April 21, 2005

43R O God, Our Dwelling Place

Original Title: "O God, Our Dwelling Place," Lewis Gilbert Wilson (1912), ST. EDMUND, 6.4.6.4.6.6.6.4., Arthur Seymour Sullivan (1872); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), DOWN AMPNEY, 6.6.11.6.6.11., Ralph Vaughan Williams (1906). Lewis Gilbert Wilson was an American Unitarian. He wrote about Hopedale, Massachusetts, a 19th cenutry communal experiment in "Practical Christianity," founded by Universalist Adin Ballou. He likewise edited "The Christian Doctrine of Non-Resistance," written by Adin Ballou and Leo Tolstoi. Arthur Seymour Sullivan, an Englishman, was one-half of the musical team of Gilbert and Sullivan. The hymn appears in neither Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. The hymn echoes many psalms, including in the last stanza Psalm 51:10, 15, "Create in me a pure heart, O God, and renew a steadfast spirit within me. . . . O Lord, open my lips, and my mouth will declare your praise." Verse 2 resonates with Psalm 36:9, "For with you is the fountain of life." Verse One, 'From his dwelling place [God] watches all who live on earth . . . the eyes of the Lord are on those who fear him, on those whose hope is in his unfailing love," see Psalm 33:14, 18; Psalm 148. Psalm 32:7, "You are a hiding place for me; you preserve me from trouble."

DOWN AMPNEY (6.6.11.6.6.11.)

1. O God, our dwell-ing place,
our times are ev-er thine;
Through all our years we trace love's large de-sign.
Lure us to high de-sire
and with ce-les-tial fire
in all our souls in-spire thy love di-vine.

2. O Fount, un-spent and pure,
the faint-ing hu-man soul
thou canst from death re-store, its grief con-sole.
Health thou a-lone canst give;
O let all hearts re-ceive!
Bid us a-rise and live, by thee made whole.

3. Bless thou our thought of thee,
to err-or weak-ly prone;
in hol-ier song may we thy name en- throne.
By widen-ing du-ties cast
with-in thy pur-pose vast,
may we know thee at last as we are known.

4. In ser-vice strong and fair
forth may we brave-ly go;
Thy grand realm to pre-pare, thy truth to know.
For tem-ples let us raise;
Pure hearts that sing thy praise;
And un-to end-less days thy glo-ry show.

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May 30, 2005

70R Lead Us, O Lead Us (In Paths of Peace)

Words: William Henry Burleigh (1868); rev. REH (2005); Music: SONG 24 (10.10.10. D), Orlando Gibbons (1623). Psalm 5:8 (NIV),"Lead me, O Lord." Psalm 23:2-3 (NRSV), "[The Lord] leads me beside still waters; he restores my soul. He leads me in right paths for his name’s sake." Luke 1:79, "To guide our feet into the way of peace," see also Isaiah 59:8, Romans 3:27. "Her ways are ways of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace," Proverbs 3:17. The hymn appears in neither Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

SONG 10 (10.10.10. D)

1. Lead us, O lead us, in the paths of peace;
with-out thy guid-ing hand we go as-tray,
and doubts ap-pall, and sor-rows still in-crease;
lead us through Christ, thy true and li-ving way.
Lead us, mothe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace;
Lead us, fathe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace.


2. Lead us, O lead us, in the paths of truth;
un-helped by thee, in er-ror's maze we grope,
while pas-sion strains, and fol-ly dims our youth,
and age comes on, un-cheered by faith and hope.
Lead us, mothe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace;
Lead us, fathe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace.

3. Lead us, O lead us, in the paths of right;
dim-ly we stum-ble when we walk a-lone,
hid in the sha-dows of a fear-some night;
on-ly with thee we jour-ney safe-ly on.
Lead us, mothe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace;
Lead us, fathe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace.

4. Lead us, O lead us, to thy heaven-ly rest,
how-ev-er rough and steep the path-way be;
through joy or sor-row, as fate deem-est best,
un-til our lives are per-fect-ed in thee.
Lead us, mothe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace;
Lead us, fathe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace.

Word Score
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Noteowrthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2005 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

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June 13, 2005

82R Thou Hidden Love of God

Original Title: "Thou Hidden Love of God," Gerhard Tersteegen (1729) trans. John Wesley (1738) GOTTLOB, ES GEHT, 8.8.8.8.8.8., German Chorale, harm. J. S. Bach (1747); New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2008), same hymn tune.

GOTTLOB, ES GEHT (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. Thou hid-den love of God, whose height,
Whose depth un-fath-omed no one knows,
I see from far thy beau-teous light,
In-ly I sigh for thy re-pose;
My heart is pained, nor can it be
At rest, till it finds rest in thee.

2. Thy se-cret voice in-vites me still
The sweet-ness of thy yoke to prove;
And fain I would: but though my will
Seems fixed, yet wide my pas-sions rove;
Yet hind-ranc-es strew all the way;
I aim at thee, yet from thee stray.

3. 'Tis mer-cy all, that thou hast brought
My mind to seek true peace in thee;
Yet, while I seek but find thee not,
No peace my wand-'ring soul shall see.
Oh, when shall all my wand-'rings end,
And all my steps to thee-ward tend?

4. O Love, thy sove-reign aid im-part,
To save me from low-thought-ed care;
Chase this self-will through all my heart,
Through all its la-tent maz-es there;
Make me thy du-teous child, that I
Cease-less may Ab-ba, Ab-ba, cry!

5. Each mo-ment draw from earth a-way
My heart which low-ly waits thy call;
Speak to my in-most soul and say
'I am thy Love, thy God, thy All.'
To feel thy power, to hear thy voice,
To taste thy love, be all my choice.

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Noteworthy Composer File

Psalm 5:3 (NRSV), "O Lord, in the morning you hear my voice; in the morning I plead my case to you, and watch;" Psalm 46:10, "Be still, and know that I am God!;" Psalm 108:4, "For your steadfast love is higher than the heavens, and your faithfulness reaches to the clouds;" Psalm 131:2, Matthew 5:7, “Blessed are the merciful, for they will receive mercy;" Matthew 14:23, [H]e went up the mountain by himself to pray. When evening came, he was there alone;" Mark 1:35; 1 Corinthians 7:29-31; Ephesians 5:15-20.

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2008 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

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A PDF file can be prepared in a larger font should users wish to have a printout extend to two pages upon request. Differences from Hymns of the Spirit Two are truly minimal; in the first verse, the original reads "no man know;" in the third verse, it reads "her peace in thee;" in the fourth verse, "Abba, Father, cry!" I considered changing the third versed to "Abba, Amma, cry!," but rejected this in favor of something more "historically" accurate. Whatever gendered references there are to the divine here are subtle, and one can only hope more than acceptable given their provenance. In terms of balance, the "hidden love of God" and "thy secret voice" are considerably feminine images by way of contrast.

The Webmaster generally makes inquiry to anyone who may wish to undertake a translation of Gerhard Tersteegen's hymn, entitled "Verborgne Gottesliebe du," into something more (post-)modern while maintaining the integrity of the work.

The tune here, GOTTLOB, ES GEHT, appears to be related to an earlier hymn, GOTTLOB ES GEHT NUNMEHR ZU ENDE, 8.8.8.8. The former repeats the first eight measures of the later. The score of the hymn tune here is in F-sharp while in Hymns of the Spirit Two in appears in B-flat and in a slightly simpler rhythm.

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