April 20, 2005

42R Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee

Original Title: "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee," Henry Van Dyke (1908), JOY, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., arranged from Ludwig van Beethoven; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Van Dyke was an American Presbyterian. The hymn tune is known as HYMN TO JOY in Singing the Living Tradition; no. 29 is a three-verse version of "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee;" no. 327 in the 1993 hymn is entitled "Joy, Thou Goddess," with original German lyrics for two stanzas of "Freude, schöner Götterfunken." The latter hymn, by Friedrich Schiller, constitutes the "original" lyrics insofar as they inspired Beethoven's composition. The New Century Hymnal has four verses (without sibling references) as no. 4, "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore You." See Psalm 145:10, "All your works shall give thanks to you," see also Psalm 71:23; Isaiah 49:13, "Sing for joy, O heavens, and exult, O earth; break forth, O mountains, into singing!"

JOY (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.)

1. Joy-ful, joy-ful, we a-dore thee, God of glo-ry, God of love;
Hearts un-fold like flowers be-fore thee, open-ing to the sun a-bove.
Melt the clouds of sin and sad-ness; drive the dark* of doubt a-way;
Giv-er of im-mort-al glad-ness, fill us with the light of day!


2. All thy works with joy sur-round thee, earth and heaven re-flect thy rays,
stars and an-gels sing a-round thee, cent-er of un-brok-en praise.
Field and for-est, vale and moun-tain, flow-ery mead-ow, flash-ing sea,
sing-ing bird and flow-ing foun-tain call us to re-joice in thee.

3. Thou art giv-ing and for-giv-ing, ev-er bless-ing, ev-er blessed;
Well-spring of the joy of liv-ing, o-cean depth of hap-py rest!
Lov-ing Sove-reign, Moth-er, Fath-er, all who live in love are thine;
teach us how to love each oth-er, lift us to the joy di-vine.

4. Mor-tals, join the hap-py chor-us, which the morn-ing stars beg-an;
Christ our Bro-ther reigns a-mongst us; Sis-ter Wis-dom seals the plan.
Ev-er sing-ing, march we on-ward, vic-tors in the midst of strife,
Joy-ful mus-ic leads us sun-ward in the tri-umph song of life.

*or 'storms'

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May 24, 2005

66R Day By Day the Manna Fell

Original Title: "Day By Day the Manna Fell," Josiah Conder (1836), rev. REH (2005), NUN KOMM, DER HEIDEN HEILAND, 7.7.7.7., Enchiridion Oder Handbuchlein (1524), Bach. Mark 6:41, 50, "Taking the five loaves and the two fish, he looked up to heaven, and blessed and broke the loaves, and gave them to his disciples to set before the people . . . Immediately he spoke to them and said, 'Take heart, it is I; do not be afraid;'" compare lyrics "cast foreboding fears away." See also John 6:11; John 6:48, 51 "I am the bread of life." Numbers 11:5-6, "We remember the fish we used to eat in Egypt for nothing, the cucumbers, the melons, the leeks, the onions, and the garlic; but now our strength is dried up, and there is nothing at all but this manna to look at;" compare Joshua 5:12. The New Century Hymnal and Singing the Living Tradition do not include the hymn.

NUN KOMM, DER HEIDEN HEILAND (7.7.7.7.)

1. Day by day the man-na fell;
O to learn this les-son well!
Still by cons-tant mer-cy fed,
Give me, God, my dai-ly bread.

2. "Day by day," the pro-mise reads,
dai-ly strength for dai-ly needs;
Cast fore-bod-ing fears a-way;
Take the man-na of to-day.

3. O my times are in thy hand;
All my san-guine hopes ex-pand.
On thy Wis-dom I re-cline,
and would make my pur-pose thine.

4. Thou my dai-ly task shalt give;
Day by day with thee I live;
So shall ad-ded years ful-fill,
still my own, and hea-ven’s will.

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June 01, 2005

71R "Where Is Your God?" They Say

Original Title: "'Where Is Your God?' They Say," James Martineau (1873), O GOTT, DU FROMMER GOTT, 6.7.6.7.6.6.6.6., Ahasuerus Fritsch, harm. J. S. Bach; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. James Martineau was an English Unitarian of Huguenot descent, too often underappreciated in North America. Psalm 14:1-2, "Fools say in their hearts, 'There is no God' . . . The Lord looks down from heaven on humankind to see if there are any who are wise, who seek after God." 1 Kings 19:12, "A still, small voice." "If I go forward, he is not there; or backward, I cannot perceive him; on the left he hides, and I cannot behold him; I turn to the right, but I cannot see him," Job 23:8-9. The hymn appears in neither Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

O GOTT, DU FROMMER GOTT (6.7.6.7.6.6.6.6.)

1. "Where is your God?" they say:
An-swer them, O Most Ho-ly!
Re-veal your se-cret way
of vi-sit-ing the low-ly:
Not wrapped in mov-ing cloud,
or night-ly rest-ing fire;
But veiled with-in the shroud
of si-lent high de-sire.

2. Come not in flash-ing storm,
or burst-ing frown of thun-der:
Come in the view-less form
of waken-ing love and won-der;
In du-ty grown di-vine
the rest-less spir-it still;
in sor-rows taught to shine
as shad-ows of your will.


3. O God, the pure a-lone,
e'en in their deep con-fess-ing,
can see you as their own
and find a per-fect bless-ing.
Yet to each wait-ing soul
speak in your still small voice,
till brok-en love's made whole,
and sad-dened hearts re-joice.

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June 02, 2005

72R I Cannot Find Thee

Original Title: "I Cannot Find Thee," Eliza Scudder (1864), no changes here, LOMBARD STREET, 11.10.11.10., Frederick George Russell (1929). Scudder (1821-1896) was niece of hymnwriter Edmund Sears. Originally a Unitarian, she subsequently became an Episcopalian. The hymn is (unconscionably) not included in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. Psalm 14:1-2, "Fools say in their hearts, 'There is no God' . . . The Lord looks down from heaven on humankind to see if there are any who . . . seek after God." Mark 9:24, "Lord, I believe; help thou mine unbelief." "If I go forward, he is not there; or backward, I cannot perceive him; on the left he hides, and I cannot behold him; I turn to the right, but I cannot see him," Job 23:8-9 (NRSV). "Return, O my soul, to your rest, for the Lord has dealt bountifully with you," Psalm 116:7.

LOMBARD STREET (11.10.11.10.)

1. I can-not find thee. Still on rest-less pin-ion
my spir-it beats the void where thou dost dwell,
I wan-der lost through all thy vast do-min-ion,
and shrink be-neath thy light in-ef-fa-ble.

2. I can-not find thee. E'en when most a-dor-ing,
be-fore thy throne I bend in low-liest prayer;
Be-yond these bounds of thought my thought up-soar-ing
from far-thest quest comes back: thou art not there.


3. Yet high a-bove the lim-its of my see-ing,
and fold-ed far with-in the in-most heart,
and deep be-low the deeps of con-scious be-ing,
thy splen-dor shin-eth: there, O God, thou art.

4. I can-not lose thee. Still in thee a-bid-ing,
the end is clear, how wide so-e'er I roam;
The hand that holds the worlds my steps is guid-ing,
and I must rest at last in thee, my home.

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December 03, 2005

205R Jesus, the Very Thought of You

Original Title: "Jesus, the Very Thought of Thee," Bernard of Clairvaux (12th Century), trans. Edward Caswall (1858), WINDSOR, C.M., Damon's Psalmes (1591); New Title: "Jesus, the Very Thought of You," rev. REH (2005), FIRST MODE MELODY, C.M.D., Thomas Tallis (1505-1585). Bernard in his time was seen as the embodiment of its ideal: that of medieval monasticism at its highest development; he is considered both a saint in the Roman and Anglican churches (he is the patron of bees, beekeepers, candles and wax). The original Latin title is "Jesu, Dulcis Memoria." Caswall was an English Anglican priest, who converted to Roman Catholicism. Neither the hymn nor the tune appears in Singing the Living Tradition, but the hymn does appear under the name "Jesus-The Very Thought to Me," to the tune ST. AGNES in The New Century Hymnal. The lyrics speak of of the Pauline epistles, who tell us to find the joy of God through Jesus. 1 Peter 1:8, Philemon 2:1-11, Romans 5:11, Philippians 2:9-11. Ephesians 3:19, "to know the love of Christ . . . that you may be filled with all the fullness of God," compare with the lyrics "Jesus ... with sweetness fills the breast."

FIRST MODE MELODY (C.M.D.)

1. Je-sus, the ve-ry thought of you
with sweet-ness fills the breast;
But sweet-er far your face to view,
and in your pre-sence rest.
Nor voice can sing, nor heart can frame,
nor can the mem-ory find
a sweet-er sound than your blest name,
bear-er of hu-man-kind!

2. When once you do vi-sit the heart,
then truth be-gins to shine,
then earth-ly van-i-ties de-part,
then kind-les love di-vine.
O Je-sus, light of all be-low,
and fount of liv-ing fire,
sur-pass-ing all the joys we know,
and all we can de-sire.

3. O Je-sus, you beau-ty im-part
of an-gel worlds a-bove;
Your name is mu-sic to the heart,
in-flam-ing it with love.
Je-sus, the ve-ry thought of you
with sweet-ness fills the breast;
But sweet-er far your face to view,
and in your pre-sence rest.

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December 15, 2005

228R When Winds Are Raging

Original Title: "When Winds Are Raging," Harriet Beecher Stowe (1855), ZU MEINEM HERRN, 11.10.11.10., adapted from Johann Gottfried Schicht; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), INTERCESSOR, 11.10.11.10.Charles H. H. Parry, Hymns Ancient and Modern, (1904). Harriet Beecher Stowe was a Congregationalist, and professor at Bowdoin College, Maine, in 1850. She wrote many books, including Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852), an anti-slavery novel. "There remains, then, a Sabbath rest for the people of God,” Hebrews 4:9; For [Christ] is our peace," Ephesians 2:14. "[Jesus] said to them, 'Come away to a deserted place all by yourselves and rest a while,'" Mark 6:31. "When [Jesus] saw that they were straining at the oars against an adverse wind, he came towards them early in the morning, walking on the sea . . . Then he got into the boat with them and the wind ceased," Mark 6:48, 50; see also John 6:18-20. "Remember, O Lord, how your servant is taunted; how I bear in my bosom the insults of the peoples, with which your enemies taunt, O Lord, with which they taunted the footsteps of your anointed," Psalm 89:50-51; compare the lyrics "the babble of life’s angry voices."

INTERCESSOR (11.10.11.10)

1. When winds are rag-ing o’er the up-per o-cean,
and bil-lows wild con-tend with an-gry roar,
’tis said, far down, be-low the wild com-mo-tion,
that peace-ful still-ness reign-eth ev-er-more.

2. Far, far be-neath, the noise of tem-pests dieth,
and sil-ver wa-ves chime ev-er peace-ful-ly,
and no rude storm, how fierce so e’er it fli-eth,
dis-turbs the sab-bath of that deep-er sea.

3. So to the heart that knows thy love, O Pur-est!
there is a tem-ple, sa-cred ev-er-more,
and all the bab-ble of life’s an-gry voi-ces
dies in hushed still-ness at its peace-ful door.

4. Far, far a-way, the roar of pas-sion di-eth,
and lov-ing thoughts rise calm and peace-ful-ly,
and no rude storm, how fierce so e’er it fli-eth,
dis-turbs the soul that dwells, Ho-ly, in thee.

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July 19, 2006

612R God of All Worlds

Original Title: "Lord of All Worlds," John Quincy Adams (1767-1848); New Title: "God of All Worlds," rev. REH (2006), DEUS TUORUM MILITUM, L.M.D., Grenoble Antiphoner (1753). Paraphrase of Psalm 14. Adams was the sixth President of the United States. A Unitarian, he wrote metrical versions of the psalms and several hymns. He is buried at the historic First Parish Church (Unitarian) in Quincy, Massachusetts.

DEUS TUORUM MILITUM (L.M.D.)

1. God of all worlds, let thanks and praise
to you for-ev-er fill my soul;
with bles-sings you have crowned my days,
my heart, my head, my hand con-trol.
O, let no vain pre-sump-tions rise,
no im-pious mur-mur in my heart,
to crave what-e'er your will de-nies,
or shrink from what your hands im-part.

2. Your child am I, and not an hour,
re-vol-ving in the orbs a-bove,
but brings some to-ken of your power,
but brings some to-ken of your love;
and shall this bo-som dare re-pine,
in night time dare de-ny the dawn,
or spurn the trea-sures of the mine,
be-cause one dia-mond is with-drawn?

3. Some souls do doubt, and not a-lone
your be-ing, God, and bound-less might,
but doubt the fir-ma-ment, your throne,
and doubt the sun’s me-ri-dian light;
and doubt the fa-shion of one's frame,
the voice one hears, the breath one draws;
O way-laid mor-tals, who pro-claim
ef-fects un-num-bered with-out cause!

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