« December 2005 | Main | May 2006 »

January 01, 2006

262R Now Thank We All Our God

Original Title: "Now Thank We All Our God," Martin Rinkart (1636), trans. Catherine Winkworth (1858), NUN DANKET, 6.7.6.7.6.6.6.6., Johann Crüger (1647), harm. Mendelssohn; New Title: "Now Thank We All Our God," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. One of the best-known hymns of the Church Universal. It appears as a two-stanza hymn in Singing the Living Tradition, at no. 32; it appears without parental metaphors in The New Century Hymnal, at no. 419. It echoes both Psalm 67, and other psalms.

NUN DANKET (6.7.6.7.6.6.6.6.)

1. Now thank we all our God, with heart and hands and voi-ces,
who won-drous things has done, in whom this world re-joi-ces;
who from our par-ents’ arms has blessed us on our way
with count-less gifts of love, and still is ours to-day.


2. O may this boun-teous God through all our life be near us,
with ev-er joy-ful hearts and bless-èd peace to cheer us;
and keep us in true grace, and guide us when per-plexed;
and free us from all ills, in this world and the next!

3. All praise and thanks to God the Fa-ther and the Mo-ther;
The one E-ter-nal God, who joins us to each oth-er;
The all-re-deem-ing Life, whom earth and heaven a-dore;
for thus it was, is now, and shall be ev-er-more.

Some congregations may wish to attempt one or more of the original German stanzas (the editors of the website would be happy to create scores for these upon request):

1. Nun dank-et al-le Gott
mit Herz-en, Mund und Händ-en,
der gro-sse Ding-e tut
an uns und al-len End-en;
Der uns von Mut-ter-leib
und Kind-es-bein-en an
un-zäh-lig viel zu gut
bis hie-her hat ge-tan.

2. Der e-wig reich-e Gott
woll uns in uns-erm Leb-en
ein Imm-er fröh-lich Herz
und ed-len Fried-en geb-en,
und uns in sein-er Gnad
er-halt-en fort und fort
und uns aus al-ler Not
er-lös-en hier und dort.

Word File
PDF File
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2005 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 01:09 AM | Comments (1)

264R Thou Gracious Power

Lyrics: Oliver Wendell Holmes (1869), L.M.
http://www.bruederbewegung.de/midi/145.mid
Tune: HERR, LENKE UNSERN SINN EMPOR, Johann Heinrich Egli (1790)
Hymns of the Spirit Two calls this ES KAM DIE GNADENVOLLE

ES KAM DIE GNADENVOLLE (L.M.)

1. Thou gra-cious Power, whose mer-cy lends
the light of home, the smile of friends,
our gath-ered flock thine arms en-fold
as thou didst keep thy folk of old.

2. Wilt thou not hear us while we raise,
in sweet ac-cord of sol-emn praise,
the voi-ces that have ming-led long
in joy-ous flow of mirth and song?

3. For all the bless-ings Life has brought,
for all its sor-rowing hours have taught,
for all we mourn, for all we keep,
the hands we clasp, the loved that sleep.

4. The noon-tide sun-shine of the past,
these brief, bright mo-ments fad-ing fast,
the stars that gild our ram-bling years,
the twi-light ray from hol-ier spheres.

5. We thank thee, Friend; O let thy grace
our nar-rowing cir-cles still em-brace,
thy mer-cy shed its heaven-ly store,
thy peace be with us ev-er-more. A-men

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2006 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 01:34 AM | Comments (0)

282R O Free Church Beyond Fixed Creeds

Original Title: "Christian, Rise, and Act Thy Creed," Francis Albert Rollo Russell (1893), NUREMBERG, 7.7.7.7., adapted from Rudolph Ahle (1664); New Title: "O Free Church Beyond Fixed Creeds," rev. REH (2006), GOTT SEI DANK, 7.7.7.7., Johann A. Freylinghausen (1704). A fellow in the (British) Royal Meterological Society, Rollo's hymns appeared in the aptly named collection Break of Day. James 2:14-15 (NRSV), "What good is it, my brothers and sisters, if you say you have faith but . . . a brother or sister is naked and lacks daily food . . . and yet you do not supply their bodily needs, what is the good of that?" Rollo was, perhaps contrary to expectation, a Unitarian (a fact which the otherwise thorough custodians at cyberhymnal.com do not mention). Despite that, it does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but does appear in The New Century Hymnal, as no. 537, under the name "Christian, Rise, and Act Your Creed," to the tune INNOCENTS.

GOTT SEI DANK (7.7.7.7.)

1. O Free Church be-yond fixed creeds;
let your prayer be in your deeds;
seek the right, per-form the true,
raise your works and life a-new.

2. Hearts a-round you charged with care;
what can help their load to bear?
What can bring in-spir-ing power,
arm their fal-tering wills this hour?

3. Let your aims be hope and joy,
and your wor-ship God’s em-ploy,
rais-ing thanks in hum-ble zeal,
learn-ing ho-ly love to feel.

4. Come, O guide di-vine, and reign;
free-ing faith as-sailed in vain,
per-fect love be-reft of fear,
born in heaven and ra-diant here.

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2006 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 01:55 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

319 Once To Every Soul and Nation

Lyrics: James Russell Lowell (1844), adapted in Hymns of the Spirit (1938); Music: TON-Y-BOTEL, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., T. J. Williams; lyrics revised by REH (2008).

1. Once to eve-ry soul and na-tion,
Comes the mo-ment to de-cide,
In the strife of truth with false-hood,
For the good or e-vil side;
Some great cause, God's new mes-siah,
Of-fering each the bloom or blight,
And the choice es-capes then from us,
'Twixt that night-fall and that light.

2. Then to side with truth is no-ble,
When we share its wretch-ed crust,
Ere that cause bring fame and prof-it,
And 'tis pros-perous to be just;
Then it is the brave one choos-es,
While the cow-ard stands a-side,
Till the mul-ti-tude make vir-tue,
Of the faith they had de-nied.

3. By the burn-ing light of mar-tyrs,
Christ, thy bleed-ing feet we track,
Toil-ing up new Cal-varies ev-er,
With the cross that turns not back;
New oc-ca-sions teach new du-ties,
Time makes an-cient good un-couth;
They must up-ward still and on-ward,
Who would keep a-breast of truth.

4. Though the cause of e-vil pros-per,
Yet 'tis truth a-lone is strong;
Though its por-tion be the scaf-fold,
And up-on the throne be wrong;
Yet that scaf-fold sways the fu-ture,
And, be-hind dim, name-less strife
Waits the Sove-reign 'midst the sha-dow,
Keep-ing watch a-bove all life.

Posted by rehurst at 06:08 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

327R All Blessings Are Scattered

Original Title: "The Lord, In His Righteousness," Katharine Huntington Annin (1923), NETHERLANDS FOLKSONG, Irregular, Traditional Melody; New Title: "All Blessings Are Scattered," rev. REH (2006), DOWN AMPNEY, 6.6.11.6.6.11., Ralph Vaughn Williams (1906). Annin was an American Congregationalist. The revised version switches the position of stanzas one and two; thus the wholly dissimiliar names. "And this is the name by which he will be called: 'The Lord is our righteousness,'" Jeremiah 23:6. Luke 4:14-18, "The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to bring good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim release to the captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to let the oppressed go free;" see also Isaiah 61:1. The hymn does not appear in either Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal.

DOWN AMPNEY (6.6.11.6.6.11.)

1. All bles-sings are scat-tered like rains from high~est heav-ens;
like dews on the fields when the grass is new mown;
peace is de-scend-ing, a~bun-dant, nev-er en-ding;
pris-oners and op-pressed are count-ed as God's own.

2. Sove-reign of right-eous-ness judg-eth all with~all jus-tice,
the moun-tains and hills by God's reign are se-cure;
peo-ples of all~na-tions through-out ge-ne-ra-tions
shall sing praise as long as the Sun shall en-dure.

3. From sea to sea shall be Love's true do-min-ion spread,
from the ends of the Earth to where riv-ers run;
the isles of deep~o-ceans shall of-fer de-vo-tions,
Ru-lers shall bow down, and all lands pray as one.

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2006 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 06:28 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

328R O Pure Reformers, Not in Vain

Original Title: "O Pure Reformers, Not in Vain," John Greenleaf Whittier (1843), COVENTRY, C.M., Samuel Howard (c. 1762); New Title: same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), ST. ANNE, C.M., William Croft (1708). Whittier was an 19th Century American Quaker poet, and a well-known advocate of the abolition of slavery in the United States. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal. Though the hymn predates both his ministry and the holiday, many may find it appropriate to commemorate the life of Martin Luther King, Jr. The lyrics speak most directly to Ephesians 4:11-16, which tells of prophets and teachers sent to "equip the saints" so that we might not be like children "tossed here and there by waves, and carried about by every wind of doctrine." Also notable are echoes of the conflict between "lies" and "truth" in the gospel of John, see John 17:17, John 8:44.

ST. ANNE (C.M.)

1. O pure re-form-ers! not in vain,
your trust in hu-man-kind;
the good which blood-shed could not gain,
your peace-ful zeal shall find.


2. The truths you urge are borne a-broad
by eve-ry wind and tide;
the voice of na-ture and of God
speaks out up-on your side.

3. The wea-pons which your hands have found
are those which heaven has wrought,
light, truth, and love; your bat-tle ground,
the free, broad field of thought.

4. O may no self-ish pur-pose break
the beau-ty of your call,
no lie from throne or al-tar shake
your stead-y faith in all.


5. Press on! and if we may not share
the glo-ry of your cry,
we'll ask at least, in earn-est prayer,
that your dreams may not die. A-men.

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2005 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 06:28 PM | Comments (0)

331R Onward Christian Soldiers

It may surprise some to learn that Hymns of the Spirit Two (1937) included "Onward Christian Soldiers" in addition to "Forward Through the Ages" for use by Unitarians and Universalists, given its absence from later denominational hymnals published by the Unitarian Universalist Association, and indeed given its absence from hymnals lately published other moderate and liberal Christian groups. Below are lyrics that take on a nearly impossible (and mostly thankless) task, seeking to be true to the original's "church militant" imagery while being useful for worship in the liberal church. Although the original lyrics were neutral, in content, on the efficacy of war, the images in the minds of some have not seemed neutral (many hear "off to war" rather than "as to war" in the hymn's first line, for example). The revised lyrics have sought to make clearer this neutrality, and make a bit more explicit the spiritual and moral goals of the liberal church.

ST. GERTRUDE, 6.5.6.5.6.5.6.5.6.5.6.5

1. On-ward, Christ-ian sol-diers, march-ing as to war,
With the crown of jus-tice go-ing on be-fore.
Christ, the roy-al rab-bi, leads a-gainst the flow;
For-ward through dis-trac-tion see love's mes-sage go!
On-ward, faith-ful sol-diers, on-ward, we im-plore,
With the crown of jus-tice go-ing on be-fore.

2. Like a swift up-ris-ing moves the church of God;
Kin-dred, we are tread-ing where the saints have trod.
May we be u-nit-ed, all one bo-dy be,
One in hope and free-dom, one in char-i-ty.
On-ward, faith-ful sold-iers; whose hearts on high soar,
With the crown of jus-tice, go-ing on be-fore.

3. Rich re-gimes may per-ish, thrones may rise and wane,
But the church of free-dom con-stant will re-main.
Tri-als shall not ev-er 'gainst that church pre-vail;
We have Christ’s own pro-mise, and that shall not fail.
On-ward, faith-ful sol-diers, dream-ing war no more,
With the crown of jus-tice, go-ing on be-fore.

4. On-ward then, all peo-ples, join our hap-py throng,
Blend with ours your voi-ces in this good-will song.
Glo-ry, laud and hon-or to your God do bring,
This through count-less a-ges, earth and an-gels sing:
On-ward, on-ward, sol-diers, seek peace ev-er-more,
With the crown of jus-tice, go-ing on be-fore!

Posted by rehurst at 10:28 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

342R Turn Back

Original Title: "Turn Back, O Man, Forswear Thy Foolish Ways," Clifford Bax, OLD 124TH (10.10.10.10), Genevan Psalter (1551); New Title: "Turn Back," rev. REH (2008), same hymn tune. Ezekiel 18:32 (NRSV), "For I have no pleasure in the death of anyone, says the Lord God. Turn, then, and live;" 2 Samuel 1:7-8, "Hannah wept and would not eat. Her husband Elkanah said to her, “Hannah, why do you weep? Why do you not eat? Why is your heart sad?" 2 Samuel 7:10, "And I will appoint a place for my people Israel and will plant them, so that they may live in their own place, and be disturbed no more; and evildoers shall afflict them no more;" 2 Samuel 18:7-8, "The men of Israel were defeated there by the servants of David, and the slaughter there was great on that day, twenty thousand men. The battle spread over the face of all the country;" 2 Samuel 23:3-4, "One who rules over people justly, ruling in the fear of God, is like the light of morning." See also Matthew 6:9-13; Luke 11:2-4. The hymn appears in Singing the Living tradition as hymn no. 120 also as "Turn Back;" it differs from the words here inasmuch as the SLT version assigns earth definitively to the "neutral" pronoun "it," rather than leaving earth's gender ambiguous as here. The words below likewise do not make use of the adjective "fair" in describing the earth, unlike in SLT and in the original version.

OLD 124TH (10.10.10.10)

1. Turn back, turn back, for-swear thy fool-ish ways;
Old now is earth, and none may count the days;
Yet thou, earth's child, whose head is crowned with flame;
Still wilt not hear thine in-ner God pro-claim,
"Turn back, turn back, for-swear thy fool-ish ways."

2. Earth might be free; all peo-ple glad and wise;
Age after age our tra-gic em-pires rise;
Built while we dream, and in that dream-ing weep:
Would we but wake from out our haunt-ed sleep;
Earth might be free; all peo-ple glad and wise.

3. Earth shall be free, and all earth's peo-ple one:
Nor till that hour shall God's whole will be done.
Now, even now, once more from earth to sky;
Peals forth in joy the old un-daunt-ed cry:
"Earth shall be free and all earth's folk be one!"

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2008 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 11:28 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

January 02, 2006

349R Eternal Ruler of the Ceaseless (Round)

Original Title: "Eternal Ruler, of the Ceaseless Round," John White Chadwick (1864), first tune, SONG 1, 10.10.10.10.10.10., (alternative FFIGYSBREN), Orlando Gibbons (1623), second tune STOCKPORT (YORKSHIRE), 10.10.10.10.10.10., John Wainwright (1750); New Title: "Eternal Ruler, of the Ceaseless (Round)," rev. REH (2006), STOCKPORT (YORKSHIRE), 10.10.10.10.10.10. Chadwick was a 19th Century American Unitarian minister, who was graduated from Harvard Divinity in 1864, and ordained at Second Unitarian in Brooklyn; he wrote for both the AUA publication The Christian Register and Harper's. The New Century Hymnal and Singing the Living Tradition do not contain the hymn. "The glory which thou gavest me I have given them; that they may be one, even as we are one," John 17:22 (KJV). Ephesians 2:17-19 (NRSV), "So [Christ] came and proclaimed peace to you who were far off and peace to those who were near; through him both of us have access in one Spirit to the Father. So then you are no longer strangers and aliens, but you are citizens with the saints and also members of the household of God." "Then [Jesus] got into the boat with them and the wind ceased," Mark 6:51," compare "let wind or weather be" in the last verse. 2 Corinthians 5:18, "All this is from God, who reconciled us to himself through Christ, and has given us the ministry of reconciliation."

STOCKPORT (YORKSHIRE)(10.10.10.10.10.10.)

1. E-ter-nal Ru-ler of the cease-less round
of circ-ling pla-nets sing-ing on their way,
Guide of the na-tions from the night pro-found
in-to the glo-ry of the per-fect day;
rule in our hearts, that we may ev-er be
guid-ed and held by you and loved free-ly.


2. We are all yours, the chil-dren of your love,
the kind-red of your long-ex-pect-ed child;
des-cend, O ho-ly spir-it, like a dove
in-to our hearts, that we be re-con-ciled;
as one with you, to whom we ev-er tend;
as one with your be-lov-èd, our true friend.

3. We would be one in ha-tred of all wrong,
one in our love of all things sweet with care;
one with the joy that e'er breaks in-to song,
one with the grief that tremb-les in-to prayer,
one in the power that makes your chil-dren free
to fol-low truth, ev-er in li-ber-ty.

4. O clothe us with your heaven-ly ar-mor too,
your trus-ty shield, your sword of ho-ly love;
our in-spir-a-tion be your known word's due;
we ask no vic-tor-ies not from a-bove;
give or with-hold, let wind or wea-ther be,
e-nough to know that we do serve free-ly.

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2006 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 06:28 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

January 03, 2006

380R God of the Ages, Known of Old

Old Title: "God of our Fathers, Known of Old," Rudyard Kipling (1897), FOLKINGHAM, 8.8.8.8.8.8., from the Supplement to the New Version, Nahum Tate & Nicholas Brady (1700), alt. MELITA, 8.8.8.8.8.8., John Bacchus Dykes (1861); New Title: "God of the Ages, Know of Old," rev. REH (2006), FOLKINGHAM, 8.8.8.8.8.8. The words were originally written as the poem "Recessional," and published in the London Times during Queen Victoria’s Jubilee celebration. They were also sung at Kipling’s funeral, under the title "God of our Fathers, Known of Old." They have been "modernized" and made "American" here, with the funeral of former President Gerald Ford in mind (though many other uses suggest themselves).

FOLKINGHAM (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. God of the a-ges, known of old;
You of our far-flung bat-tle line,
be-neath whose aw-ful hand we hold
do-mi-nion ov-er palm and pine:
God of our fa-thers, be here yet,
lest we for-get, lest we for-get!

2. The tu-mult and the shout-ing dies;
The cap-tains and news crews de-part:
Still stands an an-cient sa-cri-fice,
a hum-ble and a con-trite heart.
God of our moth-ers, be here yet,
lest we for-get, lest we for-get!

3. Far called, the na-vies melt a-way,
on dune and head-land sinks the fire:
Lo, all the pomp of yes-ter-day
is one with Ni-ne-veh and Tyre!
Judge of the na-tions, spare us yet,
lest we for-get, lest we for-get!

4. If, drunk with sight of power, we loose
wild tongues that have not you in awe,
such boast-ings as the pride-ful use,
or ones who have ig-nored your law:
O God of hosts, be with us yet,
lest we for-get, lest we for-get!

5. Un-think-ing hearts that put their trust
in blink-ing screen and ir-on shard,
all val-iant dust that builds on dust,
and guard-ing, calls not you to guard,
for fran-tic boast and fool-ish word:
Have mer-cy on all peo-ple, God!

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2006 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 06:28 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

January 04, 2006

413R In Christ There Is No East or West

Title: "In Christ, There Is No East or West," Words: John Oxenham (1908), rev. REH (2006); Music: McKEE (C.M.D.), African-American spiritual, arranged by Harry T. Burleigh. "Then [Jesus] took a little child and put it among them; and taking it in his arms, he said to them, Whoever welcomes one such child in my name welcomes me." Mark 9:36-37.

McKEE (C.M.D.)

1. In Christ there is no East or West,
In Christ no South or North;
But one great com-mon-wealth of love
through-out the whole-wide earth.
In Christ shall true hearts eve-ry-where
their true com-mun-ion find;
Christ's ser-vice is the gol-den cord,
close bind-ing hu-man-kind.


2. Join hands, then, mem-bers of all faiths,
what-ever your na~tion may be!
Who serves the Sove-reign as a child
is sure-ly kin to me.
In Christ now meet both East and West,
In Christ meet North and South;
All faith-ful souls are one in love,
through-out the whole-wide earth.

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2005 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."


Posted by rehurst at 02:41 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

431R All Souls, O God, Are Thine

Original Title: "All Souls, O Lord, Are Thine," Epes Sargent (1813-1880), LANGRAN, 10.10.10.10., James Langran (1863); New Title, "All Souls, O God, Are Thine," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Sargent was a Universalist minister in the United States. "[Christ] has made known to us the mystery of his will, according to his good pleasure that he set forth in Christ, as a plan for the fullness of time, to gather up all things in him, things in heaven and things on earth," Ephesians 1:9-10. "But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels, for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honor; that he, by the grace of God, should taste death for every man," Hebrews 2:9. "And he is the propitiation for our sins; and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world," 1 John 2:2. "The Savior of all, especially those who believe." 1 Timothy 4:10. "God [is] All in All," 1 Corinthians 15:28. The hymn does not appear in The New Century Hymnal nor (astonishingly) in Singing the Living Tradition.

LANGRAN (10.10.10.10.)

1. All souls, O God, are thine, as-sur-ance blest!
Thine, not our own to rob of help di-vine;
not ours to doom by an-y hu-man test,
but thine, O gra-cious God, and on-ly thine.

2. Thine, by thy va-rious dis-ci-plines, to lead
to heights where heaven-ly truths im-mort-al shine,
truths none e-ter-nal-ly shall fail to heed;
for all, O God, are thine, for-ev-er thine.

3. For-give the thought, that ev-er-last-ing ill
to a-ny can be part of thy de-sign;
fi-nite, im-per-fect, er-ring, guil-ty-- still
all souls, great God, are thine-- and mer-cy thine. A-men.

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2006 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 11:47 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

447R O God, Unseen

Original Title: "O God, Unseen But Ever Near," Edward Olser, Samuel Longfellow (1864), GRÄFENBURG, C.M., Johann Crüger (1653); New Title: "O God, Unseen," alt. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Exodus:16:3-4,"'If only we had died by the hand of the Lord in the land of Egypt, when we sat by the fleshpots and ate our fill of bread; for you have brought us out into this wilderness' . . . Then the Lord said to Moses, 'I am going to rain bread from heaven for you.'" "The invisible God," Colossians 1:15. John 6:48, 51, "I am the bread of life." "I cannot perceive [God]," Job 23:8. The hymn does not appear in either The New Century Hymnal nor Singing the Living Tradition.

GRÄFENBURG (C.M.)

1. O God, un-seen but ev-er near,
our bless-ed rest are thou;
and we, in love that has no fear,
take re-fuge with thee now.

2. All soiled with dust our pil-grim feet
and wea-ry with the way;
we seek thy shel-ter from the heat
and burd-en of the day.

3. O wel-come in the wil-der-ness
the sha-dow of thy love;
the stream that springs our thirst to bless,
the man-na from a-bove!

4. A-while be-side the fount we stay
and eat this bread of thine,
then go re-joic-ing on our way,
re-newed with strength di-vine.

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2006 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 11:48 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

470R God, Dismiss Us With Your Blessing

Original Title: Lord, Dismiss Us With Thy Blessing; New Title: God, Dismiss Us With Your Blessing; ascribed to John Fawcett, 1773; alt. REH, 2008; SICILIAN MARINERS, 8.7.8.7.4.4.7. (8.7.8.7.8.7), Traditional, Merrick's Psalms, 1794.

SICILIAN MARINERS (8.7.8.7.4.4.7.)

1. God, dis-miss us with your bless-ing;
Hope and com-fort from above:
Let us each, your peace pos-sess-ing,
Tri-umph in re-deem-ing love.
O re-fresh us, O re-fresh us,
Trav'-ling through the wil-der-ness.

2. Thanks we give and a-dor-a-tion
For your gos-pel's joy-ful sound;
May the fruits of your sal-va-tion
In our hearts and lives a-bound.
May your pres-ence, may your pres-ence,
With us ev-er-more be found.

PDF File


Posted by rehurst at 11:48 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

492R Break Forth, O Beauteous Heavenly Light

Break Forth, O Beauteous Heavenly Light, Johann Rist, 1641, Trans. John Troutbeck (verse 1); verse 2 appears in Voices United (United Church of Canada hymnal), Trans. Trozer Rusell, ca. 1851; ERMUNTRE DICH (Break Forth O Beauteous Heavenly Light), 8.7.8.7.8.8.7.7., Johann Schop, 1641, as harmonized by J.S. Bach in the Christmas Oratorio, 1734.

ERMUNTRE DICH (8.7.8.7.8.8.7.7.)

1. Break forth, O beau-teous heav'n-ly light,
And ush-er in the morn-ing;
Ye shep-herds, shrink not with af-fright,
But hear the an-gel's warn-ing.
This child, now weak in in-fan-cy,
Our con-fi-dence and joy shall be,
All self-ish thoughts e'er break-ing,
Our peace e-ter-nal mak-ing.

2. All bless-ing, thanks, and praise to thee,
O light of heav'n, be giv-en:
Thou hast our true friend deigned to be
Our fears in sun-der riv-en.
O grant us through our day of grace
With con-stant praise to seek thy face;
Grant us ere long in glo-ry
With prais-es to a-dore thee.

German Original:

Brich an, o schönes Morgenlicht,
Und laß den Himmel tagen!
Du Hirtenvolk, erschrecke nicht
Weil dir die Engel sagen,
Daß dieses schwache Knäbelein
Soll unser Trost und Freude sein.
Dazu den Satin zwingen
Und letzlich Frieden bringen.

PDF File
PDF File/Keyboard-Friendly Score


Posted by rehurst at 11:49 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

496R-502S All People That On Earth Do Dwell / Doxology

Old and New Titles: "All People That On Earth Do Dwell," William Kethe (1561), rev. REH (2006), OLD HUNDREDTH (L.M.), attributed to Louis Bourgeois, melody from Genevan Psalter (1551). OLD HUNDREDTH is commonly used for doxologies, and is so used in Hymns of the Spirit Two at nos. 496-502. Equivalents are found in Singing the Living Tradition at nos. 365, 370-381, and in The New Century Hymnal at nos. 7, 27, 776-782. While "All People That On Earth Do Dwell" appears in its old form (in B-flat) in Hymns of the Spirit Two, it appears in its modern form here, in F-sharp (the tune found in no. 497 in Hymns of the Spirit Two). Psalm 100, on which no. 496R is based, is the revised lectionary psalm for Proper 6A/Ordinary 11A/Pentecost 4A, Thanksgiving C and Christ the King/Reign of Christ A. Psalm 117 (see 498R below) is used as a lectionary psalm only by Roman Catholics, for Proper 16C/Ordinary 21C. The lyrics below, through no. 502S, may be used productively with many tunes set in L.M. (8.8.8.8.) meter.

OLD HUNDREDTH (Modern Form) (L.M.)


496R William Kethe (1561), rev. REH (2006)

1. All peo-ple that on earth do dwell,
Sing now a-loud with cheer-ful voice;
The Ho-ly One is God in-deed;
With-out our aid who did us make.

2. Serve Life with mirth, O prais-es tell,
Come ye be-fore all and re-joice.
All are God's folk, who doth us feed,
And for whose sheep Love doth us take.

3. O en-ter Wis-dom's gates with praise,
Ap-proach with joy God's courts un-to;
Praise, laud and bless the Name al-ways,
For it is seem-ly so to do.

4. For why? Our Sove-reign God is good,
Whose mer-cy is for-ev-er sure;
Whose truth at all times firm-ly stood,
And shall from age to age en-dure. A-men.

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File


496S Théodore de Bèze (1519-1605) et d’autres, arranged by REH (2006)

1. Vous, qui sur la terre ha-bi-tez,
Chan-tez à hau-te voix, chan-tez;
Et, de con-cert a-vec les cieux,
Cé-lé-brez son nom glo-ri-eux.

2. C’est un Dieu rem-pli de bon-té,
D’une é-ter-nel-le vér-i-té,
Tou-jours pro-pice à nos sou-haits,
Et sa grâce du-re à ja-mais. A-men.


497R Nahum Tate and Nicholas Brady, rev. REH (2006)

Be thou, O God, ex-alt-ed high;
And as thy glo-ry fills the sky,
So let it be on earth dis-played,
Till Love is here, as there, obeyed. A-men.


498R Isaac Watts (1718), rev. REH (2006), Paraphrase of Psalm 117

1. From all that dwells be-low the skies
Let the Cre-a-tor's praise a-raise;
Let the Re-deem-er's name be sung
Through eve-ry land, by eve-ry tongue.

2. E-ter-nal are thy mer-cies, Love;
E-ter-nal Truth at-tends a-bove;
Thy praise shall sound from shore to shore;
Till suns shall rise and set no more.

3. Your lof-ty themes, all peo-ples, bring,
In songs of praise di-vine-ly sing;
The great sal-va-tion loud proclaim,
And praise now the larg-er hope's name.

4. In eve-ry land be-gin the song;
To every land the strains be-long;
In cheer-ful sounds all voi-ces raise,
And fill the world with loud-est praise. A-men


499R Thomas Ken, alt., see, e.g., "Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above," James 1:17

Praise God, from whom all bless-ings flow;
Praise God, all crea-tures here below;
Praise God, above, ye heaven-ly throng;
Praise God, Cre-a-tor, in your song. A-men.


499S Based on Thomas Ken, rev. REH (no. 479 de El Himnario)

Can-tad al san-to y~u-no Dios,
sus a-la-ban-zas en-ton-dad;
su~e-ter-na hon-ra pro-cla-mad
con voz de~a-mor y gra-ti-tud. A-mén.


499T Anónimo, rev. REH (no. 476 de El Himnario)

A la di-vi-na U-ni-dad,
to-das y to-dos a-la-bad.
Con a-le-grí-a~y gra-ti-tud
su~a-mor y gra-cia ce-le-brad. A-mén.


499U Clément Marot (1543)

Ren-dez à Dieu lou-ange et gloire,
Car il est be-nign et cle-ment,
Qui plus est sa bon-té no-toire,
Du-re per-pé-tu-el-le-ment. A-men.


500R Anonymous (or Charles H. Lyttle per Singing the Living Tradition, no. 365)

Praise God, the Love we all may share;
Praise God, the Beau-ty eve-ry-where;
Praise God, the Hope of Good to be;
Praise God, the Truth that makes us free. A-men.


501R Gerhard Tersteegen (1729), translated by John Wesley (1739), rev. REH (2007)

1. Lo, God is here! let us a-dore,
And joy-ful-ly make this Love's place;
Let all with-in us feel Truth's power;
Let all with-in us seek Life's grace.

2. Lo, God is here! O, day and night,
U-ni-ted choirs of an-gels sing;
To Hope, en-throned a-bove all height,
Heaven's host their no-blest prais-es bring.

3. O Fount of be-ing! may our praise
Thy courts with grate-ful in-cense fill;
Still may we stand be-fore thy face,
Still hear and do thy sove-reign will. A-men.



501S Nils Frykman (1883), translated from Swedish to English by Andrew L. Skoog (1920), alt. REH (2007)

1. Min fram-tids-dat är ljus och lång,
Den räc-ker bor-tom ti-dens tvång,
Där Gud och Lam-met säll jag ser
Och in-gen nöd skal va-ra mer.


2. A fu-ture of but grace sub-lime,
Be-yond the realms of space and time,
Where the re-deem-er I shall see,
And sor-row ne-ver-more shall be. A-men.


502R Arranged by C. W. Reese (1935)

From all that dwell be-low the skies;
Let faith and hope with love a-rise;
Let beau-ty, truth and good be sung
Through eve-ry land, by eve-ry tongue. Amen.


502S Based on Isaac Watts

De to-dos ba-jos el gran sol
sur-ja~es-per-an-za, fe, a-mor
ver-dad, y~be-lle-za can-tan-do,
de ca-da tierr-a, ca-da voz. A-mén.


All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2007 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 11:50 PM | Comments (3) | TrackBack

517R Dominus Vobiscum

Original Title: "The Lord Be With You," Traditional, rev. REH (2006). The downloadable music files contain only the sung responses. "The Eternal," despite its latter-day sound, in fact can be traced to John Calvin, as a translation of the Hebrew Yahweh, "I am that I am," or "I am that I will be," the veritable God of Being. In Hymns of the Spirit Two, the "spoken" part is designated as belonging to the "Minister," and the sung part as belonging to the "Choir." Versicles are used in many churches, and have been so used since the earliest times (extended versions may be found in the Roman mass, the Episcopal and King's Chapel Book of Common Prayer as well as the old Universalist Prayerbook, the Gloria Patri). Typically it is the whole congregation that responds, sometimes in spoken form, sometimes in sung form. Many otherwise non-liturgical churches in various traditions employ such a liturgical touch before pastoral or congregational prayers and petitions, placing the "Amen" after such prayers (often in addition to a time of silent reflection). "Wash me throughly from mine iniquity, and cleanse me from my sin," Psalm 51:2.

Spoken:
The Lord be with you
or: The Eternal be with you
or: God be with you.

Sung Response:
or: And with thy spir-it
or: And with your spir-it.

Spoken:
Let us pray. O Lord, show thy mercy upon us.
or: Let us pray. O Eternal, show your mercy upon us.
or: Let us pray. O God, show your mercy upon us.

Sung Response:
And grant us thy salvation.
or: And grant us your sal-va-tion.
or: And grant us your for-give-ness.

Spoken:
O God, make clean our hearts within us.
or May Love make clean our hearts within us.

Sung Response:
And take not thy ho-ly spir-it from us.
or And take not your ho-ly spir-it from us.
or And may the spir-it of life dwell with us.

If desired, the following sentences may be omitted.

Spoken:
O Thou, in whom alone our hearts find rest,
or O You, in whom alone our hearts find rest,
or O You, in whom our hearts find rest,

Sung Response:
Grant us thy peace. A-men.
or: Grant us your peace. A-men.
or: Grant us your peace. Be blessed.

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2006 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 11:53 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

January 05, 2006

531S Psalm 67: Bless Us, O God

Original Title: "God Be Merciful Unto Me," Anonymous, first setting, Anonymous, second setting, William Croft; New Title: "Psalm 67: Bless Us, O God," Christine Robinson (2006), arranged by REH (2006), first setting, Anonymous. Christine Robinson is a minister at First Unitarian Church in Albuquerque, New Mexico; her adaptation of the psalms has been part of her daily spiritual exercises since 2003. During a sabbatical from parish ministry, she began to write these psalms on a blog entitled Psalms for a New World, an adaptation using "inclusive language and through modern lenses of ecological awareness, Taoist sensibilites, and post-modern theology." Though the style of these adaptations would generally not be suited for metrical psalms or "four-square" hymn paraphrases, Hymns of the Spirit Two does contain a few Anglican-style plainchants that do not require rigorous rhyming or metrical schemes. This is one of those selections, and the Reverend Robinson's work has been adopted for inclusion here. She has graciously granted permission for same. The normal copyright restrictions on local and congregational use apply as noted below. Psalm 67 is the revised common lectionary psalm for Proper 15A/Ordinary 20A/Pentecost 13A and Easter 6C.

PSALM 67 (Chant)

1. Bless us, O God; whisper~in~our hearts and light our times.
2. Help~us~to~understand~your~love and your law; and~bring~them~to bear on the world’s ills.
3. Let~all~the~people~of~the earth praise you with~all their di-verse voi-ces.
4. Let~them~call~out~the~ten thou-sand names; let~all~nations~praise~you~with the best of their ways.
5. Let~the~peoples~of~the~earth bless the earth and~heal~earth~together;~let~us~all~enjoy each oth-er’s wis-dom.
6. Bless~us,~O~God,~with~your~presence in our hearts; and~in~the~soul~of our na-tion. A-men.

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2006 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 01:52 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

546R Faith of the Martyrs, Living Still

Original Title: "Faith of Our Fathers, Living Still," adapted from Frederick William Faber (1849), ST. CATHERINE, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Henri Frederick Hemi (1865); New Title: "Faith of the Martyrs," rev. REH (2006), same hyme tune. Though the son of an Anglican cleric, Faber was a Roman Catholic priest. The hymn speaks of the persecution of Catholics in Britain; the original spoke of "Mary's prayers" that would set Britain free. Its position in Hymns of the Spirit Two (1937) is of note; as no. 546, it is the first hymn in the section marked "SUPPLEMENT." Many of these hymns were reckoned to be tunes of lesser quality, popular with the more rural Universalists. Oddly, however, "Faith of Our Fathers" does not appear in the prior hymnal published by the Universalists, Hymns of the Church (Boston: 1917) (though Reginald Heber's "Forth From the Dark and Stormy Sky" appears therein to ST. CATHERINE, a tune which does not appear anywhere other than at no. 546 in Hymns of the Spirit Two). It may be that its Catholic pedigree (Universalists were generally less anti-Catholic than Unitarians and other Protestants of the day) and the theme of persecution made the hymn appropriate for the "Universalist" section. In New England, the Unitarians were originally part of the "Standing Order" of (state-supported) Puritan/Congregational churches until in some cases the middle part of the 19th century; such standing did not apply to the (relatively speaking, persecuted) Universalists. The lyrics echo Hebrews 11:1-2 (NRSV), "Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen. Indeed, by faith our ancestors received approval." They also obliquely refer to the story in Mark regarding John the Baptist, "she rushed back to the king and requested, 'I want you to give me at once the head of John the Baptist on a platter,' . . . Immediately the king sent a soldier of the guard with orders to bring John's head. He went and beheaded him in the prison, brought his head on a platter," Mark 6:25-28. One too is reminded of Job in the Hebrew Bible, "But [God] knows the way that I take; when he has tested me, I shall come out like gold," Job 23:10. "Then the Lord answered Job out of the whirlwind: . . . Gird up your loins . . . I will question you, and you shall declare to me," Job 38:1-3. "Then Job answered the Lord: 'I know that you can do all things, and that no purpose of yours can be thwarted,'" Job 42:1-2. The hymn's lyrical change to "Faith of Our Mothers" is more than fanciful political correction; while the Congregational Church claims the first woman ordained to Christain ministry in the United States, the Universalists claim the first woman approved to the ministry at the denominational level, in the person of Olympia Brown. In the Midwest, female preaching "circuit riders" (including the celebrated Iowa Sisterhood) famously spread the liberating gospel of the faith. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but does appear as "Faith of the Martyrs, Living Still," as no. 381, in The New Century Hymnal.

ST. CATHERINE (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. Faith of the mar-tyrs, liv-ing still,
in spite of dun-geon, fire and sword;
O how our hearts beat high with joy
when-e'er we hear that glo-rious word!
Faith of the mar-tyrs, ho-ly faith!
We will be true through life and death.

2. Faith of our fa-thers, we will strive
to dwell with all souls peace-ful-ly;
and through the truth that comes from God,
we all shall then be tru-ly free.
Faith of our fa-thers, ho-ly faith!
We will be true through life and death.

3. Our for-bears chained in pri-son dim
were still in heart and con-science free;
and blessed would be our own lives' fate
if we, like them, should live for thee.
Faith of our for-bears, ho-ly faith!
We will be true through life and death.

4. Faith of our mo-thers, we will love
both friend and foe in all our strife;
and preach thee, too, as love knows how
by kind-ly words and vir-tuous life.
Faith of our mo-thers, ho-ly faith!
We will be true through life and death.

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2006 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 04:28 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

January 07, 2006

556R There's a Wideness in God's Mercy

Original Title: "Souls of Men! Why Will Ye Scatter," Frederick William Faber (1854), WESTON, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., John E. Roe; New Title: "There's a Wideness in God's Mercy," rev. REH (2007), ST. MABYN, 8.7.8.7. D, Arthur Henry Brown (1889). "Or those eighteen who were killed when the tower of Siloam fell on them—do you think that they were worse offenders than all the others living in Jerusalem? No, I tell you," Luke 13:4-5a (NRSV). "His mercy is for those who fear him from generation to generation,” Luke 1:50. Zechariah 13:17 (ESV), "Strike the shepherd, and the sheep will be scattered." Isaiah 60:20 (KJV), "Thy sun shall no more go down; neither shall thy moon withdraw itself: for the LORD shall be thine everlasting light, and the days of thy mourning shall be ended." Luke 15:4-5, "What man of you, having an hundred sheep, if he lose one of them, doth not leave the ninety and nine in the wilderness, and go after that which is lost, until he find it? And when he hath found it, he layeth it on his shoulders, rejoicing." Psalm 119:96 (ESV), "I have seen a limit to all perfection, but your commandment is exceedingly broad." 1John 5:3 (NRSV), "For the love of God is this, that we obey his commandments. And his commandments are not burdensome;" see also Romans 7:12. The hymn appears as no. 213 with three stanzas (from stanza one below, and the first half of stanza three) to the tune CHARLESTON, 8.7.8.7., in Singing the Living Tradition. It also appears as no. 23 in The New Century Hymnal to the tune IN BABILONE, 8.7.8.7.D, with two stanzas, with HOLY MANNA as an alternate.

ST. MABYN (8.7.8.7. D)

1. There's a wide-ness in God's mer-cy,
like the wide-ness of the sea;
there's a kind-ness in true jus-tice,
which is more than lib-er-ty.
For the love di-vine is broad-er
than the mea-sure of our mind;
and the heart of the E-ter-nal
is most won-der-ful-ly kind.

2. Souls on earth, why do you scat-ter
like a crowd of count-ing sheep?
Lone-some hearts, why do you wan-der
from a love so true and deep?
Do you know a kind-er shep-herd
half as gen-tle, half as sweet,
as the Sove-reign who would have us
turn to heav-en's mer-cy seat?

3. O we make love's law too nar-row
by false li-mits of our own;
and we mag-ni-fy God's strict-ness
with a zeal not heav-en's own.
If our lives were but more sim-ple,
we should live them in God's love;
then our lives would all be sun-shine
with a sweet-ness from a-bove.

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2007 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 04:28 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

January 08, 2006

600R Pues Si Vivimos

Title: "Pues Si Vivimos," Mexican folk hymn, anonymous translation, "In All Our Living," PUES SI VIVIMOS, Irregular, traditional hymn; The hymn appears in The New Century Hymnal along with other, copyrighted stanzas as no. 499; likewise is the case with Mil voces para celebrar (in which still other stanzas appear) where it is included as no. 337. It does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in Hymns of the Spirit Two. The hymn was transcribed by Gerturde Suppe when she heard it sung by two church women from Mexico. The lyrics are based on Romans 14:8, but have other resonances as well.

PUES SI VIVIMOS (Irr.)

1. Pues si vi-vi-mos, pa-ra Dios vi-vi~mos
y si mo-ri-mos, pa-ra Dios mo-ri~mos.
Se-a que vi-va-mos, o que mu-ra~mos,
so-mos del buen Dios, so-mos del buen Dios.

2. In all our liv-ing, we be-long to God;
and in our dy-ing, we are still with God;
So,_ wheth-er liv-ing, or wheth-er dy~ing,
we be-long to God; we be-long to God.

Word Score
PDF Score

Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2005 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 03:56 AM | Comments (4)

January 10, 2006

601R O Love, My Inmost Heart

Title: "O Love, My Inmost Heart," The Psalter (1912), rev. REH (2005), GUTERHIRT, C.M., Michael Lonnecke (2005). Though not included in Hymns of the Spirit Two, this minor recasting of Psalm 139 from The Psalter is included here, to a hymn tune written by Michael Lonnecke for the psalm. Lonneke was the found­ing pre­si­dent of the Lou­doun, Vir­gin­ia, Sym­pho­ny, and serves as or­gan­ist for the Ang­li­can Church of the Good Shep­herd and for Trin­i­ty United Meth­od­ist Church, both in Par­is, Vir­gin­ia, near Washington. He has released the tune into the public domain.

GUTERHIRT (C.M.)

1. O Love, my in-most heart and thought
thy search-ing eye doth see;
Wher-e'er I rest, wher-e'er I go,
my ways are known to thee.

2. Each spok-en word, each si-lent thought,
thou, God, dost un-der-stand;
Be-fore me and be-hind art thou,
sus-tain-ing by thy hand.


3. If I the wings of morn-ing take
to some re-mot-est land,
still I shall be up-held by thee
and guid-ed by thy hand.

4. From thee, O God, I can-not hide
though night-time cov-er me;
The even-ing and the light of day
are both a-like to thee.

5. Search me, O Truth, and know my heart,
try me, my thoughts to know;
O lead me, if aim-less I stray,
in paths of life to go.

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

Posted by rehurst at 01:22 AM | Comments (0)

January 14, 2006

602R O Light of Every Nation

Title: "O Light of Every Nation," Johann Franck (1674), originally "Herr Jesu, Licht der Heiden," translated from German to English by Catherine Winkworth (1863), rev. REH (2006), VALET WILL ICH DIR GEBEN, 7.6.7.6 D, Melchior Teschner (1613). The Song of Simeon, or the Nunc Dimittis, is often associated with Candlemas (and typically used as a closing hymn), and is found at Luke 2:29-32. The following hymn, Catherine Winkworth's translation from the German, entitled "O Light of Every Nation," which echoes this passage.

VALET WILL ICH DIR GEBEN (7.6.7.6. D)

1. O light of eve-ry na-tion, re-deem-er from a-bove,
drawn by the spir-it’s lead-ing, we come with joy and love
into your ho-ly tem-ple and wait with earn-est mind
as Sim-eon once had wait-ed on the Sove-reign to find.

2. O, God, your seek-ers meet you in eve-ry ho-ly place
where your true words have pro-mis-ed that we should find your grace.
To-day you still do grant us who ga-ther 'round you here
in arms of faith to bear you as did that agèd seer.


3. O be our joy and bright-ness, our cheer in loss and pain,
our sun in deep-est ter-ror, the glo-ry of your reign,
a star for sink-ing spir-its, a bea-con in dis-tress,
phy-si-cian, friend in sick-ness, in death our hap-pi-ness.

4. Let us, O God, be faith-ful like Sim-eon to the end,
So that this prayer ex-ul-tant may from our hearts as-cend:
"O God, now let your ser-vant de-part in peace, I pray,
since I have seen th'A-noint-ed here on this ve-ry day."


Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2005 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 02:53 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

January 15, 2006

603R Rock of Ages / Roca de la eternidad

REDHEAD (PETRA)(7.7.7.7.7.7.)

1. Rock of A-ges, cleft for me,
let me hide, a shel-ter be;
O the wa-ters midst the flood,
from the wound-ed sky did flow;
May we find a last-ing cure;
Save from wrath and make all pure.

2. Noth-ing in my hand I bring,
simp-ly to your love I cling;
Nak-ed, come to you for dress;
Help-less, look to you for grace;
Foul, I to your foun-tain fly;
Wash me, Pure Love, now my cry.

3. While I draw this fleet-ing breath,
when my eye-strings close in death,
when I soar to worlds un-known,
see you on the mer-cy throne!
Rock of A-ges, cleft for me,
Let me hide; a shel-ter be


a. Ro-ca de la~e-ter-ni-dad,
fuis-te~a-bier-ta tú por mí.
Sé mi~es-con-de-de-ro fiel,
só-lo~en-cuen-tro paz en ti;
ri-co, lim-pio ma-nan-tial,
en el cual la-va-do fui.

b. Aun-que se-a siem-pre fiel,
aun-que lu-che sin ce-sar,
só-lo~en ti te-nien-do fe,
sal-va-ción he de go-zar;
Sé mi~es-con-de-de-ro fiel,
ro-ca de la~e-ter-ni-dad.

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2005 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 12:34 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

January 16, 2006

604R How Good and Pleasant

Paraphrase of Psalm 133.

RAMOTH (8.8.6.8.8.6.)

1. How good and pleas-ant is the sight
when all souls make it a de-light
to dwell in un-i-ty;
O Love is an a-noin-ting oil
that con-se-crates our dai-ly toil
in sweet-est a-mi-ty.

2. O Love in peace and joy di-stills,
as down the slopes of Her-mon’s hills
re-fresh-ing dew des-cends;
O God pro-vides a bless-ing there,
so all shall walk in Truth and share
in life that nev-er ends.

3. How good and pleas-ant is the sight
when all souls make it a de-light
to dwell in un-i-ty;
O now des-cends the spir-it's care,
so all shall in Love's mer-cy share
true life and am-i-ty.

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2006 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 06:02 AM | Comments (0)

January 17, 2006

605R Love Alone is the Worthy Law

Title: "Love Alone is the Worthy Law," Christina Rossetti (1893), rev. REH (2006), LANGRAN, 10.10.10.10., James Langran (1863). English poet Christina Rossetti, born in 1830 of Italian parents living in exile in England, Anglican and much influenced by the Oxford Movement to return to more "Anglo-Catholic" modes of worship, wrote Victorian verse that described intense religious experiences. The words below appear in her poem "Quinquagesima," Latin for 50 (days before Easter), or the Sunday before Ash Wednesday (technically Transfiguration Sunday); depending on when Easter fell, this might well be within the approximate time of St. Valentine's Day. St. Valentine, by legend, married Roman soldiers when they were prohibited from doing so. See also Ephesians 2:15, "[Christ] has abolished the law with its commandments and ordinances, that he might create in himself one new humanity in place of the two, thus making peace."

LANGRAN (10.10.10.10.)

1. Love a-lone is the wor-thy law of love:
All oth-er laws have pre-sup-posed a taint:
Love is the law from kind-led saint to saint,
from lamb to lamb, from dove to answe-ring dove.


2. Love is the mo-tive of all things that move,
har-mon-ious by free will with-out con-straint:
Love learns and teach-es: love shall us ac-quaint
with all we lack, and all we lack is love.

Word Score
PDF Score
Noteworthy Composer File

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2006 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

Posted by rehurst at 01:30 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack