March 08, 2005

8R Bring, O Morn, Your Music

Original Title: "Bring, O Morn, Thy Music," William Channing Gannett (1893), NICAEA, John Bacchus Dykes (1861); New Title: "Bring, O Morn, Your Music," rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. William Channing Gannett, born in Boston, served Unity Church (Unitarian) in St. Paul, and the Unitarian Church in Rochester, where Susan B. Anthony was amongst his congregants. The last line of each verse echoes Revelations 1:8 (which see), but the hymn as a whole personifies and praises nature, bordering on panentheism (although the lyrics textually have nature worshiping God as well, as "Our Creator" and "Mighty Giver"). See also Wisdom of Solomon 1:13-14, "God did not make death, and he does not delight in the death of the living. For he created all things that they might exist." Gannett wrote the hymn as a summary of the 1893 World Parliament of Religions in Chicago. It appears in Singing the Living Tradition as "Bring, O Morn, Thy Music, as no. 39, but does not appear in The New Century Hymnal. This version of NICAEA is in F-sharp, although NICAEA in Hymns of the Spirit Two is in E-flat. See No. 17R herein for a version of NICAEA in E-flat.

NICAEA (12.13.12.10.)

1. Bring, O Morn, your mus-ic! Night,~your star-lit si-lence!
O-ceans, laugh the rap-ture to the storm winds cours-ing free!
Suns and pla-nets cho-rus: you are our Cre-a-tor,
who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be!

2. Life and death, your crea-tures, praise~you, Migh-ty Gi-ver!
Praise and prayer are ris-ing in your beast and bird and tree:
Lo! they praise and van-ish, van-ish at your bidd-ing,
who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be!


3. Light us! lead us! love us! cry~your grop-ing na-tions,
speak-ing in a thou-sand tongues, your name a-lone the plea;
weav-ing free-ly out your ho-ly, hap-py pur-pose,
who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be!


4. Life nor death can part us, you~O Love E-ter-nal,
shep-herd of the wan-dering star and souls that way-ward flee!
Home-ward draws the spir-it to your spir-it yearn-ing,
who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be! A-men.

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8S Desde a aurora

Title: "Desde a aurora," William Channing Gannett (1893), Portuguese translation, Daniel Borges (2005), NICAEA, John Bacchus Dykes (1861). Daniel Borges, born in 1959, attends a Baptist church in São Paulo, Brazil. He has translated a number of English-language hymns into Portuguese, and appears to have composed new hymns as well. This is a translation of "Bring, O Morn, Thy Music," described in detail in the entry under 8R. It may be the only extant Portuguese-language translation (or adaptation) of a Unitarian or Universalist hymn.

NICAEA (12.13.12.10.)

1. Des-de a au-ro-ra à noi-te es-tre-la-da!
Jor-ra do rio a á-gua e ven-tos de a-mor!
Os pla-ne-tas can-tam Tuas ma-ra-vi-lhas,
Foi, É e sem-pre se-rá o Sal-va-dor!

2. A vi-da e a mor-te a Ti re-fle-tem!
Lou-vor e o-ra-ção pe-la Tua per-mis-são;
Tu-do o que e-xis-te foi por Ti cri-a-do
E a nós deu Sua e-ter-na Sal-va-ção!

3. An-da-mos no es-cu-ro, gui-e-nos oh! Je-sus,
Em to-da e qual-quer lín-gua te da-mos lou-vor,
Ce-ga-men-te e bem fe-liz se-gui-mos,
Foi, É e sem-pre se-rá o Cri-a-dor!

4. Es-tar se-pa-ra-dos! Nem pe-la mor-te,
Pa-ra to-das as al-mas er-ran-tes, és Pas-tor!
Com o Ce-les-tial Lar es-ta-mos a so-nhar,
Fui, sou e sem-pre se-rei so-nha-dor!

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March 09, 2005

9R Our God, Our God, Thou Shinest Here

Original Title: "Our God, Our God, Thou Shinest Here," Thomas Hornblower Gil (1846), CORONATION, 8.6.8.6.8.6., Oliver Holden (1793); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), MORNING SONG, 8.6.8.6.8.6., at­trib­ut­ed to Elkan­ah K. Dare (1782-1826), arranged by C. W. Douglas. Thomas Hornblower Gil was a lay English Unitarian hymn writer, who later joined the Congregational Church. He wrote nearly 200 hymns, and had definitive ideas about what a hymn should be: "Hymns are not meant to be theological statements, expositions of doctrine, or enunciations of precepts; they are utterances of the soul in its manifold moods of hope and fear, joy and sorrow, love, wonder, and aspiration. ... Hymns are meant and made to be sung. The best and most glorious hymns cannot be more exactly defined than as divine love songs." The lyrics here seem to speak of the Gospel of John: "The true light, which enlightens everyone, was coming into the world." John 1:9. "[John] came as a witness to testify to the light." John 1:7a. The hymn does not appear in either Singing the Living Tradition or in The New Century Hymnal.

MORNING SONG (8.6.8.6.8.6.)

1. Our God, our God, thou shin-est here,
thine own this lat-ter day.
To us thy ra-diant steps ap-pear,
here goes thy glo-rious way!
To us thy ra-diant steps ap-pear,
here goes thy glo-rious way!

2. We shine not on-ly with the light
thou shed-dest down of yore.
On us thou stream-est strong and bright,
thy com-ings are not o'er.
On us thou stream-est strong and bright,
thy com-ings are not o'er.

3. All op-en to our souls shall be
thy glo-ry's hi-ding-place.
Our mo-thers had not all of thee,
new births are in thy grace;
Our fa-thers had not all of thee,
new births are in thy grace.

4. Thou come-est here, thou stand-est by,
our work be-gins to shine.
Thou dwell-est with us migh-ti-ly,
on comes the years di-vine!
Thou dwell-est with us migh-ti-ly,
on comes the years di-vine!

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April 25, 2005

45R Morning, So Fair to See

Original Title: "Morning, So Fair to See," Vincent Brown Silliman (1934), ST. ELIZABETH, 6.6.9.6.6.8., Silesian Folksong; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. ST. ELIZABETH is also unhappily (albeit for fanciful reasons) known as CRUSADER'S HYMN. Silliman was a Unitarian and humanist, and one of the editors of the Hymns for the Celebration of Life, published in 1964, the first hymnal produced by the Unitarian Universalist Association after consolidation in 1961. As the giver of the "Berry Street Address" at UUA's 1977 General Assembly in Ithaca, Silliman said "hymn tinkering is a long-standing practice. Some tinkers have spread so widely that the original is all but forgotten." Another recast version of Silliman's hymn can be found in Singing the Living Tradition, at no. 42; it does not appear in The New Century Hymnal. Morning's beauty is a topic in Genesis; e.g., Genesis 1:5-31. Morning is a time when people went to the temple; e.g., Luke 21:38, John 8:2; morning also bespeaks glory; e.g., Song of Solomon 6:10 ("Who is she that looketh forth as the morning, fair as the moon, clear as the sun"); see also Isaiah 58:8.

ST. ELIZABETH (6.6.9.6.6.8.)

1. Morn-ing, so fair to see,*
Night, veiled in mys-ter-y,
Glo-rious the earth and res-plen-dent skies!
Pil-grims, we march a-long,
Sing-ing our Pil-grim song,
As through an earth-ly par-a-dise.

2. Green are the grow-ing trees;
Blue are the flash-ing seas;
Glo-rious each won-der the sea-sons bring.
Bright-er is faith's sur-mise
shin-ing in Pil-grims' eyes:
Bright-er the com-mon-weal we sing.

3. Age af-ter age we rise,
'Neath the e-ter-nal skies,
In-to the light from the sha-dowed past:
Still shall our Pil-grim song,
Bou-yant and brave and strong,
Re-sound while life and moun-tains last.

*Or 'shines so brightly.' A version of the hymn less reticient about the word "fair," and thus much closer to the original text, might read as follows:

1. Morn-ing, so fair to see,
Night, veiled in mys-ter-y,
Glo-rious the earth and res-plen-dent skies!
Pil-grims, we march a-long,
Sing-ing our Pil-grim song,
As through an earth-ly par-a-dise.

2. Fair are the verdant trees;
fair are the flash-ing seas;
Fair is each won-der the sea-sons bring.
Fair-er is faith's sur-mise
shin-ing in Pil-grims' eyes:
Fair-er the com-mon-weal we sing.

3. Age af-ter age we rise,
'Neath the e-ter-nal skies,
In-to the light from the sha-dowed past:
Still shall our Pil-grim song,
Bou-yant and brave and strong,
Re-sound while life and moun-tains last.

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June 19, 2005

88R Come, My Soul, the Hour Is Waking

HAYDN (LUX PRIMA)(8.4.7.8.4.7.)

1. Come, my soul, the hour is wak-ing;
Now is break-ing o'er the earth a-no-ther day;
Come to One that made this splen-dor;
May I ren-der all my morn-ing strength can pay.

2. I, too, hail the Sun re-turn-ing,
rea-dy burn-ing the in-cense of my soul's powers,
for the night is safe-ly end-ed,
God has tend-ed the soul with care through help~less hours.

3. Pray that Love may pros-per ev-er
each en-dea-vor when our aim is good and true;
And that Wis-dom ev-er thwart us,
and re-store us, when the soul would ev-il~pur-sue.

4. May my soul on life’s last mor-row,
free from sor-row, slip a-way in slum-ber sweet:
And, re-leased from death’s last sad-ness,
rise in glad-ness that far bright-er Sun to greet.

5. On-ly God’s free gifts a-buse not,
light re-fuse not, but the Spir-it’s voice o-bey;
May my soul with Love ere be-hold
and light en-fold all things al-ways in un~cloud~ed day.

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June 20, 2005

89R O God of Morning (and of Night)

Original Title: "Lord God of Morning and of Night," Francis Turner Palgrave (1860), MORNING HYMN, L.M., François Hippolyte Barthélémon (1785); New Title: "O God of Morning (and of Night)," rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Palgrave was an English Anglican. Psalm 130:6, "My soul waits for the Lord more than those who watch for the morning."

MORNING HYMN (L.M.)

1. O God of morn-ing and of night,
we thank thee for thy gifts of light;
as in the dawn the sha-dows fly,
we seem to find thee now more nigh.


2. Fresh hopes have wak-ened in the heart,
fresh force to do our dai-ly part;
thy slum-ber gifts our strength re-store,
through-out the day to serve thee more.

3. Yet while thy will we would pur-sue,
oft what we would we can-not do;
the Sun may stand in ze-nith skies,
but on the soul thick mid-night lies.


4. O Light of lights, 'tis thou a-lone
canst make our sha-dowed hearts thine own;
though this new day with joy we see,
Great Dawn of God, we cry for thee.

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June 21, 2005

90R The Morning Hangs a Signal

Original Title: "The Morning Hangs a Signal," William Channing Gannett, MEIRIONYDD, 7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6., William Lloyd (1840); New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2007), same hymn tune. William Channing Gannett (1840-1923) was an American Unitarian minister, particularly active within the Western Unitarian Conference. He was author of a document of great historical importance to the WUC entitled "Things Commonly Believed Among Us". He played a particularly important role in the women's suffrage movement in the United States; Susan B. Anthony was amongst his congregants while a pastor in Rochester, New York. "I appointed you a prophet to the nations . . . Now I have put my words in your mouth," Jeremiah 1:5, 9 (NRSV). "No prophet is accepted in the prophet’s hometown," Luke 4:24. "The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear?," Psalm 27:1 (KJV). "But for you who revere my name the sun of righteousness shall rise, with healing in its wings," Malachi 4:2 (NRSV); see also Psalm 19:5-6, 84:11, Matthew 13:43, Isaiah 58:8. "I am the root and the offspring of David, and the bright and morning star, Revelation 22:16 (KJV), see also Joel 2:2. "Is not my word like fire," Jeremiah 23:29 (NRSV); see also Jeremiah 5:14. The hymn does not appear in The New Century Hymnal, but it does appear in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 40, slightly modified from how it appears in Hymns of the Spirit Two, and in a form with minor differences from below.

MEIRIONYDD (7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6.)

1. The morn-ing hangs a sig-nal
up-on the moun-tain crest,
while all the sleep-ing val-leys
in sil-ent dark-ness rest;
From peak to peak it flash-es,
it laughs a-long the sky,
til glo-ry of the sun-light
on all the land doth lie.

2. A-bove the gen-er-a-tions,
the lone-ly proph-ets rise,
while truth flings dawn and day-star
with-in their glow-ing eyes;
And oth-er eyes, be-hold-ing,
are kind-led from that flame,
and dawn be-com-eth morn-ing,
as proph-ehts Love pro-claim.

3. The soul hath lift-ed mo-ments,
a-bove the drift of days,
when life's great mean-ing break-eth
in sun-rise on our ways;
Be-hold the ra-diant to-ken
of faith a-bove all fear;
Night soon shall end its splen-dor
that morn-ing shall ap-pear.

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June 26, 2005

95R O God, the Watches of the Night (Are O'er)

Original Title: "Father, the Watches of the Night Are O'er," Words: from the Disciples' Hymn-Book (c. 1855), rev. REH (2005); Music: BATTLE (10.10.10.10.), Henry Lawes (1638); alternate, Music: SKARA (10.10.10.10), Frank Sewall (c. 1910). Psalm 63:6 (NRSV), "I think of you on my bed, and meditate on you in the watches of the night;" see also Psalm 74:16, Psalm 19:2, Psalm 55:17, Psalm 104:23. The hymn does not appear in either Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

BATTLE (10.10.10.10.)

1. O God, the watch-es of the night are o'er;
To light and life the soul has risen once more;
Praised be, So-phi-a, who through help-less hours,
does keep in deep-est peace her slum-bering powers.

2. Fath-er, the watch-es of the day are here;
More than from those of night have we to fear;
By rude cares troub-led, by temp-ta-tions pressed,
through the day watch-es, dear God, give us rest!

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July 03, 2005

103R Awake Our Souls! Away Our Fears!

Orginal Title: "Awake Our Souls! Away Our Fears!" Issac Watts (1707), TRURO (L.M.), Psalmodia Evangelica (1789); No changes here. It does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal. 2 Corinthians 5:17b (NRSV), "[E]verything old has passed away; see, everything has become new!"

TRURO (L.M.)

1. A-wake, our souls! a-way, our fears!
Let eve-ry trem-bling thought be gone!
A-wake, and run the heaven-ly race,
and put a cheer-ful cour-age on.

2. True, ’tis a strait and thorn-y road,
and mor-tal spir-its tire and faint;
But they for-get the migh-ty God,
that feeds the strength of eve-ry saint.


3. O migh-ty God, thy match-less power
is ev-er new, and ev-er young;
And firm en-dures, while end-less years
their ev-er-last-ing cir-cles run.

4. From thee, the ev-er flow-ing spring,
Our souls shall drink a fresh sup-ply;
While such as trust their na-tive strength
shall melt a-way, and droop, and die.

5. Swift as the ea-gle cuts the air,
we’ll mount a-loft to thine a-bode;
On wings of love our souls shall fly,
nor tire a-long the heaven-ly road.


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July 09, 2005

109R Has Not Your Heart Within You Burned

REX GLORIOSE (L.M.)

1. Has not your heart with-in you burned
at even-ing's* calm and ho-ly hour,
as if its in-most depths dis-cerned
the pre-sence of a lof-tier power?

2. Have not you heard mid for-est glades
while an-cient ri-vers mur-mured by,
a voice from the e-ter-nal shades
that spoke a truth from heaven on high?


3. Was it the voice of God speak-ing
in si-lence to your si-lent heart,
per-chance each worth-ier thought bid-ding,
that eve-ry dream of earth de-part?

4. O voice of God, for-ev-er near,
in low, sweet ac-cents whis-pering peace,
make us your har-mo-nies to hear
whose heaven-ly e-choes nev-er cease.

* or 'the dawn's'

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