March 09, 2005

9R Our God, Our God, Thou Shinest Here

Original Title: "Our God, Our God, Thou Shinest Here," Thomas Hornblower Gil (1846), CORONATION, 8.6.8.6.8.6., Oliver Holden (1793); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), MORNING SONG, 8.6.8.6.8.6., at­trib­ut­ed to Elkan­ah K. Dare (1782-1826), arranged by C. W. Douglas. Thomas Hornblower Gil was a lay English Unitarian hymn writer, who later joined the Congregational Church. He wrote nearly 200 hymns, and had definitive ideas about what a hymn should be: "Hymns are not meant to be theological statements, expositions of doctrine, or enunciations of precepts; they are utterances of the soul in its manifold moods of hope and fear, joy and sorrow, love, wonder, and aspiration. ... Hymns are meant and made to be sung. The best and most glorious hymns cannot be more exactly defined than as divine love songs." The lyrics here seem to speak of the Gospel of John: "The true light, which enlightens everyone, was coming into the world." John 1:9. "[John] came as a witness to testify to the light." John 1:7a. The hymn does not appear in either Singing the Living Tradition or in The New Century Hymnal.

MORNING SONG (8.6.8.6.8.6.)

1. Our God, our God, thou shin-est here,
thine own this lat-ter day.
To us thy ra-diant steps ap-pear,
here goes thy glo-rious way!
To us thy ra-diant steps ap-pear,
here goes thy glo-rious way!

2. We shine not on-ly with the light
thou shed-dest down of yore.
On us thou stream-est strong and bright,
thy com-ings are not o'er.
On us thou stream-est strong and bright,
thy com-ings are not o'er.

3. All op-en to our souls shall be
thy glo-ry's hi-ding-place.
Our mo-thers had not all of thee,
new births are in thy grace;
Our fa-thers had not all of thee,
new births are in thy grace.

4. Thou come-est here, thou stand-est by,
our work be-gins to shine.
Thou dwell-est with us migh-ti-ly,
on comes the years di-vine!
Thou dwell-est with us migh-ti-ly,
on comes the years di-vine!

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March 10, 2005

10R Royal Almighty On High

Original Title: "Come, Thou Almighty King," Anonymous (before 1757), ITALIAN HYMN, 6.6.4.6.6.6.4., Felice Giardini (1769); New Title: "Royal Almighty on High," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. The hymn first appeared in George Whitefield's Collection of Hymns for Social Worship (1757); some attribute the hymn to Charles Wesley. The tune ITALIAN HYMN was written specifically for the hymn. "God reigneth over the nations; God sitteth upon the throne of his holiness." Psalm 47:8; see also Revelation 19:6, Isaiah 52:7. "Wisdom has built her house . . .She has sent out her servant-girls, she calls from the highest places in the town," Proverbs 9:1-3. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but it does appear in The New Century Hymnal as "Come Now, Almighty God," as no. 275.

ITALIAN HYMN (6.6.4.6.6.6.4.)

1. Roy-al Al-migh~ty on high,
to you our prais-es fly;
Your name we raise,
Fa-ther all-glo-ri-ous,
Mo-ther vic-to-ri-ous,
come and reign o-ver us,
An-cient of Days.

2. Come now all-gra-cious Lord,
by heaven and earth a-dored;
our prayer at-tend;
Wis-dom, your chil-dren bless,
give your good word suc-cess;
Make your own ho-li-ness
on us des-cend.

3. Ne-ver from us de-part,
but rule in ev-ery heart;
hence, e-ver-more.
Your sove-reign ma-jes-ty
may we in glo-ry see,
and to e-ter-ni-ty,
love and a-dore. A-men.

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April 12, 2005

35R Let the Whole Creation Cry

Original Title: "Let the Whole Creation Cry," Stopford Augustus Brooke, VIENNA, 7.7.7.7., Justin Heinrich Knecht (1799); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Brooke was a 19th Century Irish writer and churchman, first ordained in the Chruch of England, but later he officiated as a Unitarian minister at Bedford chapel, Bloomsbury. Psalm 148:5, "On the glorious splendor of your majesty,and on your wondrous works, I will meditate." (ESV). Neither Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal contains the hymn. The website maintained by St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church includes a paraphrase of Psalm 148 called "The Furthest Depths of Outer Space" with words by Matthew Priest, to the tune KISSLING, 8.8.6.8.8.6., which may be locally reproduced.

VIENNA (7.7.7.7.)

1. Let the whole cre-a-tion cry:
Glo-ry be to God on high!
Sun and moon, up-lift your voice,
night and stars, in God re-joice!


2. Chant out ho-nor, o-cean fair!
Earth, soft rush-ing through the air!
Sun-shine, dark-ness, cloud and storm,
rain and snow high praise per-form.

3. Let the blos-soms of the earth
join the u-ni-ver-sal mirth;
Birds, with morn and dew e-late,
sing with joy at heav-en's gate.


4. All souls on the side of right,
pro-phets speak-ing words of might;
Po-ets, fight-ers, ar-ti-sans:
Raise the anth-em once a-gain!

5. And let chil-dren's hap-py hearts
in this wor-ship bear their parts:
Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly, cry,
Glo-ry be to God on high!

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April 15, 2005

38R The Harp at Nature's Advent Strung

Original Title: "The Harp at Nature's Advent Strung," John Greenleaf Whittier, EVAN, C.M., William Henry Havergal, arranged by Lowell Mason (1850); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), LLANGLOFLAN, 8.6.8.6., Welsh Hymn Melody. Whittier was an anti-slavery Quaker and poet, who was secretary of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Though born in Boston, he lived in Philadelphia where he edited the Pennsylvania Freeman. The complete, original poem, called "The Worship of Nature" contains ten verses, rather than the six below, or the five in Hymns of the Spirit Two and the five in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 74 (It is not contained in The New Century Hymnal). Though anthologized in The Complete Poetical Works of John Greenleaf Whittier, (Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1894), the poem was first published in 1867. "All the earth . . . make music to the Lord with the harp, with the harp and the sound of singing, . . .Let the sea resound, and everything in it, the world, and all who live in it." Psalm 98:4-7

LLANGLOFLAN (8.6.8.6.)

1. The harp at Na-ture's ad-vent strung
has never ceas-ed to play;
the song the stars of morn-ing sung
has ne-ver died a-way.
And prayer is made, and praise is given,
by all things near and far;
the o-cean look-eth up to heaven,
and mirr-ors eve-ry star.

2. Its waves are kneel-ing on the strand,
as kneels the hu-man knee,
their white locks bow-ing to the sand,
the priest-hood of the sea!
The green earth sends its in-cense up
from many a moun-tain shrine;
from fold-ed leaf and de-wy cup
and pours a sacr-ed wine.

3. The blue sky is the tem-ple's arch,
its tran-sept earth and air,
the mu-sic of its star-ry march
the cho-rus of a prayer.
So Na-ture keeps the re-verent frame
with which the years be-gan,
and all the signs and voi-ces shame
the prayer-less heart a-gain.

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May 10, 2005

55R Spirit of Life, Attend Our Prayer

Original Title: "Spirit Divine, Attend Our Prayer," Andrew Reed (1829), adapted by Samuel Longfellow, first tune, PRESERVATION, C.M., Johann Georg Christian Stoerl, second tune, ARLINGTON, C.M., Thomas Augustine Arne (1762); New Title: "Spirit of Life, Attend Our Prayer," rev. REH (2006), WINDSOR, C.M., Damon's Psalmes (1591). "Prophesy unto the Spirit, prophesy, son of man, and thou hast said unto the Spirit: Thus said the Lord Jehovah: From the four winds come in, O Spirit, and breathe on these slain, and they do live," Ezekiel 37:9 (YLT); see also Isaiah 34:16. Psalm 143:10, "Thy Spirit [is] good, Lead me into a land of uprightness," see also Psalm 51:11, Psalm 139:7, John 16:13. Acts 2:3 (KJV), "And there appeared unto them cloven tongues like as of fire, and it sat upon each of them," see also Isaiah 6:6-7, Hebrews 1:7, I Chronicles 21:26, Psalm 39:3. Romans 8:2 (KJV), "For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death." Proverbs 1:20-23 (NRSV), "Wisdom cries out in the street; in the squares she raises her voice . . .'I will pour out my thoughts to you,'" see also Proverbs 8:1, Proverbs 9:1,6, Proverbs 22:11-12. Ephesians 6:18 (KJV), "Praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit." Neither Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal includes the hymn.

WINDSOR (C.M.)

1. Spir-it of Life, at-tend our prayer,
and make our hearts your home;
de-scend with all your gra-cious power;
O come, great Spir-it, come!


2. Come as the light! to us re-veal
The truth we long to know;
And lead us in the path of life
Where all the vir-tuous go.

3. Come as the fire! and cleanse our hearts,
with sanc-ti-fy-ing flame,
till our whole souls de-vo-tion make
in love's re-deem-ing name.

4. Come as the dew, and sweet-ly bless
this con-sec-rat-ed hour;
till eve-ry bar-ren place shall own
with joy your quicken-ing power.


5. Come as the wind, O breath of God!
O Wis-dom-bear-ing grace!
Come, make your great sal-va-tion known,
wide as the hu-man race.

6. Spir-it Di-vine, at-tend our prayer;
Make a lost world thy home;
Des-cend with all thy gra-cious powers,
O come, great Spir-it, come.

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May 15, 2005

58R O Not In Far-Off Realms of Space

Original Title: "Go Not, My Soul, In Search of Him," Frederick Lucian Hosmer (1879), first tune, OLD 137TH, C.M.D., One and fiftie Psalms of David (1556), second tune, STRACATHRO, C.M, Charles Hutcheson (1832); New Title: "O Not In Far-Off Realms of Space," Frederick Lucian Hosmer (1879), alt. REH (2006), OLD 137TH, C.M.D. Hosmer, born 1840, was an American Unitarian minister, and graduate of Harvard Divinity School. Hosmer's "Go Not My Soul in Search of Him," as it is called in Hymns of the Spirit Two, does not seem to be casually matched with OLD 137TH, but instead seems to take Psalm 137 as a point of radical departure. While the psalm asks how the songs of Zion might be sung in the land of Babylon, in the land of the tormentors, Hosmer to the contrary responds "Soul with soul hath kin." While the original psalm speaks of the throne of Jerusalem as the only throne, Hosmer in dialogue seems again to suggest the contrary, instructing us that the throne of God is not anywhere else but in each soul. When the psalmist tell us that if Zion fades, the psalmist's own strength will fade, Hosmer teaches that the "inward sign" will herald the entire earth shining with "Deity." Rather than looking to Jerusalem, he would have us "repair" to the Jerusalem of the soul. See also Psalm 42:2 (NRSV) "My soul thirsts for God, for the living God. When shall I come and behold the face of God?" and ""Be still, and know that I am God!," Psalm 46:10. 'Thou hast visited the earth, thou hast watered it; thou greatly enrichest it," Psalm 65:9 (Darby). "All the earth is full of his glory," Isaiah 6:3 (KJV). "But whenever you pray, go into your room and shut the door and pray to your Father who is in secret," Matthew 6:6 (NRSV). Isaiah 40:22 (KJV), "It is he that sitteth upon the circle of the earth, and the inhabitants thereof are as grasshoppers; that stretcheth out the heavens as a curtain, and spreadeth them out as a tent to dwell in." Isaiah 54:2, "Enlarge the place of thy tent, and let them stretch forth the curtains of thine habitations: spare not, lengthen thy cords, and strengthen thy stakes." The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition or in The New Century Hymnal.

OLD 137TH (C.M.D.)

1. O not in far-off realms of space
the Spir-it has a throne;
But in each heart finds a true place,
yet wait-ing to be known.
Search not, my soul, a-far in vain:
you will not find God there;
Nor in the depths of sha-dows wane,
nor in the heights of air.

2. Thought ans-wer-ing a-lone to thought,
as Soul with soul has kin;
The out-ward God one rec-kons not
who finds not God with-in.
And if the vi-sion comes rich-ly
re-vealed by in-ward sign,
Earth will be full of De-i-ty
and with full glo-ry shine!

3. You shall not want for com-pa-ny,
nor pitch a tent a-lone;
Th'in-dwell-ing God will go free-ly,
and show you of Life's own.
Search not for God a-far in space,
but to your-self re-pair;
Wait then with-in that si-lent grace,
and you shall find Love there!

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September 30, 2005

167R Still the Night, Holy the Night

STILLE NACHT (Irregular)

1. Still the night, Ho-ly the night,
all is calm, all is bright;
Round yon faith-ful ten-der pair,
ho-ly in-fant with cur-ly hair;
Sleep in hea-ven-ly peace;
Sleep in hea-ven-ly peace.

2. Still the night, Ho-ly the night,
shep-herds first saw the sight,
heard re-sound-ing, clear and strong,
far and near, the an-gels' song,
Christ, Re-deem-er is here,
Christ, Re-deem-er is here.

3. Still the night, Ho-ly the night,
won-drous star, lend your light;
O an-gels, who God's bles-sings bring;
'Al-le-lu-ia' ever we sing!
Je-sus, Sav-ior is born;
Je-sus, Sav-ior is born.


4. Still the night, Ho-ly the night,
by God's love, by God's might,
the Cre-a-tor sent down grace,
through the Christ child in gentle em-brace
to all child-ren on earth,
to all child-ren on earth.

5. Still the night, Ho-ly the night,
sent down from hea-ven's height;
Love is smi-ling from thy face;
Strikes for us now the hour of grace;
Sav-ior since thou art born;
Sav-ior since thou art born.


6. Still the night, Ho-ly the night,
all shines dim save thy light,
shin-ing where the par-ents mild
keep watch ov-er the ho-ly child;
Sleep in heav-en-ly peace;
Sleep in heav-en-ly peace.

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December 04, 2005

206R O Love! O Light!

Original Title: "O Love! O Light!", John Greenleaf Whittier (1866), ST. AGNES, C.M., John Bacchus Dykes (1866); New Title: "O Love! O Light!," rev. REH (2005), Same hymn tune. The hymn is not included in either Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal, but the tune does appear as no. 281 and nos. 507-08 in the latter. Whittier was an 19th Century American Quaker poet, and a well-known advocate of the abolition of slavery in the United States. The biblical sources of the names used in the hymn are numerous; John 13:13, John 1:1, John 15:15. Also there is a resonance of St. Paul's hymn that speak of peering "through a glass, darkly." 1 Corinthians 13:12. The feast of Transfiguration is again a topic here.

ST. AGNES (C.M.)

1. O Love! O Life! Our faith and sight
your pres-ence now makes one,
as through trans-fig-ured clouds of white
we trace the noon-day sun.

2. So, to our mor-tal minds sub-dued,
flesh-veiled, but not con-cealed,
we know in you the par-ent-hood
and heart of God re-vealed.


3. We faint-ly know, dim-ly per-ceive,
in dif-fering phrase we pray;
In you, dim or clear, we own free
the Light, the Truth, the Way!


4. To do your will is more than praise,
as words are less than deeds;
and sim-ple trust can find your ways
we miss with chart of creeds.

5. Our friend, our kind-red, and our word,
What may your ser-vice be?
Nor name, nor form, nor ri-tual heard,
but fol-low-ing free-ly.


6. Your li-ta-nies, sweet of-fi-ces
of love and gra-ti-tude;
your sa-cred, di-vine li-tur-gies,
the joy of do-ing good.

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January 04, 2006

431R All Souls, O God, Are Thine

Original Title: "All Souls, O Lord, Are Thine," Epes Sargent (1813-1880), LANGRAN, 10.10.10.10., James Langran (1863); New Title, "All Souls, O God, Are Thine," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Sargent was a Universalist minister in the United States. "[Christ] has made known to us the mystery of his will, according to his good pleasure that he set forth in Christ, as a plan for the fullness of time, to gather up all things in him, things in heaven and things on earth," Ephesians 1:9-10. "But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels, for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honor; that he, by the grace of God, should taste death for every man," Hebrews 2:9. "And he is the propitiation for our sins; and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world," 1 John 2:2. "The Savior of all, especially those who believe." 1 Timothy 4:10. "God [is] All in All," 1 Corinthians 15:28. The hymn does not appear in The New Century Hymnal nor (astonishingly) in Singing the Living Tradition.

LANGRAN (10.10.10.10.)

1. All souls, O God, are thine, as-sur-ance blest!
Thine, not our own to rob of help di-vine;
not ours to doom by an-y hu-man test,
but thine, O gra-cious God, and on-ly thine.

2. Thine, by thy va-rious dis-ci-plines, to lead
to heights where heaven-ly truths im-mort-al shine,
truths none e-ter-nal-ly shall fail to heed;
for all, O God, are thine, for-ev-er thine.

3. For-give the thought, that ev-er-last-ing ill
to a-ny can be part of thy de-sign;
fi-nite, im-per-fect, er-ring, guil-ty-- still
all souls, great God, are thine-- and mer-cy thine. A-men.

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January 05, 2006

546R Faith of the Martyrs, Living Still

Original Title: "Faith of Our Fathers, Living Still," adapted from Frederick William Faber (1849), ST. CATHERINE, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Henri Frederick Hemi (1865); New Title: "Faith of the Martyrs," rev. REH (2006), same hyme tune. Though the son of an Anglican cleric, Faber was a Roman Catholic priest. The hymn speaks of the persecution of Catholics in Britain; the original spoke of "Mary's prayers" that would set Britain free. Its position in Hymns of the Spirit Two (1937) is of note; as no. 546, it is the first hymn in the section marked "SUPPLEMENT." Many of these hymns were reckoned to be tunes of lesser quality, popular with the more rural Universalists. Oddly, however, "Faith of Our Fathers" does not appear in the prior hymnal published by the Universalists, Hymns of the Church (Boston: 1917) (though Reginald Heber's "Forth From the Dark and Stormy Sky" appears therein to ST. CATHERINE, a tune which does not appear anywhere other than at no. 546 in Hymns of the Spirit Two). It may be that its Catholic pedigree (Universalists were generally less anti-Catholic than Unitarians and other Protestants of the day) and the theme of persecution made the hymn appropriate for the "Universalist" section. In New England, the Unitarians were originally part of the "Standing Order" of (state-supported) Puritan/Congregational churches until in some cases the middle part of the 19th century; such standing did not apply to the (relatively speaking, persecuted) Universalists. The lyrics echo Hebrews 11:1-2 (NRSV), "Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen. Indeed, by faith our ancestors received approval." They also obliquely refer to the story in Mark regarding John the Baptist, "she rushed back to the king and requested, 'I want you to give me at once the head of John the Baptist on a platter,' . . . Immediately the king sent a soldier of the guard with orders to bring John's head. He went and beheaded him in the prison, brought his head on a platter," Mark 6:25-28. One too is reminded of Job in the Hebrew Bible, "But [God] knows the way that I take; when he has tested me, I shall come out like gold," Job 23:10. "Then the Lord answered Job out of the whirlwind: . . . Gird up your loins . . . I will question you, and you shall declare to me," Job 38:1-3. "Then Job answered the Lord: 'I know that you can do all things, and that no purpose of yours can be thwarted,'" Job 42:1-2. The hymn's lyrical change to "Faith of Our Mothers" is more than fanciful political correction; while the Congregational Church claims the first woman ordained to Christain ministry in the United States, the Universalists claim the first woman approved to the ministry at the denominational level, in the person of Olympia Brown. In the Midwest, female preaching "circuit riders" (including the celebrated Iowa Sisterhood) famously spread the liberating gospel of the faith. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but does appear as "Faith of the Martyrs, Living Still," as no. 381, in The New Century Hymnal.

ST. CATHERINE (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. Faith of the mar-tyrs, liv-ing still,
in spite of dun-geon, fire and sword;
O how our hearts beat high with joy
when-e'er we hear that glo-rious word!
Faith of the mar-tyrs, ho-ly faith!
We will be true through life and death.

2. Faith of our fa-thers, we will strive
to dwell with all souls peace-ful-ly;
and through the truth that comes from God,
we all shall then be tru-ly free.
Faith of our fa-thers, ho-ly faith!
We will be true through life and death.

3. Our for-bears chained in pri-son dim
were still in heart and con-science free;
and blessed would be our own lives' fate
if we, like them, should live for thee.
Faith of our for-bears, ho-ly faith!
We will be true through life and death.

4. Faith of our mo-thers, we will love
both friend and foe in all our strife;
and preach thee, too, as love knows how
by kind-ly words and vir-tuous life.
Faith of our mo-thers, ho-ly faith!
We will be true through life and death.

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