March 17, 2005

17R Holy, Holy, Holy

Original Title: "Holy, Holy, Holy, (Lord God Almighty)," Reginald Heber (arr.)(1826), NICAEA, 11.12.12.10, John Bacchus Dykes (1861); New Title: "Holy, Holy, Holy," arr., same hymn tune. Heber was an Anglican bishop, and the hymn tune name, NICAEA, gives a clue as to the trinitarian impulses of his original words. Unitarians have rearranged his words, omitting references to the Trinity, since at least 1848. Even the 1917 Universalist hymnal, Hymns of the Church, includes, as does Hymns of the Spirit Two, only three verses of Heber's original, with no trinitarian references. Singing the Living Tradition recasts the same three verses as no. 26, "Holy, Holy, Holy, (Author of Creation)," while The New Century Hymnal in four verses gives us "Holy, Holy, Holy, (God the Almighty). The verse regarding "cherubim and seraphim," excised from Unitarian and Universalist hymnody for centuries now, has been restored here. "Holy, holy, holy," are words addressed above in Isaiah 6:3, Revelation 4:8, and in communion prayers in many settings.

NICAEA (11.12.12.10)

1. Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly! O God Al-migh-ty!
Ear-ly in the morn-ing our song shall rise to thee;
Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly, mer-ci-ful and migh-ty!
Per-fect in power, in love, and pu-ri-ty.

2. Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly! All the saints a-dore thee,
Cast-ing down their gol-den crowns a-round the glass-y sea;
Che-rub-im and se~raph-im fall-ing down be-fore thee,
Who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be.

3. Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly! though the night-fall hide thee,
hin-dered by our va-ni-ties we have not eyes to see;
On-ly thou art ho-ly; there is none be-side thee,
Per-fect in power, in love, and pu-ri-ty!

4. Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly! O God Al-migh-ty!
All thy works shall praise thy name, in earth, and sky, and sea;
Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly; mer-ci-ful and migh-ty!
Who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be.

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17S ¡Santa, santa, santa!

Título original: "¡Santo, santo, santo!," Reginald Heber (1826), trad. Juan B. Cabrera, NICAEA, 13.12.13.12., John B. Dykes (1861); Título nuevo: "¡Santa, santa, santa!," rev. REH (2006), la misma tonada. No. 24 en El Himnario; no. 4 en Mil voces para celebrar. NICAEA here is in F-sharp, as it is in El Himnario, not E-flat, as it is in Hymns of the Spirit Two.

NICAEA (13.12.13.12.)

1. ¡San-ta, san-ta, san-ta! Fuer-za re-den-to-ra,
siem-pre~el la-bio mí-o lo-or-es te da-rá,
¡San-ta, san-ta, san-ta! Tú, Sa-bi-du-rí-a,
an-te ti que~has si-do, que er-es y se-rás.


2. ¡San-ta, san-ta, san-ta! Aun-que~es-tés ve-la-da
e~im-po-si-ble se-a tu glo-ria~a con-tem-plar,
san-ta tú~er-es só-lo, san-ta~y ex-al-ta-da,
en po-der per-fec-to, pu-re-za~y ca-ri-dad.

3. ¡San-ta, san-ta, san-ta! La gran mu-che-dum-bre
de~án-ge-les que cum-plen la san-ta vo-lun-tad.
¡San-ta, san-ta, san-ta! El mun-do te~a-do-re,
Tú de mu-chos nom-bres, ben-di-ta U-ni-dad.

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March 21, 2005

21R Great God, the Followers of Your Child

Original Title: "Great God, the Followers of Thy Son," Henry Ware, Jr. (1819), HEBRON, L.M., Lowell Mason (1830); New Title: "Great God, the Followers of Your Child," rev. REH (2006), SEWALL, L.M., Frank Sew­all, The Magnificat (New York 1910). Henry Ware, Jr., was a Unitarian minister, and pastor of Second Church in Boston; Sewall was pastor of the Swedenborgian National Church in Washington, D.C. "God's feet," Exodus 24:10; "The truth will set you free," John 8:32. John 3:21, "[W]ho lives by the truth will come to the light." Mark 10:52 (NRSV), "Jesus said to him,, 'Go; your faith has made you well.' Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way." "When they had brought their boats to shore, they left everything and followed him," Luke 5:11 (NRSV). The hymn appears neither in The New Century Hymnal nor in Singing the Living Tradition.

SEWALL (L.M.)

1. Great God, the fol-lowers of your child,
we bow be-fore your ho-ly seat,
to wor-ship you, O Mer-cy Mild,
and pour our wish-es at your feet.


2. O grant your bless-ings here to-day!
O give your peo-ple joy and peace!
The to-kens of your love dis-play,
and fa-vor that shall ne-ver cease.


3. We seek the truth that Je-sus brought;
the path of light we long to tread;
here are the ho-ly teach-ings taught;
and their pur-est in-flu-ence shed.

4. May faith and hope and love a-bound;
ev-ils and er-rors be for-given;
and all on your great day be found
child-ren of God and heirs of heaven!

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4. ...

May faith and hope and love abound;
Our sins and errors be forgiven;

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April 19, 2005

41R O God, Your Wonders

Original Title: "Father, Thy Wonders Do Not Singly Stand," Jones Very (1839, 1846), OLD FIRST, 10.10.10.10., later form of melody in Genevan Psalter (1542); New Title: "O God, Your Wonders (Do Not Singly Stand)," rev. REH (2007), TOULON, 10.10.10.10., abridged from Genevan Psalter (1551). The hymn is based on two poems, both called "The Spirit-Land," one written in 1839 and which begins "Father, thy wonders do not singly stand; the second, written in 1846 of the same title, begins "Open our eyes . . ." Very was a Unitarian minister, and Transcendentalist poet, contemporary of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, who is said to have "gone mad" at an early age. "Spirit land" seems to be an invocation (albeit infrequent) of heaven even in conventional Christian hymns. For example, Samuel Greg's 1854 hymn, "Stay, Master, Upon This Heavenly Hill," entreats Jesus to "let us linger a little longer . . . and catch a glimpse into spirit land." Very seems, by contrast, to place this spirit land not somewhere distant or obscure, but rather somewhere "richly . . . displayed," in an "enchanted land" that lies ever around us. God gave us inspiration and intuition; Very seems to tell us we should not waste these precious gifts that are "at hand;" that is, available to us. Such is the language Jesus used too in speaking of the Kingdom of God, in images so often misunderstood by his followers. Matthew 3:2; 4:17; Mark 1:15. "Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?,” Mark 10:17. "When they had brought their boats to shore, they left everything and followed him," Luke 5:11 (NRSV). The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition or in The New Century Hymnal.

TOULON (10.10.10.10.)

1. O God! your won-ders do not sing-ly stand,
nor far re-moved where feet have sel-dom strayed;
A-round us ev-er lies th'en-chant-ed land;
Rich mar-vels to your child-ren thus dis-played.

2. In find-ing you are all things round us found;
In los-ing you are all things lost be-side;
Ears have we but in vain strange voic-es sound,
and to our eyes the vi-sion is de-nied.


3. O-pen our eyes that we that world may see,
o-pen our ears that we your voice may hear,
and in the spir-it-land may ev-er be,
and feel your pre-sence with us al-ways near.

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May 10, 2005

55R Spirit of Life, Attend Our Prayer

Original Title: "Spirit Divine, Attend Our Prayer," Andrew Reed (1829), adapted by Samuel Longfellow, first tune, PRESERVATION, C.M., Johann Georg Christian Stoerl, second tune, ARLINGTON, C.M., Thomas Augustine Arne (1762); New Title: "Spirit of Life, Attend Our Prayer," rev. REH (2006), WINDSOR, C.M., Damon's Psalmes (1591). "Prophesy unto the Spirit, prophesy, son of man, and thou hast said unto the Spirit: Thus said the Lord Jehovah: From the four winds come in, O Spirit, and breathe on these slain, and they do live," Ezekiel 37:9 (YLT); see also Isaiah 34:16. Psalm 143:10, "Thy Spirit [is] good, Lead me into a land of uprightness," see also Psalm 51:11, Psalm 139:7, John 16:13. Acts 2:3 (KJV), "And there appeared unto them cloven tongues like as of fire, and it sat upon each of them," see also Isaiah 6:6-7, Hebrews 1:7, I Chronicles 21:26, Psalm 39:3. Romans 8:2 (KJV), "For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death." Proverbs 1:20-23 (NRSV), "Wisdom cries out in the street; in the squares she raises her voice . . .'I will pour out my thoughts to you,'" see also Proverbs 8:1, Proverbs 9:1,6, Proverbs 22:11-12. Ephesians 6:18 (KJV), "Praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit." Neither Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal includes the hymn.

WINDSOR (C.M.)

1. Spir-it of Life, at-tend our prayer,
and make our hearts your home;
de-scend with all your gra-cious power;
O come, great Spir-it, come!


2. Come as the light! to us re-veal
The truth we long to know;
And lead us in the path of life
Where all the vir-tuous go.

3. Come as the fire! and cleanse our hearts,
with sanc-ti-fy-ing flame,
till our whole souls de-vo-tion make
in love's re-deem-ing name.

4. Come as the dew, and sweet-ly bless
this con-sec-rat-ed hour;
till eve-ry bar-ren place shall own
with joy your quicken-ing power.


5. Come as the wind, O breath of God!
O Wis-dom-bear-ing grace!
Come, make your great sal-va-tion known,
wide as the hu-man race.

6. Spir-it Di-vine, at-tend our prayer;
Make a lost world thy home;
Des-cend with all thy gra-cious powers,
O come, great Spir-it, come.

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May 15, 2005

58R O Not In Far-Off Realms of Space

Original Title: "Go Not, My Soul, In Search of Him," Frederick Lucian Hosmer (1879), first tune, OLD 137TH, C.M.D., One and fiftie Psalms of David (1556), second tune, STRACATHRO, C.M, Charles Hutcheson (1832); New Title: "O Not In Far-Off Realms of Space," Frederick Lucian Hosmer (1879), alt. REH (2006), OLD 137TH, C.M.D. Hosmer, born 1840, was an American Unitarian minister, and graduate of Harvard Divinity School. Hosmer's "Go Not My Soul in Search of Him," as it is called in Hymns of the Spirit Two, does not seem to be casually matched with OLD 137TH, but instead seems to take Psalm 137 as a point of radical departure. While the psalm asks how the songs of Zion might be sung in the land of Babylon, in the land of the tormentors, Hosmer to the contrary responds "Soul with soul hath kin." While the original psalm speaks of the throne of Jerusalem as the only throne, Hosmer in dialogue seems again to suggest the contrary, instructing us that the throne of God is not anywhere else but in each soul. When the psalmist tell us that if Zion fades, the psalmist's own strength will fade, Hosmer teaches that the "inward sign" will herald the entire earth shining with "Deity." Rather than looking to Jerusalem, he would have us "repair" to the Jerusalem of the soul. See also Psalm 42:2 (NRSV) "My soul thirsts for God, for the living God. When shall I come and behold the face of God?" and ""Be still, and know that I am God!," Psalm 46:10. 'Thou hast visited the earth, thou hast watered it; thou greatly enrichest it," Psalm 65:9 (Darby). "All the earth is full of his glory," Isaiah 6:3 (KJV). "But whenever you pray, go into your room and shut the door and pray to your Father who is in secret," Matthew 6:6 (NRSV). Isaiah 40:22 (KJV), "It is he that sitteth upon the circle of the earth, and the inhabitants thereof are as grasshoppers; that stretcheth out the heavens as a curtain, and spreadeth them out as a tent to dwell in." Isaiah 54:2, "Enlarge the place of thy tent, and let them stretch forth the curtains of thine habitations: spare not, lengthen thy cords, and strengthen thy stakes." The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition or in The New Century Hymnal.

OLD 137TH (C.M.D.)

1. O not in far-off realms of space
the Spir-it has a throne;
But in each heart finds a true place,
yet wait-ing to be known.
Search not, my soul, a-far in vain:
you will not find God there;
Nor in the depths of sha-dows wane,
nor in the heights of air.

2. Thought ans-wer-ing a-lone to thought,
as Soul with soul has kin;
The out-ward God one rec-kons not
who finds not God with-in.
And if the vi-sion comes rich-ly
re-vealed by in-ward sign,
Earth will be full of De-i-ty
and with full glo-ry shine!

3. You shall not want for com-pa-ny,
nor pitch a tent a-lone;
Th'in-dwell-ing God will go free-ly,
and show you of Life's own.
Search not for God a-far in space,
but to your-self re-pair;
Wait then with-in that si-lent grace,
and you shall find Love there!

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December 06, 2005

208R O Jesus, Let Me Walk With You

Original Title: "O Master, Let Me Walk With Thee," Washington Gladden (1879), First Tune in Hymns of the Spirit Two, PLAISTOW, L.M., from Magdalen Hymns (c. 1760), Second Tune in Hymns of the Spirit Two, MARYTON, L.M., Henry Percey Smith (1874); New Title: "O Jesus, Let Me Walk With You," alt. 2008, MARYTON, L.M. Neither the hymn nor the tunes appear in Singing the Leaving Tradition, but the hymn, under the name "O Savior, Let Me Walk With You," to the tune MARYTON, is included in the United Church of Christ's New Century Hymnal as no. 503. Gladden was a Congregationalist minister, well known for his writings and lectures on social concerns during the 19th Century. The metaphor of walking or otherwise following occurs in the Christian Scriptures, in John 1:43, "Follow me," in Ephesians 4:1, where we are told to "lead a life worthy" to that we have been called, and in 1 John 2:6, in the line immediately after the lectionary reading for Easter 2B, in which we are told we "ought to walk as [Christ] walked;" see also Luke 5:11. In the Hebrew Bible, famously, Micah 6:8 tells us what is required is that we "walk humbly" with our God. See also Mark 10:51-52 (NRSV), "Then Jesus said to him, 'What do you want me to do for you?' The blind man said to him, 'My teacher, let me see again.' Jesus said to him, 'Go; your faith has made you well.' Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way."


MARYTON (L.M.)

1. O Je-sus, let me walk with you,
In sim-ple paths of ser-vice true;
Tell me your se-cret; help me bear
The strain of toil, the fret of care.


2. Help me the slow of heart to move
By some clear, win-ning word of love;
Show me the way-ward feet to stay,
And guide them in the home-ward way.


3. Show me your pa-tience; with me be
In clo-ser, dear-er, com-pa-ny,
In work that keeps faith sweet and strong,
In trust that tri-umphs ov-er wrong.

4. In hope that sends a shin-ing ray
Far down the fu-ture’s broad-ening way,
In peace that tru-ly you can give,
With you, O Je-sus, let me live.

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December 10, 2005

212R Christ Calls 'Take Up the Cross'

Original Title: "Thou Say'st, 'Take Up Thy Cross,'" Francis Turner Palgrave (1865), ST. THOMAS, S.M., Aaron Williams (1763); New Title: "Christ Call 'Take Up the Cross,'", rev. REH (2005), OLD 134TH (S.M.), Genevan Psalter (1543), arr. William Crotch (1836). The tune is also known as ST. MICHAEL and CALVIN. The text resonantes with Matthew 4:19(b): "Jesus ... said to them, 'Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.'" Matthew 4:19b (NRSV); see also Luke 5:11. Palgrave was a English Anglican, and also held a chair as professor of poetry at Oxford. The hymn appears neither in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

OLD 134 (S.M.)

1. Christ calls: 'Take up the cross,
O friends, then fol-low me,'
the night is dim,
the soles worn thin,
yet we fol-low free-ly.

2. Come faint and far the voice,
from vales of Gal-i-lee;
Vi-sion ere fades
in an-cient shades;
how do we serve free-ly?

3. O hea-vy cross of faith,
in what we can-not see,
as once re-store
the self of yore
as we fol-low free-ly.

4. If not as once you came
in true hu-man-i-ty
come yet with-in
as guest a-gain
so we fol-low free-ly.


5. With-in our heart of hearts,
in near-est near-ness be:
Set up a throne
with-in your own,
Christ, we fol-low free-ly.

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December 12, 2005

213R We Who Would Valiant Be

Original Title: "He Who Would Valiant Be," John Bunyan (1684), mod. Percy Dearmer in the English Hymnal (London 1906), MONKS GATE, 6.5.6.5.6.6.6.5., English Traditional Melody, adapt. Ralph Vaughan Williams (1906); New Title: "We Who Would Valiant Be," rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. John Bunyan, a Congregationalist and Baptist preacher in England, wrote these words in prison, in his work Pilgrim's Progress, for refusing to conform to the state church; the original title then was "Who Would True Valour See." Dreamer added the phrases "follow the Master" and "Lord, thou dost defend us with thy Spirit" only in 1906. These both become "Savior" in the United Church of Christ version published in the New Century Hymnal, paired with with tune ST. DUNSTAN'S, as no. 494. The version in Singing the Living Tradition, though as here set to the tune MONKS GATE as no. 206, eschews explicit identification of the Divine, in some senses truer to Bunyan than Dreamer (See no. 213S herein). The Dearmer version resonates with John 12:26a (NRSV): "Whoever serves me must follow me, and where I am, there will my servant be also." "When they had brought their boats to shore, they left everything and followed him," Luke 5:11

MONKS GATE (6.5.6.5.6.6.6.5.)

1. We who would va-liant be, come wind, come wea-ther,
fol-low in con-stan-cy the Day-star ev-er.
There’s no dis-cour-age-ment shall make us once re-lent
our first a-vowed in-tent to live as Pil-grims.

2. Who so be-set us round with dis-mal sto-ries
do but them-selves con-found— our strength the more is.
No foes shall stay our might; though we with gi-ants fight,
we will make good our right to live as Pil-grims.

3. Since, God, you e'er de-fend us with your spir-it,
we know we at the end, shall life in-her-it.
Then fanc-ies flee a-way! We’ll fear not what they say,
we’ll lab-or night and day to live as Pil-grims.

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July 24, 2006

613R Behold, O My Whole Heart

Title: "Behold, O My Whole Heart," Brady & Tate (1696), Psalm 138, adapted by REH (2007), MORNING SONG (CONSOLATION), C.M.D., Repository of Sacred Music (1813). Psalm 138 is a lectionary reading for Epiphany 5C, Proper 12C/Ordinary 17C, Proper 16A/Ordinary 21A, Proper 5B/Ordinary 10B. Most English versions translate the Hebrew in the first verse as "gods," though it equally means "goddess;" this is reflected in the lyrics below. Alternative hymn tunes include OLD 29TH, C.M.D., ALL SAINTS NEW, C.M.D., ST. THEODULPH, C.M.D.

MORNING SONG (CONSOLATION)(C.M.D.)

1. Be-hold, O my whole heart I'll bring,
and praise to God pro-claim;
be-fore the Queen of life I'll sing,
and bless the liv-ing name.
I'll cel-e-brate the sa-cred lights,
where-ev-er Love is found,
and bow my heart toward ho-ly sites,
where Wis-dom's words a-bound.

2. O God, you lend a lis-tening ear
when I cry out my heart;
and when my strength lies stuck in fear,
Love makes my dread de-part.
When lead-ers Wis-dom do pur-sue:
their hearts shall shout out praise.
Souls sing-ing of a king-dom true
shall show us of Love's ways.

3. The Most High treats the proud with scorn;
the poor, God tends their way:
And when in life as dan-gers warn,
grant safe-ty, come what may!
O Love whose pur-pos-es do last,
shall be my dwell-ing place;
And, mind-ful of each pro-mise past:
O Love, fill Earth and space.

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