March 10, 2005

10S ¡Oh santo, eterno Dios!

Título: ¡Oh santo, eterno Dios!, autor anónimo, traductor Vicente Mendoza ("Come Thou Almighty King," en inglés), alt. REH (2007), ITALIAN HYMN, 6.6.4.6.6.6.6.4., Felice de Giardini (1769). "Como aquel a quien consuela su madre, así os consolaré yo a vosotros," Isaías 66:13 (Reina-Valera 1960), veáse también 2 Esdras 1:28-30, Eclesiástico 15:1-3. "¡Jerusalén, Jerusalén, ... cuántas veces quise juntar a tus hijos, como la gallina a sus polluelos debajo de sus alas!," Lucas 13:31-35. "La sabiduría [sofía, en griego] clama en las calles, alza su voz en las plazas," Proverbios 1:20. Aparece sin revisiones como número 11 en el himnario metodista Mil voces para celebrar (Abingdon Press: 1996), sin derechos de autor indicados en ese tomo.̆̆̆

English speakers should note that revised stanzas two and three make references to the feminine divine. These include "motherly redeemer" in stanza two (echoing Jesus' reference to God as a mother hen in Luke, and to Isaiah's image of God as a consoling mother), and "heavenly Sophia" in stanza three, meant to resonate with Proverbs' God of Wisdom.

ITALIAN HYMN (6.6.4.6.6.6.4.)

1. ¡Oh, san-to,~e-ter-no Dios!
Al-za-mos nues-tra voz
en gra-ti-tud
por lo que tú nos das
con sin i-gual ar-dor
han-llan-do nues-tra paz
en tu am-or.

2. ¡Ma-ter-no re-den-tor!
Te da-mos con a-mor
el co-ra-zón;
y tú nos pue-des ver
que~hu-mil-des a tu~al-tar,
ve-ni-mos a tra-er
pre-cio-so don.

3. ¡So-fí-a* ce-les-tial!
O-í-mos tu se-ñal
y tu bon-dad
de-rra-me~en nues-tro ser
di-vi-na cla-ri-dad,
pa-ra po-der vi-vir
en li-ber-tad.

* Es decir, Sabiduría.

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April 10, 2005

33R The Spacious Firmament On High

Original Title: "The Spacious Firmament On High," Joseph Addison (1712), CREATION, L.M.D., Franz Joseph Haydn (1798); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Paraphrase of Psalm 19:1-6. Addison was English and Anglican. The version of CREATION here is in a different key from the version in Hymns of the Spirit Two. The hymn appears in a version remarkably akin to this in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 283; it does not appear in The New Century Hymnal.

CREATION (L.M.D.)

1. The spa-cious fir-ma-ment on high,
with all the blue e-the-real sky,
and spang-led heavens, a shin-ing frame
their great O-rig-i-nal pro-claim.
Th’un-wea-ried sun, from day to day,
does its Cre-a-tor's power dis-play,
and pub-li-shes to eve-ry land
the work of an al-might-y hand.

2. Soon as the eve-ning shades pre-vail
the moon takes up the won-drous tale,
and night-ly to the liste-ning earth
re-peats the sto-ry of its birth;
While all the stars that round it burn
and all the pla-nets in their turn,
con-firm the ti-dings as they roll,
and spread the truth from pole to pole.

3. What though in sol-emn si-lence all
move round the dim ter-res-trial ball?
What though no re-al voice nor sound
a-mid the ra-diant orbs be found?
In rea-son's ear they all re-joice,
and ut-ter forth a glo-rious voice,
for-ev-er sing-ing as they shine,
"The hand that made us is di-vine."


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April 11, 2005

34R Heaven and Earth and Sea and Air

Original Title: "Heaven and Earth and Sea and Air," Joachim Neander (1680), trans. James Drummond Burns, POSEN, 7.7.7.7., Georg Christoph Strattner (1691); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), GOTT SEI DANK, 7.7.7.7., Johann A. Freylinghausen (1704). Psalm 57:7-11, 108:1-5; see also Psalm 19. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but it does appear in a version translated by Madeleine Forrell Marshall (1993) as no. 566, in five stanzas, also to the tune GOTT SEI DANK, in The New Century Hymnal. For Joachim Neander, see the entry under no. 7R.

GOTT SEI DANK (7.7.7.7.)

1. Heaven and earth, and sea and air,
all their mak-er’s praise de-clare;
Wake, my soul, a-wake and sing:
Now thy grate-ful prais-es bring.

2. See the glo-rious orb of day
break-ing through the clouds a-way;
Moon and stars with sil-very light
sing praise through the si-lent night.

3. O God's love hath eve-ry-where
made this earth so rich and fair;
hill and vale and fruit-ful land,
all life bears a ho-ly hand.

4. God, great won-ders work-est thou!
To thy sway all crea-tures bow;
Write thou deep-ly in my heart
what I am, and what thou art.


a. Him-mel, Er-de, Luft und Meer
zeu-gen von des Schöp-fers Ehr;
mei-ne See-le, sin-ge du,
bring auch jetzt dein Lob her-zu.


b. Seht das gro-ße Sonn-en-licht,
wie es durch die Wol-ken bricht;
auch der Mond, der Ster-ne Pracht
jauch-zen Gott bei still-er Nacht.

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April 14, 2005

37R Thou Rulest, God, the Lights On High

Original Title: "Thou Rulest, God, the Lights On High," Theodore Chickering Williams (1911), MELCOMBE, L.M., Samuel Webbe (1782); New Title: Same hymn tune, rev. REH (2006), ERHALT UNS, HERR, L.M., Geisliche Lieder (Wittenberg 1543). "[W]isdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, willing to yield, full of mercy." James 3:17. "Does not Wisdom call, and does not understanding raise her voice?" Proverbs 8:1; see also Proverbs 1:20-25. "O Lord, how manifold are your works! In wisdom you have made them all; the earth is full of your creatures," Psalm 104:24. Williams served as pastor of All Souls Church (Unitarian) in New York City for 13 years. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

ERHALT UNS, HERR (L.M.)

1. Thou rul-est, God, the lights on high;
Sun, moon and stars thy ser-vants be.
Yet eve-ry glo-ry of the sky
is bright-er still when I have thee.

2. How vast the mar-vel of the mind,
how far the beams of rea-son go!
Yet all wis-dom of hu-man-kind
burns deep-er still when thee I know.


3. Wher-e'er I look is light and joy:
A bloom-ing flower, an eag-le's wing;
their sin-less ju-bi-lee em-ploy,
and to thy praise full tri-bute bring.

4. Thy gifts to us be-yond com-pare,
like roy-al crowns and em-blems shine;
yet bring us nev-er to des-pair
when we hold these grand gifts as thine.


5. De-light and wis-dom, peace and power,
a heart of hope, se-rene and free,
through life's dim dream and tran-sient hour
I find, O God, tru-ly in thee.


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April 28, 2005

48R Spirit of God, Descend Upon My Heart

Original Title: "Spirit of God, Descend Upon My Heart," George Croly (1854), first tune, SONG 12, 10.10.10.10., rhythmed altered from Orlando Gibbons, second tune, MORECAMBE, 10.10.10.10., ascribed to Federick Cook Atkinson (1870); New Title: Same hymn title, no changes to lyrics, SONG 12, 10.10.10.10. Croly was a graduate of Dublin University; he later took holy orders. He left Ireland in 1810 for London. His works include Scenes from Scripture and Other Poems (1851) and Psalms and Hymns for Public Worship (1854). The original version consisted of five verses; the fourth verse was not included in Hymns of the Spirit Two. "Live by the spirit, I say ... If you are led by the spirit, you are not subject to the law," Galatians 5:16; see also 18-25. "Your memorable sayings are proverbs of ashes, your defenses are defenses of clay," Job 13:12. Matthew 3:16, "And Jesus, when he was baptized, went up straightway out of the water: and, lo, the heavens were opened unto him, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove, and lighting upon him," see also John 1:32; Matthew 22:37, Acts 8:17. Proverbs 1:28, "Then shall they call upon me, but I will not answer; they shall seek me early, but they shall not find me." The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but does appear, in revised form in five stanzas, to the tune MORECAMBE, as no. 290, in The New Century Hymnal.

SONG 22 (10.10.10.10.)

1. Spir-it of God, de-scend up-on my heart;
Wean it from earth; through all its puls-es move;
Stoop to my weak-ness, might-y as thou art;
And make me love thee as I ought to love.

2. I ask no dream, no pro-phet ec-sta-sies,
no sud-den rend-ing of the veil of clay,
no an-gel vi-si-tant, no open-ing skies;
But take the dim-ness of my soul a-way.

3. Teach me to feel that thou art al-ways nigh;
Teach me the strug-gles of the soul to bear.
To check the ris-ing doubt, the re-bel sigh,
teach me the pa-tience of un-an-swered prayer.

4. Teach me to love thee as thine an-gels love,
one ho-ly pas-sion fill-ing all my frame;
The kind-ling of the heaven-de-scend-ed dove,
My heart an al-tar, and thy love the flame. A-men.

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Shadows for dimness?

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May 10, 2005

55R Spirit of Life, Attend Our Prayer

Original Title: "Spirit Divine, Attend Our Prayer," Andrew Reed (1829), adapted by Samuel Longfellow, first tune, PRESERVATION, C.M., Johann Georg Christian Stoerl, second tune, ARLINGTON, C.M., Thomas Augustine Arne (1762); New Title: "Spirit of Life, Attend Our Prayer," rev. REH (2006), WINDSOR, C.M., Damon's Psalmes (1591). "Prophesy unto the Spirit, prophesy, son of man, and thou hast said unto the Spirit: Thus said the Lord Jehovah: From the four winds come in, O Spirit, and breathe on these slain, and they do live," Ezekiel 37:9 (YLT); see also Isaiah 34:16. Psalm 143:10, "Thy Spirit [is] good, Lead me into a land of uprightness," see also Psalm 51:11, Psalm 139:7, John 16:13. Acts 2:3 (KJV), "And there appeared unto them cloven tongues like as of fire, and it sat upon each of them," see also Isaiah 6:6-7, Hebrews 1:7, I Chronicles 21:26, Psalm 39:3. Romans 8:2 (KJV), "For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death." Proverbs 1:20-23 (NRSV), "Wisdom cries out in the street; in the squares she raises her voice . . .'I will pour out my thoughts to you,'" see also Proverbs 8:1, Proverbs 9:1,6, Proverbs 22:11-12. Ephesians 6:18 (KJV), "Praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit." Neither Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal includes the hymn.

WINDSOR (C.M.)

1. Spir-it of Life, at-tend our prayer,
and make our hearts your home;
de-scend with all your gra-cious power;
O come, great Spir-it, come!


2. Come as the light! to us re-veal
The truth we long to know;
And lead us in the path of life
Where all the vir-tuous go.

3. Come as the fire! and cleanse our hearts,
with sanc-ti-fy-ing flame,
till our whole souls de-vo-tion make
in love's re-deem-ing name.

4. Come as the dew, and sweet-ly bless
this con-sec-rat-ed hour;
till eve-ry bar-ren place shall own
with joy your quicken-ing power.


5. Come as the wind, O breath of God!
O Wis-dom-bear-ing grace!
Come, make your great sal-va-tion known,
wide as the hu-man race.

6. Spir-it Di-vine, at-tend our prayer;
Make a lost world thy home;
Des-cend with all thy gra-cious powers,
O come, great Spir-it, come.

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May 24, 2005

67R O Thou Whose Power Over Moving Worlds Presides

Original Title: "O Thou Whose Power Over Moving World Presides," Boethius (480-525), trans. Samuel Johnson (1750), OLD 124TH (10.10.10.10), Genevan Psalter (1551); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Boethius was a Roman statesman; his most famous work was The Consolations of Philosophy. He has been thought both a Christian and indeed a Christian martyr, yet his most famous work does not mention Christ or the Christian religion, and seems in the eyes of some to speak only the language of neo-Platonism (in a narrow sense, "a philosophical dialogue modelled on strictly pagan productions"). Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), also the name of the Unitarian hymnwriter from the 19th century (see no. 219R), here refers instead to the Englishman from a century before. Johnson was the subject of perhaps the earliest and best-known biography in English, written by John Boswell. A stanza of Boethius' original Latin has been added. "legem pone mihi Domine in via tua et dirige me in semita recta propter inimicos meos," Pslam 26:11 (Vulgate); "But as for me, I will go on in my upright ways: be my saviour, and have mercy on me," Psalm 26:11 (BBE); see also Proverbs 15:24, 12:28. "Dominus solus dux eius fuit et non erat cum eo deus alienus," Deuteronomy 32:12 (Vulgate); "So the Lord only was his guide, no other god was with him," Deuteronomy 32:12 (BBE); Exodus 13:21, 15:13, Acts 1:16. "[T]imor Domini principium," Proverbs 1:7a (Vulgate); "Start with God- the first step in learning is bowing down to God," Proverbs 1:7a (The Message); see also Proverbs 4:7, Proverbs 9:10. "[Christ] is a beginning, a first-born out of the dead," Colossians 1:18a (YLT); "[] qui est principium primogenitus ex mortuis," Colossians 1:18a (Vulgate). Romans 11:33 (KJV), "O the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! how unsearchable are his judgments, and his ways past finding out!" 1 Corinthians 2:7 (KJV), "But we speak the wisdom of God in a mystery, even the hidden wisdom, which God ordained before the world unto our glory," see also 1 Corinthians 1:24. Psalms 104:24 (KVJ), "O Lord, how manifold are thy works! in wisdom, hast thou made them all," see also Psalm 136:5, Proverbs 3:19. Jeremiah 10:12 (KJV), "He hath made the earth by his power, he hath established the world by his wisdom, and hath stretched out the heavens by his discretion." Genesis 1:14, "And God said, let there be lights," see also Genesis 7:24. The hymn is not included in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

OLD 124TH (10.10.10.10)

1. O Thou whose power o'er mov-ing worlds pre-sides,
whose voice cre-a-ted, and whose wis-dom guides,
On the dim earth in pure ef-ful-gence shine,
and cheer the cloud-ed mind with light di-vine,
and cheer the cloud-ed mind with light di-vine.

2. 'Tis thine a-lone to calm the re-verent breast,
with si-lent con-fi-dence and ho-ly rest;
from thee, great God! we spring, to thee we tend,
Path, Mo-tive, Guide, O-rig-i-nal, and End!
Path, Mo-tive, Guide, O-rig-i-nal, and End!

a. Tu nam-que se-re-num,
Tu re-qui-es tran-quil-la pi-is.
Te cer-ne-re fi-nis,
Prin-ci-pi-um, Vec-tor, Dux,
Se-mi-ta, Ter-mi-nus, I-dem.

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June 02, 2005

72R I Cannot Find Thee

Original Title: "I Cannot Find Thee," Eliza Scudder (1864), no changes here, LOMBARD STREET, 11.10.11.10., Frederick George Russell (1929). Scudder (1821-1896) was niece of hymnwriter Edmund Sears. Originally a Unitarian, she subsequently became an Episcopalian. The hymn is (unconscionably) not included in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. Psalm 14:1-2, "Fools say in their hearts, 'There is no God' . . . The Lord looks down from heaven on humankind to see if there are any who . . . seek after God." Mark 9:24, "Lord, I believe; help thou mine unbelief." "If I go forward, he is not there; or backward, I cannot perceive him; on the left he hides, and I cannot behold him; I turn to the right, but I cannot see him," Job 23:8-9 (NRSV). "Return, O my soul, to your rest, for the Lord has dealt bountifully with you," Psalm 116:7.

LOMBARD STREET (11.10.11.10.)

1. I can-not find thee. Still on rest-less pin-ion
my spir-it beats the void where thou dost dwell,
I wan-der lost through all thy vast do-min-ion,
and shrink be-neath thy light in-ef-fa-ble.

2. I can-not find thee. E'en when most a-dor-ing,
be-fore thy throne I bend in low-liest prayer;
Be-yond these bounds of thought my thought up-soar-ing
from far-thest quest comes back: thou art not there.


3. Yet high a-bove the lim-its of my see-ing,
and fold-ed far with-in the in-most heart,
and deep be-low the deeps of con-scious be-ing,
thy splen-dor shin-eth: there, O God, thou art.

4. I can-not lose thee. Still in thee a-bid-ing,
the end is clear, how wide so-e'er I roam;
The hand that holds the worlds my steps is guid-ing,
and I must rest at last in thee, my home.

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June 26, 2005

95R O God, the Watches of the Night (Are O'er)

Original Title: "Father, the Watches of the Night Are O'er," Words: from the Disciples' Hymn-Book (c. 1855), rev. REH (2005); Music: BATTLE (10.10.10.10.), Henry Lawes (1638); alternate, Music: SKARA (10.10.10.10), Frank Sewall (c. 1910). Psalm 63:6 (NRSV), "I think of you on my bed, and meditate on you in the watches of the night;" see also Psalm 74:16, Psalm 19:2, Psalm 55:17, Psalm 104:23. The hymn does not appear in either Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

BATTLE (10.10.10.10.)

1. O God, the watch-es of the night are o'er;
To light and life the soul has risen once more;
Praised be, So-phi-a, who through help-less hours,
does keep in deep-est peace her slum-bering powers.

2. Fath-er, the watch-es of the day are here;
More than from those of night have we to fear;
By rude cares troub-led, by temp-ta-tions pressed,
through the day watch-es, dear God, give us rest!

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January 01, 2006

282R O Free Church Beyond Fixed Creeds

Original Title: "Christian, Rise, and Act Thy Creed," Francis Albert Rollo Russell (1893), NUREMBERG, 7.7.7.7., adapted from Rudolph Ahle (1664); New Title: "O Free Church Beyond Fixed Creeds," rev. REH (2006), GOTT SEI DANK, 7.7.7.7., Johann A. Freylinghausen (1704). A fellow in the (British) Royal Meterological Society, Rollo's hymns appeared in the aptly named collection Break of Day. James 2:14-15 (NRSV), "What good is it, my brothers and sisters, if you say you have faith but . . . a brother or sister is naked and lacks daily food . . . and yet you do not supply their bodily needs, what is the good of that?" Rollo was, perhaps contrary to expectation, a Unitarian (a fact which the otherwise thorough custodians at cyberhymnal.com do not mention). Despite that, it does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but does appear in The New Century Hymnal, as no. 537, under the name "Christian, Rise, and Act Your Creed," to the tune INNOCENTS.

GOTT SEI DANK (7.7.7.7.)

1. O Free Church be-yond fixed creeds;
let your prayer be in your deeds;
seek the right, per-form the true,
raise your works and life a-new.

2. Hearts a-round you charged with care;
what can help their load to bear?
What can bring in-spir-ing power,
arm their fal-tering wills this hour?

3. Let your aims be hope and joy,
and your wor-ship God’s em-ploy,
rais-ing thanks in hum-ble zeal,
learn-ing ho-ly love to feel.

4. Come, O guide di-vine, and reign;
free-ing faith as-sailed in vain,
per-fect love be-reft of fear,
born in heaven and ra-diant here.

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July 27, 2006

614R Part in Peace

Original Title: "Part in Peace: Is Day Before Us?," Sarah F. Adams, in Hymns and Anthems, by William Johnson Fox (London: 1841), BEATRICE, 8.7.8.7., Wiliam C. Coe (1895); New Title: "Part in Peace (This Day Before Us)", rev. REH (2006), STUTTGART, 8.7.8.7., Christian Friedrich Witt in Psalmodia Sacra (Gotha 1715). "Depart in peace," James 2:16 (KJV). Adams was a English Unitarian, best known for the hymn "Nearer My God to Thee."

STUTTGART (8.7.8.7.)

1. Part in peace, this day be-fore us;
praise the Name, for life and light;
when the sha-dows leng-then o'er us,
bless the Love that guards the night.

2. Part in peace, with deep thanks-giv-ing,
ren-der, when we're home-ward bound,
gra-cious ser-vice in our liv-ing,
tran-quil beau-ty all a-round.

3. Part in peace, such are the prais-es
God our Ma-ker lov-eth best;
such the wor-ship that up-rais-es
hu-man hearts to heav-en-ly rest.

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