the morning, walking on the sea . . . Then he got into the boat with them and the wind ceased," Mark 6:48, 50; see also John 6:18-20. "Remember, O Lord, how your servant is taunted; how I bear in my bosom the insults of the peoples, with which your enemies taunt, O Lord, with which they taunted the footsteps of your anointed," Psalm 89:50-51; compare the lyrics "the babble of life’s angry voices."

INTERCESSOR (11.10.11.10)

1. When winds are rag-ing o’er the up-per o-cean,
and bil-lows wild con-tend with an-gry roar,
’tis said, far down, be-low the wild com-mo-tion,
that peace-ful still-ness reign-eth ev-er-more.

2. Far, far be-neath, the noise of tem-pests dieth,
and sil-ver wa-ves chime ev-er peace-ful-ly,
and no rude storm, how fierce so e’er it fli-eth,
dis-turbs the sab-bath of that deep-er sea.

3. So to the heart that knows thy love, O Pur-est!
there is a tem-ple, sa-cred ev-er-more,
and all the bab-ble of life’s an-gry voi-ces
dies in hushed still-ness at its peace-ful door.

4. Far, far a-way, the roar of pas-sion di-eth,
and lov-ing thoughts rise calm and peace-ful-ly,
and no rude storm, how fierce so e’er it fli-eth,
dis-turbs the soul that dwells, Ho-ly, in thee.

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December 20, 2005

249R In Heavenly Love Abiding

Original Title: "In Heavenly Love Abiding," Anna Laetitia Waring (1850), NYLAND, 7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6., Finnish Hymn Melody; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), VALET WILL ICH DIR GEBEN, 7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6., Melchior Teschner (1613). Loose paraphrase of Psalm 23; see also John 15:10, "If ye keep my commandments, ye shall abide in my love." Waring was born a Quaker in Wales; she later became a member of the Church of England.

VALET WILL ICH DIR GEBEN (7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6.)

1. In heaven-ly love a-bid-ing, no change my heart shall fear.
and safe in such con-fid-ing, for noth-ing chang-es here.
The storm may roar with-out me, my heart may low be laid,
but God is round a-bout me; how can I be dis-mayed?

2. Wher-ev-er love may guide me, no want shall turn me back.
My shep-herd is be-side me, and no-thing can I lack.
Your wis-dom's ev-er wak-ing, your sight is al-ways clear,
you know the way you're tak-ing; we'll walk there and then cheer.

3. Green pas-tures are before me, which yet I have not seen.
Bright skies will soon be o'er me, where thick-est clouds have been.
My hope I can-not mea-sure, my path to life is free.
My guide has all my trea-sure, the one who walks with me. A-men.

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January 01, 2006

262R Now Thank We All Our God

Original Title: "Now Thank We All Our God," Martin Rinkart (1636), trans. Catherine Winkworth (1858), NUN DANKET, 6.7.6.7.6.6.6.6., Johann Crüger (1647), harm. Mendelssohn; New Title: "Now Thank We All Our God," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. One of the best-known hymns of the Church Universal. It appears as a two-stanza hymn in Singing the Living Tradition, at no. 32; it appears without parental metaphors in The New Century Hymnal, at no. 419. It echoes both Psalm 67, and other psalms.

NUN DANKET (6.7.6.7.6.6.6.6.)

1. Now thank we all our God, with heart and hands and voi-ces,
who won-drous things has done, in whom this world re-joi-ces;
who from our par-ents’ arms has blessed us on our way
with count-less gifts of love, and still is ours to-day.


2. O may this boun-teous God through all our life be near us,
with ev-er joy-ful hearts and bless-èd peace to cheer us;
and keep us in true grace, and guide us when per-plexed;
and free us from all ills, in this world and the next!

3. All praise and thanks to God the Fa-ther and the Mo-ther;
The one E-ter-nal God, who joins us to each oth-er;
The all-re-deem-ing Life, whom earth and heaven a-dore;
for thus it was, is now, and shall be ev-er-more.

Some congregations may wish to attempt one or more of the original German stanzas (the editors of the website would be happy to create scores for these upon request):

1. Nun dank-et al-le Gott
mit Herz-en, Mund und Händ-en,
der gro-sse Ding-e tut
an uns und al-len End-en;
Der uns von Mut-ter-leib
und Kind-es-bein-en an
un-zäh-lig viel zu gut
bis hie-her hat ge-tan.

2. Der e-wig reich-e Gott
woll uns in uns-erm Leb-en
ein Imm-er fröh-lich Herz
und ed-len Fried-en geb-en,
und uns in sein-er Gnad
er-halt-en fort und fort
und uns aus al-ler Not
er-lös-en hier und dort.

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January 04, 2006

496R-502S All People That On Earth Do Dwell / Doxology

Old and New Titles: "All People That On Earth Do Dwell," William Kethe (1561), rev. REH (2006), OLD HUNDREDTH (L.M.), attributed to Louis Bourgeois, melody from Genevan Psalter (1551). OLD HUNDREDTH is commonly used for doxologies, and is so used in Hymns of the Spirit Two at nos. 496-502. Equivalents are found in Singing the Living Tradition at nos. 365, 370-381, and in The New Century Hymnal at nos. 7, 27, 776-782. While "All People That On Earth Do Dwell" appears in its old form (in B-flat) in Hymns of the Spirit Two, it appears in its modern form here, in F-sharp (the tune found in no. 497 in Hymns of the Spirit Two). Psalm 100, on which no. 496R is based, is the revised lectionary psalm for Proper 6A/Ordinary 11A/Pentecost 4A, Thanksgiving C and Christ the King/Reign of Christ A. Psalm 117 (see 498R below) is used as a lectionary psalm only by Roman Catholics, for Proper 16C/Ordinary 21C. The lyrics below, through no. 502S, may be used productively with many tunes set in L.M. (8.8.8.8.) meter.

OLD HUNDREDTH (Modern Form) (L.M.)


496R William Kethe (1561), rev. REH (2006)

1. All peo-ple that on earth do dwell,
Sing now a-loud with cheer-ful voice;
The Ho-ly One is God in-deed;
With-out our aid who did us make.

2. Serve Life with mirth, O prais-es tell,
Come ye be-fore all and re-joice.
All are God's folk, who doth us feed,
And for whose sheep Love doth us take.

3. O en-ter Wis-dom's gates with praise,
Ap-proach with joy God's courts un-to;
Praise, laud and bless the Name al-ways,
For it is seem-ly so to do.

4. For why? Our Sove-reign God is good,
Whose mer-cy is for-ev-er sure;
Whose truth at all times firm-ly stood,
And shall from age to age en-dure. A-men.

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496S Théodore de Bèze (1519-1605) et d’autres, arranged by REH (2006)

1. Vous, qui sur la terre ha-bi-tez,
Chan-tez à hau-te voix, chan-tez;
Et, de con-cert a-vec les cieux,
Cé-lé-brez son nom glo-ri-eux.

2. C’est un Dieu rem-pli de bon-té,
D’une é-ter-nel-le vér-i-té,
Tou-jours pro-pice à nos sou-haits,
Et sa grâce du-re à ja-mais. A-men.


497R Nahum Tate and Nicholas Brady, rev. REH (2006)

Be thou, O God, ex-alt-ed high;
And as thy glo-ry fills the sky,
So let it be on earth dis-played,
Till Love is here, as there, obeyed. A-men.


498R Isaac Watts (1718), rev. REH (2006), Paraphrase of Psalm 117

1. From all that dwells be-low the skies
Let the Cre-a-tor's praise a-raise;
Let the Re-deem-er's name be sung
Through eve-ry land, by eve-ry tongue.

2. E-ter-nal are thy mer-cies, Love;
E-ter-nal Truth at-tends a-bove;
Thy praise shall sound from shore to shore;
Till suns shall rise and set no more.

3. Your lof-ty themes, all peo-ples, bring,
In songs of praise di-vine-ly sing;
The great sal-va-tion loud proclaim,
And praise now the larg-er hope's name.

4. In eve-ry land be-gin the song;
To every land the strains be-long;
In cheer-ful sounds all voi-ces raise,
And fill the world with loud-est praise. A-men


499R Thomas Ken, alt., see, e.g., "Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above," James 1:17

Praise God, from whom all bless-ings flow;
Praise God, all crea-tures here below;
Praise God, above, ye heaven-ly throng;
Praise God, Cre-a-tor, in your song. A-men.


499S Based on Thomas Ken, rev. REH (no. 479 de El Himnario)

Can-tad al san-to y~u-no Dios,
sus a-la-ban-zas en-ton-dad;
su~e-ter-na hon-ra pro-cla-mad
con voz de~a-mor y gra-ti-tud. A-mén.


499T Anónimo, rev. REH (no. 476 de El Himnario)

A la di-vi-na U-ni-dad,
to-das y to-dos a-la-bad.
Con a-le-grí-a~y gra-ti-tud
su~a-mor y gra-cia ce-le-brad. A-mén.


499U Clément Marot (1543)

Ren-dez à Dieu lou-ange et gloire,
Car il est be-nign et cle-ment,
Qui plus est sa bon-té no-toire,
Du-re per-pé-tu-el-le-ment. A-men.


500R Anonymous (or Charles H. Lyttle per Singing the Living Tradition, no. 365)

Praise God, the Love we all may share;
Praise God, the Beau-ty eve-ry-where;
Praise God, the Hope of Good to be;
Praise God, the Truth that makes us free. A-men.


501R Gerhard Tersteegen (1729), translated by John Wesley (1739), rev. REH (2007)

1. Lo, God is here! let us a-dore,
And joy-ful-ly make this Love's place;
Let all with-in us feel Truth's power;
Let all with-in us seek Life's grace.

2. Lo, God is here! O, day and night,
U-ni-ted choirs of an-gels sing;
To Hope, en-throned a-bove all height,
Heaven's host their no-blest prais-es bring.

3. O Fount of be-ing! may our praise
Thy courts with grate-ful in-cense fill;
Still may we stand be-fore thy face,
Still hear and do thy sove-reign will. A-men.



501S Nils Frykman (1883), translated from Swedish to English by Andrew L. Skoog (1920), alt. REH (2007)

1. Min fram-tids-dat är ljus och lång,
Den räc-ker bor-tom ti-dens tvång,
Där Gud och Lam-met säll jag ser
Och in-gen nöd skal va-ra mer.


2. A fu-ture of but grace sub-lime,
Be-yond the realms of space and time,
Where the re-deem-er I shall see,
And sor-row ne-ver-more shall be. A-men.


502R Arranged by C. W. Reese (1935)

From all that dwell be-low the skies;
Let faith and hope with love a-rise;
Let beau-ty, truth and good be sung
Through eve-ry land, by eve-ry tongue. Amen.


502S Based on Isaac Watts

De to-dos ba-jos el gran sol
sur-ja~es-per-an-za, fe, a-mor
ver-dad, y~be-lle-za can-tan-do,
de ca-da tierr-a, ca-da voz. A-mén.


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January 05, 2006

531S Psalm 67: Bless Us, O God

Original Title: "God Be Merciful Unto Me," Anonymous, first setting, Anonymous, second setting, William Croft; New Title: "Psalm 67: Bless Us, O God," Christine Robinson (2006), arranged by REH (2006), first setting, Anonymous. Christine Robinson is a minister at First Unitarian Church in Albuquerque, New Mexico; her adaptation of the psalms has been part of her daily spiritual exercises since 2003. During a sabbatical from parish ministry, she began to write these psalms on a blog entitled Psalms for a New World, an adaptation using "inclusive language and through modern lenses of ecological awareness, Taoist sensibilites, and post-modern theology." Though the style of these adaptations would generally not be suited for metrical psalms or "four-square" hymn paraphrases, Hymns of the Spirit Two does contain a few Anglican-style plainchants that do not require rigorous rhyming or metrical schemes. This is one of those selections, and the Reverend Robinson's work has been adopted for inclusion here. She has graciously granted permission for same. The normal copyright restrictions on local and congregational use apply as noted below. Psalm 67 is the revised common lectionary psalm for Proper 15A/Ordinary 20A/Pentecost 13A and Easter 6C.

PSALM 67 (Chant)

1. Bless us, O God; whisper~in~our hearts and light our times.
2. Help~us~to~understand~your~love and your law; and~bring~them~to bear on the world’s ills.
3. Let~all~the~people~of~the earth praise you with~all their di-verse voi-ces.
4. Let~them~call~out~the~ten thou-sand names; let~all~nations~praise~you~with the best of their ways.
5. Let~the~peoples~of~the~earth bless the earth and~heal~earth~together;~let~us~all~enjoy each oth-er’s wis-dom.
6. Bless~us,~O~God,~with~your~presence in our hearts; and~in~the~soul~of our na-tion. A-men.

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January 10, 2006

601R O Love, My Inmost Heart

Title: "O Love, My Inmost Heart," The Psalter (1912), rev. REH (2005), GUTERHIRT, C.M., Michael Lonnecke (2005). Though not included in Hymns of the Spirit Two, this minor recasting of Psalm 139 from The Psalter is included here, to a hymn tune written by Michael Lonnecke for the psalm. Lonneke was the found­ing pre­si­dent of the Lou­doun, Vir­gin­ia, Sym­pho­ny, and serves as or­gan­ist for the Ang­li­can Church of the Good Shep­herd and for Trin­i­ty United Meth­od­ist Church, both in Par­is, Vir­gin­ia, near Washington. He has released the tune into the public domain.

GUTERHIRT (C.M.)

1. O Love, my in-most heart and thought
thy search-ing eye doth see;
Wher-e'er I rest, wher-e'er I go,
my ways are known to thee.

2. Each spok-en word, each si-lent thought,
thou, God, dost un-der-stand;
Be-fore me and be-hind art thou,
sus-tain-ing by thy hand.


3. If I the wings of morn-ing take
to some re-mot-est land,
still I shall be up-held by thee
and guid-ed by thy hand.

4. From thee, O God, I can-not hide
though night-time cov-er me;
The even-ing and the light of day
are both a-like to thee.

5. Search me, O Truth, and know my heart,
try me, my thoughts to know;
O lead me, if aim-less I stray,
in paths of life to go.

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January 16, 2006

604R How Good and Pleasant

Paraphrase of Psalm 133.

RAMOTH (8.8.6.8.8.6.)

1. How good and pleas-ant is the sight
when all souls make it a de-light
to dwell in un-i-ty;
O Love is an a-noin-ting oil
that con-se-crates our dai-ly toil
in sweet-est a-mi-ty.

2. O Love in peace and joy di-stills,
as down the slopes of Her-mon’s hills
re-fresh-ing dew des-cends;
O God pro-vides a bless-ing there,
so all shall walk in Truth and share
in life that nev-er ends.

3. How good and pleas-ant is the sight
when all souls make it a de-light
to dwell in un-i-ty;
O now des-cends the spir-it's care,
so all shall in Love's mer-cy share
true life and am-i-ty.

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May 11, 2006

606R O Liberating Love

Title: "O Liberating Love," Sternhold & Hopkins (1812), Psalm 36:5-10, adapted by REH (2007); CAROL, C.M.D., Richard Storrs Willis (1850). These verses constitute the Revised Common Lectionary reading from the Psalms for Epiphany 2C and Holy Week Monday. "Sophia" is Greek for "Wisdom," who appears as a feminine voice of the Divine in Proverbs and other portions of the Bible's Wisdom books. Admittedly an obscure reference for some congregations, it can be replaced by repeating "O Wisdom," though "the Spirit" likewise fits the tune. CAROL is the hymn tune for the well-known Christmas carol "It Came Upon a Midnight Clear," written by Unitarian Edmund Sears in 1849.

CAROL (C.M.D.)

1. O Li-ber-at-ing Love as-cends
a-bove the heavens most high,
as pierc-ing Truth it-self ex-tends
up through the cloud-y sky.
Rise, moun-tains migh-ty, high and brave:
Your peaks of jus-tice call!
Earth's an-i-mals, the o-ceans save,
and hu-mans, all in all.

2. O Wis-dom drifts a-bove all things;
So-phi-a* shall ex-cel
the na-tions’ dreams; be-neath God's wings,
all peo-ple rich-ly dwell.
In high-est tem-ple, all are fed,
a-bun-dance at their will,
and tru-est hopes shall there be spread,
and all shall take their fill.

3. O praise the Fount of bless-ings pure
whose flow shall end-less be;
be-neath Love's Fount the soul is sure
the Light of lights to see.
From ev-ery soul who seeks to know,
let not God's grace de-part:
O may the Spir-it's teach-ings show
to all of o-pen heart.


* or 'the Spirit'

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June 14, 2006

607R O Blessed Seekers

Title: "O Blessed Seekers," United Presbyterian Psalter (1887), Psalm 1, adapted by REH (2007), ST. CATHERINE, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Henri F. Hemy (1865). Psalm 1 is a Revised Common Lectionary text for Epiphany 6C, Proper 18C/Ordinary 23C, Proper 20B/Ordinary 25B, Easter 7B and Proper 25A/Ordinary 30A. SUSSEX CAROL and FOLKINGHAM are alternative hymn tunes.

ST. CATHERINE (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. O bless-ed seek-ers do not stray
on smooth stones laid to tempt our feet,
nor fol-low down a thought-less way,
nor sit up-on the cyn-ic's seat:
But on the Tor-ah take de-light,
and med-i-tate both day and night.

2. They shall be like tall trees in spring
where clear, clean wat-ers gent-ly mist,
which dark-blue ber-ries count-less bring,
and ev-er green the leaves per-sist:
Thus shall pros-per-i-ty re-vive
the good, green Earth, and all hearts thrive.

3. Not so the self-ish lot, for they
as dust, in heat and wind, are spent;
they plun-der through each judg-ment day,
and do not dance through life con-tent:
God's Earth sus-tains a good, green trail;
des-truc-tive ways shall not pre-vail.

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July 12, 2006

608R Soon God's Redeeming Grace Will Come

Title: "Soon God's Redeeming Grace Will Come," Anonymous, rev. REH (2006), WINCHESTER NEW, L.M., Musikalisches Handbuch (1690). Based on Psalm 85:9-13. The original hymn, which does not appear in Hymns of the Spirit Two (1937), is entitled "Lord, Thou Hast Greatly Blessed Our Land," Anonymous, REPENTANCE, L.M., Theodore E. Perkins (1831-1912). Psalm 85, or parts thereof, constitutes a lectionary reading for Proper 14A/Ordinary 19A, Advent 2B, Proper 10B/Ordinary 15B, and Proper 12C/Ordinary 17C.

WINCHESTER NEW (L.M.)

1. Soon God's re-deem-ing grace will come;
all souls new-mind-ed will be-come;
and glo-ry through our land shall dwell,
when we do heed Love's teach-ings well.

2. Now truth a-grees with mer-cy's bliss;
the law and peace come forth to kiss;
be-hold the truth from earth a-rise,
with jus-tice shin-ing from the skies.

3. The Ho-ly will send bles-sings down;
green har-vests all the land shall crown;
wide whole-some-ness be-fore us lies;
our sure foot-steps are Life's sur-mise. A-men.

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609R Your Burning Love

Title: "Your Burning Love," adaped by REH (2007) from The Psalter (1912), Psalm 30; MEIRIONYDD, 7.6.7.6. D, William Freeman Lloyd (1840). Psalm 30 is an appointed reading for Epiphany 6B, Proper 8B/Ordinary 13B, Easter 3C, Proper 5C/Ordinary 10 and Proper 9C/Ordinary 14C.

MEIRIONYDD (7.6.7.6. D)

1. Your burn-ing love de-liv-ered;
in sweet love songs I cried;
my harsh-est cri-tics suf-fered
in si-lence midst my slide.
O Hard-ened Truth, I sought you;
your strength my heart did save;
O you did teach me wis-dom,
whose path is long and brave.

2. Love's ho-ly name re-mem-ber,
all souls, give thanks and praise!
Life's sor-rows last a mo-ment;
God's fa-vor lasts al-ways;
for sor-row, like a pil-grim,
may come to stay the night,
but joy the soul will glad-den
when dawns the mor-ning light.

3. In gol-den days I boast-ed,
"A moun-tain I re-main!"
O God, with pleas-ing fa-vor,
the high-land crests sus-tain.
Then my life near-ly crumb-led,
no more I heard you speak,
and cried a-loud, "O dear God;"
your mys-tery did I seek.

4. Who'd pro-fit if we per-ished,
if our lives were not spared?
Would dust then sing out prais-es;
how would Truth be de-clared?
O God, send down com-pass-ion,
and our de-si-res hear;
the heart needs you as lov-er:
O Spir-it soon ap-pear!

5. Lo, heart-ache turns to dan-ces,
to you great thanks all raise,
who took a-way this sad-ness,
and lift-ed all in praise!
So now, no lon-ger si-lent,
with burn-ing love all sing:
"O Sweet-est God, for-ev-er,"
and thanks on high do bring!

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July 14, 2006

610R My Soul Shall Bless the Soul of All

Title: "My Soul Shall Bless the Soul of All," William Cowper, Olney Hymns (London: 1779), TRURO, L.M., Thomas Williams, Psalmodia Evangelica, (1789); rev. REH (2006). Paraphrase of Pslam 34:1-8, which is a lectionary reading for All Saints A, Proper 14B/Ordinary 19B, and Proper 25B/Ordinary 30B.

TRURO (L.M.)

1. My soul shall bless the Soul of all,
my praise shall climb to God's a-bode;
O Ho-ly One, whose name I call,
the great Su-preme, the lov-ing God.

2. With-out be-gin-ning, or de-cline,
Ob-ject of faith, and not of sense;
e-ter-nal a-ges saw you shine,
and shine e-ter-nal a-ges hence.

3. Of all the crowns O God you bear,
for-give-ness is your dear-est claim;
that gra-cious sound well-pleased you hear,
who owns "God-with-us" as a name.


4. A cheer-ful con-fi-dence I feel,
my well-placed hopes with joy I see;
my bo-som glows with heaven-ly zeal
to wor-ship one who loves free-ly.

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July 19, 2006

612R God of All Worlds

Original Title: "Lord of All Worlds," John Quincy Adams (1767-1848); New Title: "God of All Worlds," rev. REH (2006), DEUS TUORUM MILITUM, L.M.D., Grenoble Antiphoner (1753). Paraphrase of Psalm 14. Adams was the sixth President of the United States. A Unitarian, he wrote metrical versions of the psalms and several hymns. He is buried at the historic First Parish Church (Unitarian) in Quincy, Massachusetts.

DEUS TUORUM MILITUM (L.M.D.)

1. God of all worlds, let thanks and praise
to you for-ev-er fill my soul;
with bles-sings you have crowned my days,
my heart, my head, my hand con-trol.
O, let no vain pre-sump-tions rise,
no im-pious mur-mur in my heart,
to crave what-e'er your will de-nies,
or shrink from what your hands im-part.

2. Your child am I, and not an hour,
re-vol-ving in the orbs a-bove,
but brings some to-ken of your power,
but brings some to-ken of your love;
and shall this bo-som dare re-pine,
in night time dare de-ny the dawn,
or spurn the trea-sures of the mine,
be-cause one dia-mond is with-drawn?

3. Some souls do doubt, and not a-lone
your be-ing, God, and bound-less might,
but doubt the fir-ma-ment, your throne,
and doubt the sun’s me-ri-dian light;
and doubt the fa-shion of one's frame,
the voice one hears, the breath one draws;
O way-laid mor-tals, who pro-claim
ef-fects un-num-bered with-out cause!

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July 24, 2006

613R Behold, O My Whole Heart

Title: "Behold, O My Whole Heart," Brady & Tate (1696), Psalm 138, adapted by REH (2007), MORNING SONG (CONSOLATION), C.M.D., Repository of Sacred Music (1813). Psalm 138 is a lectionary reading for Epiphany 5C, Proper 12C/Ordinary 17C, Proper 16A/Ordinary 21A, Proper 5B/Ordinary 10B. Most English versions translate the Hebrew in the first verse as "gods," though it equally means "goddess;" this is reflected in the lyrics below. Alternative hymn tunes include OLD 29TH, C.M.D., ALL SAINTS NEW, C.M.D., ST. THEODULPH, C.M.D.

MORNING SONG (CONSOLATION)(C.M.D.)

1. Be-hold, O my whole heart I'll bring,
and praise to God pro-claim;
be-fore the Queen of life I'll sing,
and bless the liv-ing name.
I'll cel-e-brate the sa-cred lights,
where-ev-er Love is found,
and bow my heart toward ho-ly sites,
where Wis-dom's words a-bound.

2. O God, you lend a lis-tening ear
when I cry out my heart;
and when my strength lies stuck in fear,
Love makes my dread de-part.
When lead-ers Wis-dom do pur-sue:
their hearts shall shout out praise.
Souls sing-ing of a king-dom true
shall show us of Love's ways.

3. The Most High treats the proud with scorn;
the poor, God tends their way:
And when in life as dan-gers warn,
grant safe-ty, come what may!
O Love whose pur-pos-es do last,
shall be my dwell-ing place;
And, mind-ful of each pro-mise past:
O Love, fill Earth and space.

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July 28, 2006

615R All Praise the Life (Which Gives Us Voice)

Original Title: "I'll Praise My Maker," Isaac Watts (1719), OLD 113TH, 8.8.8.8.8.8., attributed to Matthäus Greiter, Strassburger Kirchenamt (1525); New Title: "All Praise the Life (Which Gives Us Voice)," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. A paraphrase of Psalm 146, all or parts of which are a lectionary reading for Advent 3A, Proper 18B/Ordinary 23B, Proper 26B/Ordinary 31B, Proper 27B/Ordinary 32B, Proper 5C/Ordinary 10C and Proper 21C/Ordinary 26C. Though the hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal, but some may find the John Wesley version of Isaac Watts' hymn, that appears as no. 253 in a further revised version (1988) in The Presbyterian Hymnal (1990), "I'll Praise My Maker," OLD 113TH, of use in their local or congregational settings.

OLD 113TH (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. All praise the Life which gives us voice!
Sing out songs, cease-less-ly re-joice!
Praise shall em-ploy our no-blest drives;
rul-ers de-part; their pomp, their power;
vain thoughts, all van-ish in the hour:
But Time's e-ter-ni-ty sur-vives.

2. Hap-py are all whose dreams re-ly
on An-cients' God who made their sky,
and earth, and seas, with all their train:
whose truth for-ev-er stands se-cure,
who frees cap-tives and feeds the poor;
we serve them too, else trust in vain.

3. Di-vine vis-ion aids ev-ery eye;
Our So-phi-a sooths the mind's cry;
O God, O Wis-dom, ev-er reigns:
Let eve-ry tongue, let eve-ry age,
in Love's ex-al-ted work en-gage;
Sing praise in ev-er-last-ing strains!

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August 03, 2006

617R If God Had Not Been On Our Side

Title: "If God Had Not Been On On Our Side," Martin Luther (1524), translation of "Wär’ Gott nicht mit uns diese Zeit," composite translators, rev. REH (2006), WÄR’ GOTT NICHT MIT UNS, 8.7.8.7.8.8.7., Gesangbuch (Wittenberg: 1537). Paraphrase of Psalm 124, a lectionary reading for Proper 16A/Ordinary 21A and Proper 21B/Ordinary 26B.

WÄR’ GOTT NICHT MIT UNS (8.7.8.7.8.8.7.)

1. If God had not been on our side
and had not come to aid us,
would our foes with their power and pride
then sure-ly have dis-mayed us?
Would we, God's flock, then have to fear
the threats of those both far and near
who act in might a-gainst us?

2. Such wrath, dear God, do not per-mit,
it sure-ly would con-sume us
and as a deep and yawn-ing pit
with life and limb en-tomb us.
Like those o’er whom deep wa-ter rolls,
that wrath then would en-gulf our souls
and, like a flood, o’er-whelm us.

3. Bless A-do-nai, who foils our threats
that they might not de-vour us.
Our souls, like birds, es-cape their nets,
they could not ov-er-power us.
The snare is brok-en; we are free!
Our help is ev-er, God, in thee,
who made the earth and heav-en.

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618R Bendeciré a Jehová en todo tiempo

"Bendeciré a Jehová en todo tiempo," Salmo 34:1-4, del Himnario de la Iglesia Evangélica Presbiteriana y Reformada "Betel," en Lima, Perú (ieprp_betel@yahoo.com), 11.11.11.11. The first part of Psalm 34 is a lectionary reading for All Saints A, Proper 14B/Ordinary 19B and Proper 25B/Ordinary 30B.

1. Ben-de-ci-ré~a Je-ho-vá~en to-do tiem-po:
Su~a-la-ban-za de en bo-ca es-ta-rá
en Je-ho-vá se glor-iar-á mi al-ma;
Lo oi-rán los man-sos y se~a-le-gra-rán.

2. En-gran-de-ced a Je-ho-vá con-mi-go,
Y ex-al-te-mos a-un a su nom-bre.
Bus-qué a Je-ho-vá y Dios me~o-yó,
Y de to-dos mis tem-or-es me li-bró.

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January 08, 2007

621R In Love I Put My Highest Trust

Title: In Love I Put My Highest Trust, Psalm 71:1-6, from The New Verson, Brady and Tate (1698), adapted REH (2007); OLD 29TH, C.M.D., Anglo-Genevan Psalter (1556), harmony, Scottish Psalter (1635). Alternative (and perhaps better known) hymn tunes to consider include Vaughn Williams' KINGSFOLD, C.M.D., and FOREST GREEN, C.M.D., both of which may be found in Singing the Living Tradition and in The New Century Hymnal. Psalm 71 is an appointed Revised Common Lectionary reading for Epiphany 4C and Proper 16C/Ordinary 21C, as well as for the Tuesday during Holy Week. The lyrics also echo Psalm 139:13 (NRSV), "You knit me in my mother's womb." The lyrics address, in a broad way, the often unchurchly topic of bullying, an area of resurgent concern for young men and women in the Internet age. Advice to bullies and their victims might include: "Do not repay anyone evil for evil, but take thought for what is noble in the sight of all," Romans 12:19; see also Proverbs 24:7. "Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who abuse you," Luke 6:27-28. This ode to Love echoes too the Greek Testament, in words that have come to us as "Deus caritas est," or "God is Love," words of particular significance for many Universalists. 1 John 4:16

OLD 29TH (C.M.D.)

1. In Love I put my high-est trust,
de-fend-ing hearts from chains;
And who but you can save my soul
as I cry out your names?
You are the strong and sweet-est place,
to which all souls re-sort;
And Love's de-mands do keep me safe;
they are my rock and port.

2. From cru-el taunt and cru-el word,
from earl-iest days of youth,
my heart you ev-er soothed, O God;
My life still lives in you.
Love's tough-ened care did safe-ly guard
my ten-der school-yard days;
You knit me deep with-in your womb;
Now life is con-stant praise!

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February 04, 2007

622R O Wisdom Reigns Supreme

Title: "O Wisdom Reigns Supreme," United Presbyterian Psalter (1887), Psalm 99, adapted REH (2007), ST. MICHAEL, S.M.D., Louis Bourgeois (1551), adapted William Crotch (1836). Psalm 99 is the lectionary reading for Transfiguration A & C, and Proper 24A/Ordinary 29A. Alternative tunes include ICH HALTE TREULICH STILL, S.M.D. and ST. AUGUSTINE, S.M.D. ST. MICHAEL, usually in S.M., should be well-known to most Unitarian Universalists, as the tune to the hymn "Where Is Our Holy Church?"

ST. MICHAEL (S.M.D.)

1. O Wis-dom reigns su-preme,
that all the world may wake,
though dwell-ing with the wing-ed ones,
the Earth's deep core may shake.
Lies in Je-ru-sa-lem,
the Sove-reign's sa-cred throne,
where three creeds sing one ho-ly Name,
that ev-er Life be known.

2. Our God does mer-cy love,
and jus-tice does main-tain:
In-te-gri-ty and eth-ics too
in Ja-cob did sus-tain.
May all sing prais-es high,
and Earth in prais-es laud:
All at the foot-stool wor-ship-ing,
for ho-ly is our God.

3. O Mos-es, Aar-on, priests,
all who on true Love call,
and Sa-muel trust-ing too in God,
who then an-swered them all.
Through pil-lar of Earth's clouds,
the Ho-ly One did speak:
who did set forth a cov-e-nant,
the Tor-ah, hence to keep.

4. O God, our gra-cious God,
who does a mes-sage send;
Love grants us par-don for our deeds,
that jus-tice may im-pend.
May all sing prais-es high,
and Earth in prais-es laud,
and cel-e-brate the moun-tain tops,
for ho-ly is our God.

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February 07, 2007

623R All Who With Full Intent and Mind

Words: William Kethe (circa 1561), Psalm 91:1-2, 8-16, adapted REH (2007) ; Music: WER DA WONET (L.M.D.), Vehe’s Gesangbüchlein (1537); Alternative: ANGLO-GENEVAN PSALM 91, L.M.D., French melody (1561). Lent 1C, Proper 21C, Proper 24B. God is Love, 1 John 4:8, 16.

WER DA WONET (L.M.D.)

ANGLO-GENEVAN PSALM 91 (L.M.D.)

1. All who with full in-tent and mind
in Love's high peaks by faith do dwell:
whose gra-cious pow-er all shall find
the saf-est place to serve them well.
Now say un-to our God will I,
"O you in-deed are hope most sure:
For God is Love, thus will I cry
my trust in you for-ev-er more!"

2. O all shall cer-tain-ly be-hold
what jus-tice have the self- ish earned;
but when true Love is your strong-hold,
lo, hence to Life the soul is turned.
Then will no dan-gers vis-it you,
nor will your tent or ground-cloth stir;
for come the an-gels forth a-new,
and to their strength all do de-fer.

3. So fierce-ly they shall you de-fend,
that harm you shall be sure of none,
nor you so much as once of-fend,
nor dash your foot a-gainst a stone.
You shall a-mongst the li-ons tread,
the dra-gon and the asp al-so;
O you shall nev-er live in dread,
as you a-mongst them safe-ly go.

4. For so the Sove-reign One a- bove,
bold-ly de-clares, "I know your name."
I thus will lift my praise to Love,
and foes con-found who seek Love's shame.
On me shall Life call when in need,
and I will hear though still in doubt;
in trou-bles I res-pond with speed,
that God be glor-i-fied through-out.

5. The years that shall be Time's de-sire,
that we in grace full-well may spend;
our health and life and love en-tire,
will serve all well and have no end.
All who with full in-tent and mind
in Love's high peaks by faith do dwell:
whose gra-cious pow-er all shall find
the saf-est place to serve them well.

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