April 28, 2005

48R Spirit of God, Descend Upon My Heart

Original Title: "Spirit of God, Descend Upon My Heart," George Croly (1854), first tune, SONG 12, 10.10.10.10., rhythmed altered from Orlando Gibbons, second tune, MORECAMBE, 10.10.10.10., ascribed to Federick Cook Atkinson (1870); New Title: Same hymn title, no changes to lyrics, SONG 12, 10.10.10.10. Croly was a graduate of Dublin University; he later took holy orders. He left Ireland in 1810 for London. His works include Scenes from Scripture and Other Poems (1851) and Psalms and Hymns for Public Worship (1854). The original version consisted of five verses; the fourth verse was not included in Hymns of the Spirit Two. "Live by the spirit, I say ... If you are led by the spirit, you are not subject to the law," Galatians 5:16; see also 18-25. "Your memorable sayings are proverbs of ashes, your defenses are defenses of clay," Job 13:12. Matthew 3:16, "And Jesus, when he was baptized, went up straightway out of the water: and, lo, the heavens were opened unto him, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove, and lighting upon him," see also John 1:32; Matthew 22:37, Acts 8:17. Proverbs 1:28, "Then shall they call upon me, but I will not answer; they shall seek me early, but they shall not find me." The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but does appear, in revised form in five stanzas, to the tune MORECAMBE, as no. 290, in The New Century Hymnal.

SONG 22 (10.10.10.10.)

1. Spir-it of God, de-scend up-on my heart;
Wean it from earth; through all its puls-es move;
Stoop to my weak-ness, might-y as thou art;
And make me love thee as I ought to love.

2. I ask no dream, no pro-phet ec-sta-sies,
no sud-den rend-ing of the veil of clay,
no an-gel vi-si-tant, no open-ing skies;
But take the dim-ness of my soul a-way.

3. Teach me to feel that thou art al-ways nigh;
Teach me the strug-gles of the soul to bear.
To check the ris-ing doubt, the re-bel sigh,
teach me the pa-tience of un-an-swered prayer.

4. Teach me to love thee as thine an-gels love,
one ho-ly pas-sion fill-ing all my frame;
The kind-ling of the heaven-de-scend-ed dove,
My heart an al-tar, and thy love the flame. A-men.

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Shadows for dimness?

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May 09, 2005

54R From Heart to Heart

Original Title: "From Heart to Heart, Creed to Creed," William Channing Gannett (1875), ST. FLAVIAN, C.M., John Day's Psalter (1562), alternative tune, ARLINGTON, C.M., Thomas Augustine Arne (1762); New Title: "From Heart to Heart," rev. REH (2005), ST. FLAVIAN, C.M. Neither Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal includes the hymn. Isaiah 43:19, "A way will I make in the wilderness, and rivers in the desert!" Jeremiah 31:32-33, "But this shall be the covenant . . . I will put my law within them and write it in their hearts." "I will give them a new heart, and I will put a new spirit within them," Ezekiel 11:19. Psalm 1:3, "And he shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of water;" see also Jeremiah 17:8, Psalm 46:4. Pray for one another, so that you may be healed," James 5:16. The hymn does not appear either in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

ST. FLAVIAN (C.M.)

1. From heart to heart, from faith to faith,
the hid-den riv-ers run,
and quick-en all the a-ges down,
which binds us, eve-ry-one.

2. The streams of faith, whose source is God,
whose source, the sound of prayer,
whose mead-ows are the ho-ly lives
up-spring-ing eve-ry-where.

3. And still they move, a broad-ening flood,
and fresh-er, full-er grow.
A sense as if the sea were near,
towards which the ri-vers flow.

4. O you who are the se-cret Source
that ris-es in each soul,
who are the O-cean, too, and yours,
that ev-er deep-ening roll! A-men.

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December 04, 2005

206S Oh Dios, pedimos que nos des

Título original: "Oh nuestro Padre, nuestro Dios," Autor desconocido, ST. AGNES, 8.6.8.6., John Bacchus Dykes (1866); Título nuevo: "Oh Dios, pedimos que nos des," alterado REH (2005), misma tonada.

The hymn "Oh nuestro Padre, nuestro Dios," appears in the United Methodist hymnal Mil voces para celebrar as no. 368, originally with four stanzas, as a hymn for New Years', with no known author, and without copyright. Here the first stanza has been removed (along with any gender references to God), the remaining stanzas re-arranged, as a general-use hymn. Though it was written to ST. AGNES, it is not a translation of 206R herein, direct or otherwise. A relatively close English translation follows, which is meant to give an idea of the Spanish lyrics, but which is not meant to be sung. The lyrics echo the "powers and principalities" language of Paul in Colossians 2:15; there is also a hint of the third petition of the Lord's pray or the prayer of Jesus in Matthew 6:10. A living faith, firm hope, and burning love also suggest St. Paul. Colossians 1:5-8, 1 Corithians 13:3, 1 Thessalonians 1:3. Likewise the passing away of time and goods suggest the passing away of the "temporal" and the persistence of the "eternal" alluded to in 2 Corinthians 4:18.

ST. AGNES (8.6.8.6.)

1. Oh Dios, pe-di-mos que nos des
en tu ser-vi-cio ar-dor;
fir-me es-pe-ran-za,
vi-va fe y más ar-dien-te a-mor.

2. Haz-nos sen-tir la va-ni-dad
de cuan-to e-xis-te a-quí;
gran-de-zas, bie-nes, po-tes-tad
pe-re-ce-rán al fin.


3. El cie-lo, el or-be, el mun-do es-tán
di-cien-do tu bon-dad;
la vi-da, el tiem-po pa-sa-rán
se-gún tu vo-lun-tad. A-mén.

Translation of the Spanish (not to be sung):

1. O God, we ask that you give us
in your most burning service
firm hope, a living faith,
and more ardent love.

2. Make known to us the vanity
of so much that exists here;
Majesty, goods, power
will perish in the end.


3. The heavens, the globe, the world,
are speaking your goodness;
Life and time will pass
according to your will. Amen.

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December 05, 2005

207R When Love's Sovereign Sojourned (Here)

Original Title: "When the Lord of Love Was Here," Stopford Augustus Brooke (1881), MISERICORDE (7.7.5.7.7.5.), Robert L. Sanders (1932); New Title: "When Love's Sovereign Sojourned (Here)," rev. REH (2005), Same hymn tune. Neither hymn nor tune appears in either Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. Brooke was a 19th Century Irish writer and churchman, first ordained in the Church of England, but later he officiated as a Unitarian minister at Bedford chapel, Bloomsbury. The hymn recollects the words of Jesus that we are to "love God," and "love our neighbors" (even our enemies) as ourselves, and that all the law and prophets rest on these two commandments. Matthew 22:37, Mark 12:30, Luke 10:27. Also echoed in the hymn is 1 John 4:19-21, which records that Jesus "loved us" before we loved him. The "parables of God" of which Brooke speaks are found through out the gospels, but above all in Mark, chapter 4:1-20, in a series of stories regarding seeds, birds, soil, and the transforming and self-producing power of the earth. "The outcasts" thronging to the Healer bring to mind the story of the Syrophoenician woman in Mark 7:26-30, who, comparing herself with a "dog," argues with Jesus that he heal her daughter as even "dogs under the table eat the children's crumbs;" Jesus agrees. The UUA's Skinner House advises that it considers MISERICORDE to be in the public domain.

MISERICORDE (7.7.5.7.7.5.)

1. When Love's Sove-reign so-journed here,
hap-py hearts grew ev-er near,
though one heart was sad;
Worn and lone-some for our sake,
yet still turned a-side to make
all the wea-ry glad.

2. One who walked the fields, and drew
from the flowers and birds and dew
pa-ra-bles of God;
For with-in that heart of love
all the souls on earth did move,
God had an a-bode.

3. All the out-casts thronged to hear,
all the sor-row-ful drew near
to the Hea-ler's care;
deep and ear-thy were the ways
from which lov-ing grew to praise,
and from giv-ing, prayer.

4. O, be ours that power to keep
in the ver-y heart of grief,
and in tri-al, love;
In our weak-ness to be wise,
and through sor-rows to a-rise
to our God a-bove. A-men.

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June 14, 2006

607R O Blessed Seekers

Title: "O Blessed Seekers," United Presbyterian Psalter (1887), Psalm 1, adapted by REH (2007), ST. CATHERINE, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Henri F. Hemy (1865). Psalm 1 is a Revised Common Lectionary text for Epiphany 6C, Proper 18C/Ordinary 23C, Proper 20B/Ordinary 25B, Easter 7B and Proper 25A/Ordinary 30A. SUSSEX CAROL and FOLKINGHAM are alternative hymn tunes.

ST. CATHERINE (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. O bless-ed seek-ers do not stray
on smooth stones laid to tempt our feet,
nor fol-low down a thought-less way,
nor sit up-on the cyn-ic's seat:
But on the Tor-ah take de-light,
and med-i-tate both day and night.

2. They shall be like tall trees in spring
where clear, clean wat-ers gent-ly mist,
which dark-blue ber-ries count-less bring,
and ev-er green the leaves per-sist:
Thus shall pros-per-i-ty re-vive
the good, green Earth, and all hearts thrive.

3. Not so the self-ish lot, for they
as dust, in heat and wind, are spent;
they plun-der through each judg-ment day,
and do not dance through life con-tent:
God's Earth sus-tains a good, green trail;
des-truc-tive ways shall not pre-vail.

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