March 13, 2005

13R Rejoice, You Pure In Heart

Original Title: "Rejoice, Ye Pure in Heart," Edward Hayes Pulmptre (1865), MARION, 6.6.8.6.4.6., Arthur Henry Messiter (1883); New Title: "Rejoice You Pure in Heart," rev. REH (2006), ICH HALTE TREULICH STILL, S.M.D., attributed to Bach (1736). The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but does appear in revised form as "Rejoice, You Pure in Heart," as no. 55 to MARION and as no. 71 to VINEYARD HAVEN in The New Century Hymnal. Pulmptre was a 19th century English Anglican. One hears Psalm 20 in lyrics about the "festal banner," the first line of Psalm 147 in the refrain, and Phillipians 4:4 in the title line and the refrain, "Rejoice . . . rejoice."

ICH HALTE TREULICH STILL (S.M.D.)

1. Re-joice, you pure in heart,
re-joice give thanks and sing;
your fes-tal ban-ner wave on high--
the cross of Christ rais-ing.

Refrain.
Re-joice, give thanks and sing; Re-joice, give thanks and sing;
Re-joice, re-joice, re-joice, and sing; Re-joice, give thanks and sing!

2. With all the an-gel choirs,
with all the saints of earth,
pour out the strains of joy and bliss,
true rap-ture, nob-lest mirth. Refrain.


3. Your clear ho-san-nas raise;
And al-le-lu-ias loud;
While an-swer-ing ech-oes up-ward float,
like wreaths of incense cloud. Refrain.

4. With voice as full and strong
as o-cean’s surg-ing praise,
send forth the hymns an-ces-tors loved,
the psalms of an-cient days. Refrain.

5. At last the toil shall end,
the wear-ied ones shall rest,
the pil-grims find the ho-ly home,
where saints are tru-ly blest. Refrain.

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2006 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 01:06 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

April 09, 2005

32R For the Beauty of the Earth

Original Title: "For the Beauty of the Earth," Folliott Sandford Pierpoint (1864), DIX, 7.7.7.7.7.7., Conrad Kocher (1838); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Pierpoint was English and Anglican. Isaiah 6:3b, "The Earth is full of [God's] glory." The hymn appears in The New Century Hymnal as no. 28 with the refrain "God of all;" it appears in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 21 with "Source of all." The original in Hymns of the Spirit Two is "Lord of all" in each verse.

DIX (7.7.7.7.7.7.)

1. For the beau-ty of the earth
for the glo-ry of the skies,
for the love which from our birth
ov-er and a-round us lies.
Light of all, to thee~we raise,
this our hymn of grate~ful praise.

2. For the beau-ty of each hour,
of the day and of the night,
hill and vale, and tree and flower,
sun and moon, and stars of light.
Love of all, to thee~we raise,
this our hymn of grate~ful praise.

3. For the joy of ear and eye,
for the heart and mind’s de-light,
for the mys-tic har-mo-ny
link-ing sense to sound and sight.
Life of all, to thee~we raise,
this, our hymn of grate~ful praise.

4. For the joy of hu-man love,
broth-er, sist-er, pa-rent, child,
friends on earth and friends a-bove,
for all gen-tle thoughts and mild.
Lord of all to thee~we raise,
this, our hymn of grate~ful praise. A-men.


Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2006 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 11:07 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

May 15, 2005

58R O Not In Far-Off Realms of Space

Original Title: "Go Not, My Soul, In Search of Him," Frederick Lucian Hosmer (1879), first tune, OLD 137TH, C.M.D., One and fiftie Psalms of David (1556), second tune, STRACATHRO, C.M, Charles Hutcheson (1832); New Title: "O Not In Far-Off Realms of Space," Frederick Lucian Hosmer (1879), alt. REH (2006), OLD 137TH, C.M.D. Hosmer, born 1840, was an American Unitarian minister, and graduate of Harvard Divinity School. Hosmer's "Go Not My Soul in Search of Him," as it is called in Hymns of the Spirit Two, does not seem to be casually matched with OLD 137TH, but instead seems to take Psalm 137 as a point of radical departure. While the psalm asks how the songs of Zion might be sung in the land of Babylon, in the land of the tormentors, Hosmer to the contrary responds "Soul with soul hath kin." While the original psalm speaks of the throne of Jerusalem as the only throne, Hosmer in dialogue seems again to suggest the contrary, instructing us that the throne of God is not anywhere else but in each soul. When the psalmist tell us that if Zion fades, the psalmist's own strength will fade, Hosmer teaches that the "inward sign" will herald the entire earth shining with "Deity." Rather than looking to Jerusalem, he would have us "repair" to the Jerusalem of the soul. See also Psalm 42:2 (NRSV) "My soul thirsts for God, for the living God. When shall I come and behold the face of God?" and ""Be still, and know that I am God!," Psalm 46:10. 'Thou hast visited the earth, thou hast watered it; thou greatly enrichest it," Psalm 65:9 (Darby). "All the earth is full of his glory," Isaiah 6:3 (KJV). "But whenever you pray, go into your room and shut the door and pray to your Father who is in secret," Matthew 6:6 (NRSV). Isaiah 40:22 (KJV), "It is he that sitteth upon the circle of the earth, and the inhabitants thereof are as grasshoppers; that stretcheth out the heavens as a curtain, and spreadeth them out as a tent to dwell in." Isaiah 54:2, "Enlarge the place of thy tent, and let them stretch forth the curtains of thine habitations: spare not, lengthen thy cords, and strengthen thy stakes." The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition or in The New Century Hymnal.

OLD 137TH (C.M.D.)

1. O not in far-off realms of space
the Spir-it has a throne;
But in each heart finds a true place,
yet wait-ing to be known.
Search not, my soul, a-far in vain:
you will not find God there;
Nor in the depths of sha-dows wane,
nor in the heights of air.

2. Thought ans-wer-ing a-lone to thought,
as Soul with soul has kin;
The out-ward God one rec-kons not
who finds not God with-in.
And if the vi-sion comes rich-ly
re-vealed by in-ward sign,
Earth will be full of De-i-ty
and with full glo-ry shine!

3. You shall not want for com-pa-ny,
nor pitch a tent a-lone;
Th'in-dwell-ing God will go free-ly,
and show you of Life's own.
Search not for God a-far in space,
but to your-self re-pair;
Wait then with-in that si-lent grace,
and you shall find Love there!

Word File
PDF File
Download file

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2006 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 10:18 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

June 13, 2005

82R Thou Hidden Love of God

Original Title: "Thou Hidden Love of God," Gerhard Tersteegen (1729) trans. John Wesley (1738) GOTTLOB, ES GEHT, 8.8.8.8.8.8., German Chorale, harm. J. S. Bach (1747); New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2008), same hymn tune.

GOTTLOB, ES GEHT (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. Thou hid-den love of God, whose height,
Whose depth un-fath-omed no one knows,
I see from far thy beau-teous light,
In-ly I sigh for thy re-pose;
My heart is pained, nor can it be
At rest, till it finds rest in thee.

2. Thy se-cret voice in-vites me still
The sweet-ness of thy yoke to prove;
And fain I would: but though my will
Seems fixed, yet wide my pas-sions rove;
Yet hind-ranc-es strew all the way;
I aim at thee, yet from thee stray.

3. 'Tis mer-cy all, that thou hast brought
My mind to seek true peace in thee;
Yet, while I seek but find thee not,
No peace my wand-'ring soul shall see.
Oh, when shall all my wand-'rings end,
And all my steps to thee-ward tend?

4. O Love, thy sove-reign aid im-part,
To save me from low-thought-ed care;
Chase this self-will through all my heart,
Through all its la-tent maz-es there;
Make me thy du-teous child, that I
Cease-less may Ab-ba, Ab-ba, cry!

5. Each mo-ment draw from earth a-way
My heart which low-ly waits thy call;
Speak to my in-most soul and say
'I am thy Love, thy God, thy All.'
To feel thy power, to hear thy voice,
To taste thy love, be all my choice.

PDF File
Noteworthy Composer File

Psalm 5:3 (NRSV), "O Lord, in the morning you hear my voice; in the morning I plead my case to you, and watch;" Psalm 46:10, "Be still, and know that I am God!;" Psalm 108:4, "For your steadfast love is higher than the heavens, and your faithfulness reaches to the clouds;" Psalm 131:2, Matthew 5:7, “Blessed are the merciful, for they will receive mercy;" Matthew 14:23, [H]e went up the mountain by himself to pray. When evening came, he was there alone;" Mark 1:35; 1 Corinthians 7:29-31; Ephesians 5:15-20.

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2008 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

HOME PAGE

A PDF file can be prepared in a larger font should users wish to have a printout extend to two pages upon request. Differences from Hymns of the Spirit Two are truly minimal; in the first verse, the original reads "no man know;" in the third verse, it reads "her peace in thee;" in the fourth verse, "Abba, Father, cry!" I considered changing the third versed to "Abba, Amma, cry!," but rejected this in favor of something more "historically" accurate. Whatever gendered references there are to the divine here are subtle, and one can only hope more than acceptable given their provenance. In terms of balance, the "hidden love of God" and "thy secret voice" are considerably feminine images by way of contrast.

The Webmaster generally makes inquiry to anyone who may wish to undertake a translation of Gerhard Tersteegen's hymn, entitled "Verborgne Gottesliebe du," into something more (post-)modern while maintaining the integrity of the work.

The tune here, GOTTLOB, ES GEHT, appears to be related to an earlier hymn, GOTTLOB ES GEHT NUNMEHR ZU ENDE, 8.8.8.8. The former repeats the first eight measures of the later. The score of the hymn tune here is in F-sharp while in Hymns of the Spirit Two in appears in B-flat and in a slightly simpler rhythm.

Posted by rehurst at 09:49 PM | Comments (0)

July 03, 2005

103R Awake Our Souls! Away Our Fears!

Orginal Title: "Awake Our Souls! Away Our Fears!" Issac Watts (1707), TRURO (L.M.), Psalmodia Evangelica (1789); No changes here. It does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal. 2 Corinthians 5:17b (NRSV), "[E]verything old has passed away; see, everything has become new!"

TRURO (L.M.)

1. A-wake, our souls! a-way, our fears!
Let eve-ry trem-bling thought be gone!
A-wake, and run the heaven-ly race,
and put a cheer-ful cour-age on.

2. True, ’tis a strait and thorn-y road,
and mor-tal spir-its tire and faint;
But they for-get the migh-ty God,
that feeds the strength of eve-ry saint.


3. O migh-ty God, thy match-less power
is ev-er new, and ev-er young;
And firm en-dures, while end-less years
their ev-er-last-ing cir-cles run.

4. From thee, the ev-er flow-ing spring,
Our souls shall drink a fresh sup-ply;
While such as trust their na-tive strength
shall melt a-way, and droop, and die.

5. Swift as the ea-gle cuts the air,
we’ll mount a-loft to thine a-bode;
On wings of love our souls shall fly,
nor tire a-long the heaven-ly road.


Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2005 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 08:41 PM | Comments (0)