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July 12, 2006

608R Soon God's Redeeming Grace Will Come

Title: "Soon God's Redeeming Grace Will Come," Anonymous, rev. REH (2006), WINCHESTER NEW, L.M., Musikalisches Handbuch (1690). Based on Psalm 85:9-13. The original hymn, which does not appear in Hymns of the Spirit Two (1937), is entitled "Lord, Thou Hast Greatly Blessed Our Land," Anonymous, REPENTANCE, L.M., Theodore E. Perkins (1831-1912). Psalm 85, or parts thereof, constitutes a lectionary reading for Proper 14A/Ordinary 19A, Advent 2B, Proper 10B/Ordinary 15B, and Proper 12C/Ordinary 17C.

WINCHESTER NEW (L.M.)

1. Soon God's re-deem-ing grace will come;
all souls new-mind-ed will be-come;
and glo-ry through our land shall dwell,
when we do heed Love's teach-ings well.

2. Now truth a-grees with mer-cy's bliss;
the law and peace come forth to kiss;
be-hold the truth from earth a-rise,
with jus-tice shin-ing from the skies.

3. The Ho-ly will send bles-sings down;
green har-vests all the land shall crown;
wide whole-some-ness be-fore us lies;
our sure foot-steps are Life's sur-mise. A-men.

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609R Your Burning Love

Title: "Your Burning Love," adaped by REH (2007) from The Psalter (1912), Psalm 30; MEIRIONYDD, 7.6.7.6. D, William Freeman Lloyd (1840). Psalm 30 is an appointed reading for Epiphany 6B, Proper 8B/Ordinary 13B, Easter 3C, Proper 5C/Ordinary 10 and Proper 9C/Ordinary 14C.

MEIRIONYDD (7.6.7.6. D)

1. Your burn-ing love de-liv-ered;
in sweet love songs I cried;
my harsh-est cri-tics suf-fered
in si-lence midst my slide.
O Hard-ened Truth, I sought you;
your strength my heart did save;
O you did teach me wis-dom,
whose path is long and brave.

2. Love's ho-ly name re-mem-ber,
all souls, give thanks and praise!
Life's sor-rows last a mo-ment;
God's fa-vor lasts al-ways;
for sor-row, like a pil-grim,
may come to stay the night,
but joy the soul will glad-den
when dawns the mor-ning light.

3. In gol-den days I boast-ed,
"A moun-tain I re-main!"
O God, with pleas-ing fa-vor,
the high-land crests sus-tain.
Then my life near-ly crumb-led,
no more I heard you speak,
and cried a-loud, "O dear God;"
your mys-tery did I seek.

4. Who'd pro-fit if we per-ished,
if our lives were not spared?
Would dust then sing out prais-es;
how would Truth be de-clared?
O God, send down com-pass-ion,
and our de-si-res hear;
the heart needs you as lov-er:
O Spir-it soon ap-pear!

5. Lo, heart-ache turns to dan-ces,
to you great thanks all raise,
who took a-way this sad-ness,
and lift-ed all in praise!
So now, no lon-ger si-lent,
with burn-ing love all sing:
"O Sweet-est God, for-ev-er,"
and thanks on high do bring!

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July 14, 2006

610R My Soul Shall Bless the Soul of All

Title: "My Soul Shall Bless the Soul of All," William Cowper, Olney Hymns (London: 1779), TRURO, L.M., Thomas Williams, Psalmodia Evangelica, (1789); rev. REH (2006). Paraphrase of Pslam 34:1-8, which is a lectionary reading for All Saints A, Proper 14B/Ordinary 19B, and Proper 25B/Ordinary 30B.

TRURO (L.M.)

1. My soul shall bless the Soul of all,
my praise shall climb to God's a-bode;
O Ho-ly One, whose name I call,
the great Su-preme, the lov-ing God.

2. With-out be-gin-ning, or de-cline,
Ob-ject of faith, and not of sense;
e-ter-nal a-ges saw you shine,
and shine e-ter-nal a-ges hence.

3. Of all the crowns O God you bear,
for-give-ness is your dear-est claim;
that gra-cious sound well-pleased you hear,
who owns "God-with-us" as a name.


4. A cheer-ful con-fi-dence I feel,
my well-placed hopes with joy I see;
my bo-som glows with heaven-ly zeal
to wor-ship one who loves free-ly.

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611R Mary, First One to the Tomb

Title: 'Mary, First One to the Tomb," John Newton (1779), rev. REH (2006), GOTT SEI DANK, 7.7.7.7., Johann A. Freylinghausen (1704). Newton's orignal title was "Mary, to her Savior's Tomb." Matthew 28:1; Mark 16:1-9, Luke 24:10, John 20:1 (KJV), "The first day of the week cometh Mary Magdalene early, when it was yet dark, unto the sepulchre, and seeth the stone taken away from the sepulchre," see also John 20:1-18. The "feast day" of Mary Magdalene, or Mary of Magdala, is July 22, in Roman Catholic and other more "liturgical" churches. All the same, many in the free church sometimes choose to celebrate this woman of vision and courage as a pioneer of faith.

GOTT SEI DANK (7.7.7.7.)

1. Ma-ry, first one to the tomb,
swift-ly at the ear-ly dawn;
spice she brought, and sweet per-fume;
The Be-lov-ed One was gone.


2. The Mag-da-lene weep-ing stood,
struck with sor-row and sur-prise;
shed-ding tears, a plen-teous flood,
for the heart sup-plied her eyes.

3. Jes-us, as if al-ways near,
though too oft-en un-per-ceived,
came, a true lead-er to cheer,
asked to her soul, why she grieved?


4. What a change liv-ing words make,
turn-ing our nights in-to day!
All who e'er weep for Life’s sake,
Love will wipe your tears a-way.

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Many will find that the following version matches the meter better:

1. Ma-ry, first one to the tomb,
Swift-ly at the ear-ly dawn;
Spice she brought, and sweet per-fume;
The Be-loved One had ere gone.

2. There she of Mag-da-la stood,
Struck with sor-row and sur-prise;
Shed-ding tears, a plen-teous flood,
For the heart sup-plied her eyes.

3. Jes-us, as if al-ways near,
Though too oft-en un-per-ceived,
Came, a lead-er true to cheer,
Asked to her soul, why she grieved?

4. What a change di-vine words make,
Turn-ing our nights in-to day;
All who e'er weep for Life’s sake,
Love will wipe your tears a-way!

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July 19, 2006

612R God of All Worlds

Original Title: "Lord of All Worlds," John Quincy Adams (1767-1848); New Title: "God of All Worlds," rev. REH (2006), DEUS TUORUM MILITUM, L.M.D., Grenoble Antiphoner (1753). Paraphrase of Psalm 14. Adams was the sixth President of the United States. A Unitarian, he wrote metrical versions of the psalms and several hymns. He is buried at the historic First Parish Church (Unitarian) in Quincy, Massachusetts.

DEUS TUORUM MILITUM (L.M.D.)

1. God of all worlds, let thanks and praise
to you for-ev-er fill my soul;
with bles-sings you have crowned my days,
my heart, my head, my hand con-trol.
O, let no vain pre-sump-tions rise,
no im-pious mur-mur in my heart,
to crave what-e'er your will de-nies,
or shrink from what your hands im-part.

2. Your child am I, and not an hour,
re-vol-ving in the orbs a-bove,
but brings some to-ken of your power,
but brings some to-ken of your love;
and shall this bo-som dare re-pine,
in night time dare de-ny the dawn,
or spurn the trea-sures of the mine,
be-cause one dia-mond is with-drawn?

3. Some souls do doubt, and not a-lone
your be-ing, God, and bound-less might,
but doubt the fir-ma-ment, your throne,
and doubt the sun’s me-ri-dian light;
and doubt the fa-shion of one's frame,
the voice one hears, the breath one draws;
O way-laid mor-tals, who pro-claim
ef-fects un-num-bered with-out cause!

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July 24, 2006

613R Behold, O My Whole Heart

Title: "Behold, O My Whole Heart," Brady & Tate (1696), Psalm 138, adapted by REH (2007), MORNING SONG (CONSOLATION), C.M.D., Repository of Sacred Music (1813). Psalm 138 is a lectionary reading for Epiphany 5C, Proper 12C/Ordinary 17C, Proper 16A/Ordinary 21A, Proper 5B/Ordinary 10B. Most English versions translate the Hebrew in the first verse as "gods," though it equally means "goddess;" this is reflected in the lyrics below. Alternative hymn tunes include OLD 29TH, C.M.D., ALL SAINTS NEW, C.M.D., ST. THEODULPH, C.M.D.

MORNING SONG (CONSOLATION)(C.M.D.)

1. Be-hold, O my whole heart I'll bring,
and praise to God pro-claim;
be-fore the Queen of life I'll sing,
and bless the liv-ing name.
I'll cel-e-brate the sa-cred lights,
where-ev-er Love is found,
and bow my heart toward ho-ly sites,
where Wis-dom's words a-bound.

2. O God, you lend a lis-tening ear
when I cry out my heart;
and when my strength lies stuck in fear,
Love makes my dread de-part.
When lead-ers Wis-dom do pur-sue:
their hearts shall shout out praise.
Souls sing-ing of a king-dom true
shall show us of Love's ways.

3. The Most High treats the proud with scorn;
the poor, God tends their way:
And when in life as dan-gers warn,
grant safe-ty, come what may!
O Love whose pur-pos-es do last,
shall be my dwell-ing place;
And, mind-ful of each pro-mise past:
O Love, fill Earth and space.

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July 27, 2006

614R Part in Peace

Original Title: "Part in Peace: Is Day Before Us?," Sarah F. Adams, in Hymns and Anthems, by William Johnson Fox (London: 1841), BEATRICE, 8.7.8.7., Wiliam C. Coe (1895); New Title: "Part in Peace (This Day Before Us)", rev. REH (2006), STUTTGART, 8.7.8.7., Christian Friedrich Witt in Psalmodia Sacra (Gotha 1715). "Depart in peace," James 2:16 (KJV). Adams was a English Unitarian, best known for the hymn "Nearer My God to Thee."

STUTTGART (8.7.8.7.)

1. Part in peace, this day be-fore us;
praise the Name, for life and light;
when the sha-dows leng-then o'er us,
bless the Love that guards the night.

2. Part in peace, with deep thanks-giv-ing,
ren-der, when we're home-ward bound,
gra-cious ser-vice in our liv-ing,
tran-quil beau-ty all a-round.

3. Part in peace, such are the prais-es
God our Ma-ker lov-eth best;
such the wor-ship that up-rais-es
hu-man hearts to heav-en-ly rest.

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July 28, 2006

615R All Praise the Life (Which Gives Us Voice)

Original Title: "I'll Praise My Maker," Isaac Watts (1719), OLD 113TH, 8.8.8.8.8.8., attributed to Matthäus Greiter, Strassburger Kirchenamt (1525); New Title: "All Praise the Life (Which Gives Us Voice)," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. A paraphrase of Psalm 146, all or parts of which are a lectionary reading for Advent 3A, Proper 18B/Ordinary 23B, Proper 26B/Ordinary 31B, Proper 27B/Ordinary 32B, Proper 5C/Ordinary 10C and Proper 21C/Ordinary 26C. Though the hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal, but some may find the John Wesley version of Isaac Watts' hymn, that appears as no. 253 in a further revised version (1988) in The Presbyterian Hymnal (1990), "I'll Praise My Maker," OLD 113TH, of use in their local or congregational settings.

OLD 113TH (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. All praise the Life which gives us voice!
Sing out songs, cease-less-ly re-joice!
Praise shall em-ploy our no-blest drives;
rul-ers de-part; their pomp, their power;
vain thoughts, all van-ish in the hour:
But Time's e-ter-ni-ty sur-vives.

2. Hap-py are all whose dreams re-ly
on An-cients' God who made their sky,
and earth, and seas, with all their train:
whose truth for-ev-er stands se-cure,
who frees cap-tives and feeds the poor;
we serve them too, else trust in vain.

3. Di-vine vis-ion aids ev-ery eye;
Our So-phi-a sooths the mind's cry;
O God, O Wis-dom, ev-er reigns:
Let eve-ry tongue, let eve-ry age,
in Love's ex-al-ted work en-gage;
Sing praise in ev-er-last-ing strains!

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July 29, 2006

616R O Heart of Fire

Title: "O Heart of Fire," John Henry Newman (1833), from his Hymns (New York: 1896), arr. REH (2006), LUX VERA, 10.6.10.6., John Bacchus Dykes (1870). Newman wrote of the love between "David and Jonathan" in a work of that name, with the epigraph to the poem "Thy love to me is wonderful, passing the love of women," 2 Samuel 1:26 (KJV). Newman (1801-1890) was a British clergyman and leader in the Anglo-Catholic "Oxford Movement," who eventually converted to Roman Catholicism, and became a cardinal; the "cause" of his sainthood in the Roman sense is pending (though all are free to assume that he is already a saint-- an example of faith-- in the best and broadest sense of the word). He is buried in same grave as his companion, Ambrose St. John. See also "Now there was leaning on Jesus' bosom one of his disciples, whom Jesus loved," John 13:23 (KJV); "It is Christ that died, yea rather, that is risen again, who is even at the right hand of God, who also maketh intercession for us," Romans 8:34. "For righteousness is immortal," Wisdom of Solomon 1:15.

LUX VERA (10.6.10.6.)

1. O heart of fire, mis-judged by wil-ful gain,
the flower of Jes-se's race!
What woe you had when you and Jon-a-than
last greet-ed face to face

2. One doomed to die, and on us to im-press
a heart-felt hol-i-ness;
yet all was well for you, mid cares of rule,
and crime's en-circ-ling pool.

3. A spell was o'er you, zeal-ous one, to chide,
your word-ly, roy-al pride;
with bat-tle-scene and pa-geant, soon to end
the pale calm of a friend.

4. Had the friend lived, be-fore your throne to stand,
your spir-it keen and free,
would love have then sur-vived, a slend-er band,
so dear in mem-o-ry?

5. Paul, of the com-rade reft, the bless-ing gives:
a life re-mem-bered lives;
O heart of fire, come greet us face to face,
O flower of love's long race!

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