January 05, 2006

546R Faith of the Martyrs, Living Still

Original Title: "Faith of Our Fathers, Living Still," adapted from Frederick William Faber (1849), ST. CATHERINE, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Henri Frederick Hemi (1865); New Title: "Faith of the Martyrs," rev. REH (2006), same hyme tune. Though the son of an Anglican cleric, Faber was a Roman Catholic priest. The hymn speaks of the persecution of Catholics in Britain; the original spoke of "Mary's prayers" that would set Britain free. Its position in Hymns of the Spirit Two (1937) is of note; as no. 546, it is the first hymn in the section marked "SUPPLEMENT." Many of these hymns were reckoned to be tunes of lesser quality, popular with the more rural Universalists. Oddly, however, "Faith of Our Fathers" does not appear in the prior hymnal published by the Universalists, Hymns of the Church (Boston: 1917) (though Reginald Heber's "Forth From the Dark and Stormy Sky" appears therein to ST. CATHERINE, a tune which does not appear anywhere other than at no. 546 in Hymns of the Spirit Two). It may be that its Catholic pedigree (Universalists were generally less anti-Catholic than Unitarians and other Protestants of the day) and the theme of persecution made the hymn appropriate for the "Universalist" section. In New England, the Unitarians were originally part of the "Standing Order" of (state-supported) Puritan/Congregational churches until in some cases the middle part of the 19th century; such standing did not apply to the (relatively speaking, persecuted) Universalists. The lyrics echo Hebrews 11:1-2 (NRSV), "Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen. Indeed, by faith our ancestors received approval." They also obliquely refer to the story in Mark regarding John the Baptist, "she rushed back to the king and requested, 'I want you to give me at once the head of John the Baptist on a platter,' . . . Immediately the king sent a soldier of the guard with orders to bring John's head. He went and beheaded him in the prison, brought his head on a platter," Mark 6:25-28. One too is reminded of Job in the Hebrew Bible, "But [God] knows the way that I take; when he has tested me, I shall come out like gold," Job 23:10. "Then the Lord answered Job out of the whirlwind: . . . Gird up your loins . . . I will question you, and you shall declare to me," Job 38:1-3. "Then Job answered the Lord: 'I know that you can do all things, and that no purpose of yours can be thwarted,'" Job 42:1-2. The hymn's lyrical change to "Faith of Our Mothers" is more than fanciful political correction; while the Congregational Church claims the first woman ordained to Christain ministry in the United States, the Universalists claim the first woman approved to the ministry at the denominational level, in the person of Olympia Brown. In the Midwest, female preaching "circuit riders" (including the celebrated Iowa Sisterhood) famously spread the liberating gospel of the faith. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but does appear as "Faith of the Martyrs, Living Still," as no. 381, in The New Century Hymnal.

ST. CATHERINE (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. Faith of the mar-tyrs, liv-ing still,
in spite of dun-geon, fire and sword;
O how our hearts beat high with joy
when-e'er we hear that glo-rious word!
Faith of the mar-tyrs, ho-ly faith!
We will be true through life and death.

2. Faith of our fa-thers, we will strive
to dwell with all souls peace-ful-ly;
and through the truth that comes from God,
we all shall then be tru-ly free.
Faith of our fa-thers, ho-ly faith!
We will be true through life and death.

3. Our for-bears chained in pri-son dim
were still in heart and con-science free;
and blessed would be our own lives' fate
if we, like them, should live for thee.
Faith of our for-bears, ho-ly faith!
We will be true through life and death.

4. Faith of our mo-thers, we will love
both friend and foe in all our strife;
and preach thee, too, as love knows how
by kind-ly words and vir-tuous life.
Faith of our mo-thers, ho-ly faith!
We will be true through life and death.

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January 07, 2006

556R There's a Wideness in God's Mercy

Original Title: "Souls of Men! Why Will Ye Scatter," Frederick William Faber (1854), WESTON, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., John E. Roe; New Title: "There's a Wideness in God's Mercy," rev. REH (2007), ST. MABYN, 8.7.8.7. D, Arthur Henry Brown (1889). "Or those eighteen who were killed when the tower of Siloam fell on them—do you think that they were worse offenders than all the others living in Jerusalem? No, I tell you," Luke 13:4-5a (NRSV). "His mercy is for those who fear him from generation to generation,” Luke 1:50. Zechariah 13:17 (ESV), "Strike the shepherd, and the sheep will be scattered." Isaiah 60:20 (KJV), "Thy sun shall no more go down; neither shall thy moon withdraw itself: for the LORD shall be thine everlasting light, and the days of thy mourning shall be ended." Luke 15:4-5, "What man of you, having an hundred sheep, if he lose one of them, doth not leave the ninety and nine in the wilderness, and go after that which is lost, until he find it? And when he hath found it, he layeth it on his shoulders, rejoicing." Psalm 119:96 (ESV), "I have seen a limit to all perfection, but your commandment is exceedingly broad." 1John 5:3 (NRSV), "For the love of God is this, that we obey his commandments. And his commandments are not burdensome;" see also Romans 7:12. The hymn appears as no. 213 with three stanzas (from stanza one below, and the first half of stanza three) to the tune CHARLESTON, 8.7.8.7., in Singing the Living Tradition. It also appears as no. 23 in The New Century Hymnal to the tune IN BABILONE, 8.7.8.7.D, with two stanzas, with HOLY MANNA as an alternate.

ST. MABYN (8.7.8.7. D)

1. There's a wide-ness in God's mer-cy,
like the wide-ness of the sea;
there's a kind-ness in true jus-tice,
which is more than lib-er-ty.
For the love di-vine is broad-er
than the mea-sure of our mind;
and the heart of the E-ter-nal
is most won-der-ful-ly kind.

2. Souls on earth, why do you scat-ter
like a crowd of count-ing sheep?
Lone-some hearts, why do you wan-der
from a love so true and deep?
Do you know a kind-er shep-herd
half as gen-tle, half as sweet,
as the Sove-reign who would have us
turn to heav-en's mer-cy seat?

3. O we make love's law too nar-row
by false li-mits of our own;
and we mag-ni-fy God's strict-ness
with a zeal not heav-en's own.
If our lives were but more sim-ple,
we should live them in God's love;
then our lives would all be sun-shine
with a sweet-ness from a-bove.

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