February 01, 2005

Introduction

Hymns of the Spirit is the name of at least two hymnals. Samuel Longfellow edited the first in 1864; Edward P. Daniels and Robert L. Sanders edited the second in 1937 "for use in the Free Churches of America." The later was most recently republished by the Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations (Boston) in 1981. It is currently out of print, though it continued throughout much of the 20th century to be used by member congregations with a broadly Christian or theistic orientation. It continues to be used by at least a handful of congregations to this day.

The 1937 hymnal, herein referred to as Hymns of the Spirit Two, served as the principal hymnal of most Unitarian and Universalist churches in the United States and Canada for the better part of three decades (though as a potential audience, its editors envisioned any "community church ... which desire[s] a hymn book at once modern in tone and inclusive in spirit.") The language of Hymns of the Spirit Two is largely theist and Christian, although there are concessions to the budding humanist and pluralist expressions of religion that later gained wider currency in the Unitarian Universalist movement. It remains a uniquely rich deposit of Deist hymns, many initially penned or edited by Samuel Longfellow in the what is herein referred to as Hymns of the Spirit One. Many of these hymns are sung to this day in "liberal" churches, be they Unitarian Universalist or more traditionally Christian, but many equally worthy works do not seem to have lept beyond the pages of Hymns of the Spirit Two. This applies to much of the work contained in the hymnal. In fact, of the close to 600 hymns in the hymnal, not many more than 90 of these pieces, in some form or another, are contained in the current Unitarian Universalist hymnal, Singing the Living Tradition, published in 1993.

In a denomination such as the Unitarian Universalist Association, where the powers that be in Boston seek to impose nothing at all in terms of liturgy or theology, on member congregations, it perhaps is nothing short of a grand irony that the so-called "official" 1993 hymnal has such penetration. The purpose of this website is to invite others, within all "liberal" churches, Unitarian, Universalist and the wider Christian world, to explore the varied strands of our hymnody, beyond the confines of any one hymnbook.

On-line publishing technology and the Internet make this possible. As each entry for each hymn in Hymns of the Spirit Two is made below, users of this website will find moderately recast words (as the words in their original form are now in the public domain, usually available on Cyberhymnal), with modern language sensitivies in mind. These words are paired with a tune, likewise from the public domain. Typically if the original tune from Hymns of the Spirit Two is a singable one (in the wholly subjective view of the webdesigner), that tune is used; otherwise, one or more appropriate tunes are substituted. The hope is that the tune continues to be "traditional," yet singable from a contemporary perspective. All tunes used below are likewise believed to be in the public domain. It should be noted that in a few cases, the form a hymn tune in the public domain differs in a small way from the version in Hymns of the Spirit Two (regarding key, for example). The order and numbering of the hymns here follow that of the 1937 hymnal. Hymns numbered 600 and above are not contained in Hymns of the Spirit Two.

The final product is not in the public domain, as it represents the effort of the undersigned to revise hymn lyrics, and pair them with new hymn tunes when necessary. Nonetheless, congregations and small groups are free to use these hymns for non-profit worship purposes as noted below. They can be printed out as PDF files, as Noteworthy Composer files (allowing changes in format and the like to be made), and as Word files (which allows better print quality, but which requires Noteworthy Composer as well). A free "read-only" version of Noteworthy Composer is available on the web (check Google); otherwise, the program is relatively inexpensive. Symphony users should find that Noteworthy Composer files will open in their programs. The first hyperlink in blue in each entry, containing the name of the hymn tune and meter, when selected should play the Midi file in Windows media player.

It is hoped that with these changes, the words of the Hymns of the Spirit Two, here presented as Hymns of the Spirit Three, will come alive for a new generation. Indeed in some cases, it is hoped that the words of Hymns of the Spirit Two will come alive in another language, as lyrics are persented in Spanish and other languages. Minor changes are made to Spanish-language lyrics in keeping with the thelogical emphases and language preferences of the churches born of the radical wing of the Reformation.

Do write with criticisms and suggestions, and kudos of course, as the spirit moves you. I thank in particular all of my fellow congregants at Universalist National Memorial Church in Washington, D.C., for their support and kind words. Anyone who might feel inclined to support this project is invited to make a donation instead to Universalist National; contact information might be found by clicking on link in the previous sentence. Musical contributions or suggestions are likewise welcome, even if these fall beyond the parameters of the Hymns of the Spirit Two strictly speaking. Submissions may be made by contacting the editor at richardehurst at gmail dot com.

The best link for interpreting the perhaps unfamiliar lectionary information at the right ("Proper 13A," etc.) is by visiting The Text This Week. On the left side of that site, under "Calendar," each of the three so-called lectionary years (A, B and C) is set out in actual dates, with full biblical readings. An untold number of other resources are also provided for each day on the church calendar, from just about every imaginable point of view. Happy exploring!

In faith,


Richard E. Hurst
richardehurst [@] gmail.com

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March 01, 2005

1R Praise to the Living God / Yigdal Elohim Chai

Original Title: "Praise to the Living God," Daniel ben Judah Dayyan (14th century), trans. Max Lansberg and Newton Mann, LEONI, 6.6.8.4.6.6.8.4., Synagogue Melody, arr. Meyer Lyon; New Name: "Praise to the Living God / Yigdal Elohim Chai," same hymn tune, rev. REH (2005). Moses Maimoides (1130-1205) drew up thirteen articles of Jewish faith; these were latter versified by Daniel ben Juddah Dayyan. The translation here is largely based on the work of Lansberg, a Reform rabbi, and Mann, a Unitarian minister, who worked collaboratively in the 1880s. A recast version (with additional work by Mann's successor, William Channing Gannett), omitting one stanza, appears as no. 215 in Singing the Living Tradition under the same name; under the name "The God of Abraham Praise," the hymn appears as no. 24 in The New Century Hymnal. Both appear to the tune LEONI, named for Meyer Lyon, cantor at the Great Synagogue in London. The lyrics here appear with all four verses, and two of the original Hebrew verses. The text makes reference to numerous texts in the Hebrew Bible; "I AM WHO I AM, this is my name forever," Exodus 3:14-15; God is the "first and last," Isaiah 44:6; the law is written on our hearts, Jeremiah 31:27-34. "So now, Israel, give heed to the statutes and ordinances," Deuteronomy 4:1.

LEONI (6.6.8.4.6.6.8.4.)

1. Praise to the liv-ing God! All prais~ed be~the Name,
who was and is~and is~to be, for aye the same!
The One E-ter-nal God ere aught that now ap-pears:
the First, the Last, be-yond all thought and time-less years!

2. Form-less, all love-ly forms, de-clare~God's love~li-ness;
no ho-li-ness~on earth~can e'er the Name ex-press.
God is Our Sove-reign sure, Cre-a-tion sings out praise;
And, ev-ery-where, a-bove, be-low, God's will o-beys.


3. The spir-it flow-eth free, high surg~ing where~it will;
in proph-et's word~did speak~of old, and speak-eth still.
Es-tab-lished is the law, and peer-less it shall stand,
deep writ up-on the hu-man heart, on sea or land.

4. E-ter-nal life hath God im-plant~ed in~the soul;
such love shall be~our strength~and stay while a-ges roll.
Praise to the liv-ing God! All prais-ed be the Name,
who was, and is, and is to be, for aye the same.


a. Yig-dal e-lo-him chai ve-yish-ta-bach,
nim-tsa ve-ein eit el me-tsi-u-to.
E-chad ve-ein ya-chid ke-yi-chu-do,
ne-lam ve-gam ein sof le-ach-du-to.

b. Ein lo de-mut ha-guf ve-ei-no-guf,
lo-na-a roch ei-lav ke-du-sha-to.
Kad-mon le-choi da-var a-sher niv-ra
ri-shon ve-ein rei-shit le-rei-shi-to.

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1S Al vivo Dios, loor / Yigdal elohim chai

Título: "Al vivo Dios, loor / Yigdal elohim chai," Daniel ben Judah Dayyan (c. 1400), traductores originales Max Lansberg, rabino reformista, y Newton Mann, pastor unitario (c. 1880), traductor al castellano, George P. Simmonds, rev. REH (2006), LEONI, 6.6.8.4.6.6.8.4., tonada hebrea, arm. de Meyer Lyon, el cantor de la Gran Sinagoga de Londres. No. 28, "Al Dios de Abraham, loor," en Mil voces para celebrar, pero con la letra traducida del metodista Thomas Olivers. "Ahora, pues, Israel, oye los estatutos y decretos," Deuteronomio 4:1 (RVR 1995).

LEONI (6.6.8.4.6.6.8.4.)

1. ¡Al vi-vo Dios, lo-or! Sus nom-bres ce-le-brad.
¡Al que~e-ra, es y~a-ún se-rá, mag-ni-fi-cad!
El so-lo,~e-ter-no Dios, de to-do~es cre-a-dor,
al ú-ni-co su-pre-mo ser can-tad lo-or.

2. Su dul-ce~es-pí-ri-tu ¡cuán li-bre~es en su~ob-rar!
Su voz por el pro-fe-ta~a-ún nos quie-re~ha-blar.
En to-do co-ra-zón su ley es-cri-ta~es-tá;
es tras-cen-den-te~y siem-pre fiel en tie-rra~y mar.

3. La Vi-da se so-pló en ca-da~hu-ma-no ser.
Su~a-mor am-pa-ro nos se-rá sin fe-ne-cer.
¡Al vi-vo Dios, lo-or! Sus nom-bres ce-le-brad.
¡Al que~e-ra, es y~a-ún se-rá, mag-ni-fi-cad!

a. Yig-dal e-lo-him chai ve-yish-ta-bach,
nim-tsa ve-ein eit el me-tsi-u-to.
E-chad ve-ein ya-chid ke-yi-chu-do,
ne-lam ve-gam ein sof le-ach-du-to.

b. Ein lo de-mut ha-guf ve-ei-no-guf,
lo-na-a roch ei-lav ke-du-sha-to.
Kad-mon le-choi da-var a-sher niv-ra
ri-shon ve-ein rei-shit le-rei-shi-to.

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March 02, 2005

2R Praise the Sovereign, Heavens Adoring

Original Title: "Praise the Lord, Ye Heavens, Adore Him," Foundling Chapel College by Thomas Coram (1796) & Edward Osler, MENDELSSOHN (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.), Jacob Ludwig Mendelssohn-Bartholdy; New Title: "Praise the Sovereign, Heavens Adoring," rev. REH (2008), HYFRYDOL (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.), Rowland Hugh Pritchard, 1855.

HYFRYDOL (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.)

1. Praise the Sove-reign, heavens a-dor-ing;
An-gels sing-ing in the height;
Sun and moon, at once re-joic-ing;
Sing-ing, all the stars of light.
Praise the One who once has spo-ken;
Worlds the migh-ty voice o-beyed.
Laws, which nev-er shall be brok-en
For their gui-dance God has made.

2. Praise the Sove-reign ev-er glo-rious;
Nev-er shall the pro-mise fail.
God has made the saints vic-to-rious;
Sin and death shall not pre-vail.
Praise the One of our sal-va-tion;
Hosts on high, that power pro-claim.
Heaven and earth and all cre-a-tion,
Laud and mag-ni-fy the Name.

3. Wor-ship, hon-or, glo-ry, bless-ing,
God, we of-fer un-to you.
Young and old, all praise ex-press-ing,
In glad hom-age come to you.
All the saints in heaven a-dore you;
We would bow be-fore your throne.
As your an-gels serve be-fore you,
So on earth your will be done.

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The first stanza of the hymn is a paraphrase of Psalm 148; see also Psalm 29. See also Wisdom of Solomon 1:14, "And the generative forces of the world are wholesome, and there is no destructive poison in them;" compare the lyrics "death on earth shall not prevail."

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March 03, 2005

3R Holy Spirit, Source of Gladness

Original Title: "Holy Spirit, Source of Gladness," Paulus Gerhardt (1648), trans. John Christian Jacobi (c. 1725), adapted Samuel Longellow, ALTA TRINITA BEATA, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., Laudi Sprituali (14th Century), adapted Robert L. Sanders (1937); New Title: "Holy Spirit, Source of Gladness," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Paulus Gerhart was a 17th Century German Lutheran; Samuel Longfellow was a 19th Century American Unitarian, and editor of Hymns of the Spirit One. The hymn echoes Psalm 4:7, "you have put a gladness in my heart." "To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit for the common good," 1 Corinthians 12:7. It does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

ALTA TRINITA BEATA (8.7.8.7. D)

1. Ho-ly Spir-it source of glad-ness
come with all thy ra-diance bright,
o'er our wea-ri-ness and sad-ness,
breathe thy life and shed thy light!
Send us thine il-lu-mi-na-tion,
ba-nish all our fears at length;
rest up-on this con-gre-ga-tion,
spir-it of un-fail-ing strength.

2. Let that love which knows no mea-sure,
now in quick-ening showers de-scend,
bring-ing us the rich-est trea-sure
we can wish or God can send.
Hear our earn-est sup-pli-ca-tion,
ev-'ry strug-gling heart re-lease;
rest up-on this con-gre-ga-tion,
spir-it of un-trou-bled peace!

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March 04, 2005

4R Sing Praise to the Sovereign

Original Title: "Praise the Lord of Heaven," Thomas Briarly Brown (1844), WARUM SIND DIE THRÄNEN, 6.5.6.5.6.5.6.5., Johann Abraham Peter Schultz (1785); New Title: "Sing Praise to the Sovereign," rev. REH (2008), ST. DENIO, 11.11.11.11., Welsh Melody (1839).

ST. DENIO (11.11.11.11.)

1. Sing praise to the Sove-reign who reigns in the height;
Prais-es sing, all an-gels, sing praise, stars of light;
Sing praise, skies, and wa-ters which a-bove the skies,
When the word com-mand-ed, firm-ly did a-rise.

2. Prais-es sing, all foun-tains of the deeps and seas,
Rocks and hills and moun-tains, ce-dars and all trees;
Sing praise, clouds and va-pors, snow and hail and fire,
Stor-my wind ful-fil-ling on-ly one de-sire.

3. Sing praise, fowls and cat-tle, all queens and all kings;
Sing praise, men and wo-men, all cre-a-ted things;
For the name of God is ex-cel-lent a-lone;
On the earth, a foot-stool; o'er heav-en, a throne.

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The hymn lyrics constitue a paraphrase of Psalm 148; see also Pslam 29. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

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March 05, 2005

5R O Holy Angels Bright

Original Title: "Ye Holy Angels Bright," Richard Baxter (1681), DARWALL'S 148TH, 6.6.6.6.4.4.4.4., John Darwall (1770); New Title: "O Holy Angels Bright," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Baxter was a 17th century Anglican "Nonconformist." John Darwall's tune is called simply DARWALL in Hymns of the Spirit Two, a frequently used alternative title for the same piece of music. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. See Revelation 5:11, "the voice of many angels."

DARWALL'S 148TH (6.6.6.6.4.4.4.4.)

1. O ho-ly an-gels bright,
who wait at God's sure hand,
or through the realms of light
fly on di-vine com-mand,
as-sist our song,
for else the theme
too high does seem
for mor-tal tongue.

2. Let not the prais-es grow
on pros-perous heights a-lone,
but in val-leys be-low,
let the great love be known.
Let no dis-tress
curb and con-trol
my wing-ed soul
and praise sup-press.

3. My soul, O bear your part,
tri-umph in God a-bove,
and with a well-tuned heart,
O sing the songs of love.
Let all your days
till life shall end,
what-ever is sent,
be filled with praise. A-men.


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March 06, 2005

6R O Worship Thy God

Original Title: "O Worship Thy King," Robert Grant, LYONS, 10.10.11.11., attributed to Johann Michael Haydn, New Title: "O Worship Thy God," rev. REH (2006), OLD 104TH, 10.10.11.11, Thomas Ravenscroft (1621). As a paraphrase of Psalm 104, a recast version of Robert Grant's hymn is offered here set to OLD 104TH, a tune with which it is sometimes paired. Other versions of Grant's hymn, with inclusive language and set to LYONS, may be found in Singing the Living Tradition as "We Worship Thee, God," as no. 285, and in the New Century Hymnal as "We Worship You, God" as no. 26.

OLD 104TH (10.10.11.11)

1. O wor-ship thy God, all glor-ious a-bove,
and grate-ful-ly sing that pow-er and love;
Our shield and de-fend-er, the An-cient of Days,
pa-vil-ioned in splen-dor, and gird-ed with praise.


2. O tell of that might, and sing of that grace,
whose robe is the light, whose ca-no-py space,
whose char-iots of jus-tice deep thun-der-clouds form,
and dim is the path on the wings of the storm.


3. The earth with its store of won-ders un-told,
al-migh-ty, thy power hath found-ed of old;
Es-tab-lished it fast by a change-less de-cree,
and round it hath cast, like a man-tle, the sea.

4. Thy boun-ti-ful care, what tongue can re-cite?
It breathes in the air, it shines in the light;
It streams from the hills, it des-cends to the plain,
and sweet-ly dis-tills in the dew and the rain.


5. Frail child-ren of dust, and fee-ble as frail,
by thy end-less trust we fear not to fail.
Thy wing with its shelt-er-ing touch does us mend,
for thou art our mak-er, re-deem-er and friend.

Original verses composed by William Kethe (1561) that do not appear in Hymns of the Spirit (1937):

a. My soule praise the Lord, speake good of his Name,
O Lord our great God how doest thou ap-peare,
So pass-ing in glor-ie, that great is thy fame,
Hon-our and maj-es-tie, in thee shine most cleare.

b. His cham-ber beames lie, in the clouds full sure,
Which as his char-iot, are made him to beare.
And there with much swift-ness, his course doth en-dure:
Up-on the wings rid-ing, of winds in the aire.

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March 07, 2005

7R Praise Be to God, the Almighty

Original Title: "Praise to the Lord, the Almighty," Joachim Neander (1680) trans. Catherine Winkworth (1858), LOBE DEN HERREN, 14.14.4.7.8., Straslund Gesangbuch (1665); New Title: "Praise Be to God, the Almighty," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune.

LOBE DEN HERREN (14.14.4.7.8.)

1. Praise be to God, the Al-migh-ty, who rules o'er cre-a-tion!
O my soul praise the One who is our health and sal-va-tion!
Join the great throng, wake harp and psal-ter and song;
Sound forth in glad a-dor-a-tion.

2. Praise be to God, who o'er all things is won-drous-ly reign-ing,
Who, as on eag-le's wings, is us so gent-ly sus-tain-ing!
Have you not seen all that is need-ed has been
Set by a gra-cious or-dain-ing?

3. Praise be to God, who has fear-less-ly, joy-ful-ly, made you;
Health has vouch-safed and, when heed-less-ly fall-ing, has stayed you.
What need or grief ev-er has failed of re-lief?
Wings of true mer-cy have shade you.


4. Praise be to God, who does pros-per your work and de-fend you;
Sure-ly such good-ness and mer-cy here dai-ly at-tend you.
Pon-der a-new what the Al-migh-ty can do,
Who with great love does be-friend you.


5. Praise be to God, who, when tem-pests their war-fare are wag-ing,
Who, when the el-e-ments mad-ly a-round you are rag-ing,
Bids them to cease, turns then their fu-ry to peace,
Whirl-winds and wa-ters as-suag-ing.


6. Praise be to God, O join all in sin-cere de-di-ca-tion;
All that has life and breath, come now in deep con-tem-pla-tion!
Let the A-men sound from all peo-ple a-gain,
Gather-ed in true a-dor-a-tion.

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The hymn is a recasting of Psalm 105, though there are echoes of other many other psalms in the hymn as well. "For as the rain and the snow come down from heaven, and do not return there until they have watered the earth, making it bring forth and sprout, giving seed to the sower and bread to the eater, so shall my word be that goes out from my mouth; it shall not return to me empty, but it shall accomplish that which I purpose, and succeed in the thing for which I sent it," Isaiah 55:10-11 (NRSV).

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7S Sing Songs to God, the All-loving

Original Title: "Praise to the Lord, the Almighty," Joachim Neander (1680) trans. Catherine Winkworth (1858), LOBE DEN HERREN, 14.14.4.7.8., Straslund Gesangbuch (1665); New Title: "Sing Songs to God, the Almighty," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Neander was pastor of the Reformed Church in Düsseldorf; this constitutes in essence a recasting of Psalm 105, though there are echoes of other many other psalms in the hymn as well. "For as the rain and the snow come down from heaven, and do not return there until they have watered the earth, making it bring forth and sprout, giving seed to the sower and bread to the eater, so shall my word be that goes out from my mouth; it shall not return to me empty, but it shall accomplish that which I purpose, and succeed in the thing for which I sent it," Isaiah 55:10-11 (NRSV). It appears with four stanzas as "Praise Be to God, the Almighty," as no. 278 in Singing the Living Tradition, and with four stanzas as well at no. 22 in The New Century Hymnal under the name "Sing Praise to God, Who Has Shaped;" the latter retranslated by Madeleine Forell Marshall.

LOBE DEN HERREN (14.14.4.7.8.)

1. Sing songs to God, the All-lov-ing, who sus-tains cre-a-tion!
O my soul praise the Life who is our health and sal-va-tion!
Join the great throng, wake harp and psal-ter and song;
Sound forth in glad a-dor-a-tion.

2. Prais-ed be Love, still with all things so won-drous-ly work-ing,
and as on eag-le's wings, is us so gent-ly up-lift-ing!
Have you not seen all that Earth need-ed has been
moved by Life's gra-cious or-dain-ing?

3. Re-mem-ber Truth, that has fear-less-ly, joy-ful-ly, freed you;
Chains has reclaimed and, when heed-less-ly fall-ing, has stayed you.
What need or grief ev-er has failed of re-lief?
Wings of true mer-cy have shade you.


4. Sing now God's praise, who does pros-per your work and de-fend you;
Life's com-mon mi-ra-cles dai-ly with mer-cy at-tend you.
Pon-der a-new what the Al-migh-ty can do,
who with great love does be-friend you.


5. Thanks now to Peace, when the tem-pests their war-fare are wag-ing,
and when the el-e-ments mad-ly a-round you are rag-ing,
bids them to cease, turns then their fu-ry to ease,
whirl-winds and wa-ters as-suag-ing.


6. Praise the Di-vine, O join all in one true de-di-ca-tion;
all that has life and breath, come now in deep con-tem-pla-tion!
Let the A-men sound from all peo-ple a-gain,
gather-ed in true a-dor-a-tion.


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Continue reading "7S Sing Songs to God, the All-loving"

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7T Alma, bendice a Dios

Título: "Alma, bendice a Dios," Joachim Neander, trad. Fritz Fliedner, rev. REH (2006); LOBE DEN HERREN, 14.14.4.7.8., Straslund Gesangbuch (1665), arm. William Sterndale Bennett. Paráfrasis del Salmo 105, pero con toques de otros salmos también. "Porque como desciende de los cielos la lluvia y la nieve, y no vuelve allá, sino que riega la tierra, y la hace germinar y producir, y da semilla al que siembra, y pan al que come, así será mi palabra que sale de mi boca; no volverá a mí vacía, sino que hará lo que yo quiero, y será prosperada en aquello para que la envié," Isaías 55:10-11 (Reina-Valera 1960). No. 21, "Alma, bendice a Dios," en El Himnario (Church Publishing, Inc. 1998), la editorial de la Iglesia Episcopal (Anglicana) en los Estados Unidos; no. 28 en Mil voces para celebrar.

LOBE DEN HERREN (14.14.4.7.8.)

1. Al-ma, ben-di-ce a Dios, a-mor al-to de glo-ria;
de sus mer-ce-des es-té vi-va~en ti la me-mo-ria.
¡Oh, des-per-tad, ar-pa~y sal-ter-io~en-ton-ad
him-nos de~ho-nor y vic-tor-ia.

2. Al-ma, ben-di-ce a Dios, que~a los or-bes go-bier-na,
y te con-du-ce pa-cien-te con ma-no ma-ter-na;
y te guar-dó co-mo me-jor le~ag-ra-dó,
por-que su gra-cia~es e-ter-na.

3. Al-ma, ben-di-ce a Dios, de tu vi-da la fuen-te,
que te cre-ó, y~en sa-lud te sos-tie-ne cle-men-te;
tu de-fen-sor en to-do tran-ce~y do-lor,
su dies-tra~es om-ni-po-ten-te.

4. Al-ma, ben-di-ce a Dios por su a-mor in-fi-ni-to;
con todo~el pue-blo de Dios su~a-la-ban-za re-pi-to.
¡Dios, mi sa-lud, de to-do bien ple-ni-tud,
se-as por siem-pre ben-di-to! A-mén.

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7U Alma, bendice Amor

Título original: "Alma, bendice a Dios," Joachim Neander, trad. Fritz Fliedner; LOBE DEN HERREN, 14.14.4.7.8., Straslund Gesangbuch (1665), arm. William Sterndale Bennett; Título nuevo: "Alma, bendice Amor," rev. REH (2006), la misma tonada. Paráfrasis del Salmo 105, pero con toques de otros salmos también. "Porque como desciende de los cielos la lluvia y la nieve, y no vuelve allá, sino que riega la tierra, y la hace germinar y producir, y da semilla al que siembra, y pan al que come, así será mi palabra que sale de mi boca; no volverá a mí vacía, sino que hará lo que yo quiero, y será prosperada en aquello para que la envié," Isaías 55:10-11 (Reina-Valera 1960). No. 21, "Alma, bendice a Dios," en El Himnario (Church Publishing, Inc. 1998), la editorial de la Iglesia Episcopal (Anglicana) en los Estados Unidos; no. 28 en Mil voces para celebrar.

LOBE DEN HERREN (14.14.4.7.8.)

1. Al-ma, ben-di-ce A-mor, po-der al-to de glo-ria;
de sus mer-ce-des es-té vi-va~en ti la me-mo-ria.
¡Oh, des-per-tad, ar-pa~y sal-ter-io~en-ton-ad
him-nos de~ho-nor y vic-tor-ia.


2. Al-ma, ben-di-ce Ra-zón, que~a los or-bes go-bier-na,
y te con-du-ce pa-cien-te con ma-no ma-ter-na;
y te guar-dó co-mo me-jor le~ag-ra-dó,
por-que su gra-cia~es e-ter-na.


3. Al-ma, ben-di-ce a Dios, de tu vi-da la fuen-te,
que te cre-ó, y~en sa-lud te sos-tie-ne cle-men-te;
tu de-fen-sor en to-do tran-ce~y do-lor,
su dies-tra~es om-ni-po-ten-te.

4. Al-ma, ben-di-ce Ver-dad por su a-fán in-fi-ni-to;
con todo~el pue-blo de paz su~a-la-ban-za re-pi-to.
¡Dios, mi sa-lud, de to-do bien ple-ni-tud,
se-as por siem-pre ben-di-to! A-mén.

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March 08, 2005

8R Bring, O Morn, Your Music

Original Title: "Bring, O Morn, Thy Music," William Channing Gannett (1893), NICAEA, John Bacchus Dykes (1861); New Title: "Bring, O Morn, Your Music," rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. William Channing Gannett, born in Boston, served Unity Church (Unitarian) in St. Paul, and the Unitarian Church in Rochester, where Susan B. Anthony was amongst his congregants. The last line of each verse echoes Revelations 1:8 (which see), but the hymn as a whole personifies and praises nature, bordering on panentheism (although the lyrics textually have nature worshiping God as well, as "Our Creator" and "Mighty Giver"). See also Wisdom of Solomon 1:13-14, "God did not make death, and he does not delight in the death of the living. For he created all things that they might exist." Gannett wrote the hymn as a summary of the 1893 World Parliament of Religions in Chicago. It appears in Singing the Living Tradition as "Bring, O Morn, Thy Music, as no. 39, but does not appear in The New Century Hymnal. This version of NICAEA is in F-sharp, although NICAEA in Hymns of the Spirit Two is in E-flat. See No. 17R herein for a version of NICAEA in E-flat.

NICAEA (12.13.12.10.)

1. Bring, O Morn, your mus-ic! Night,~your star-lit si-lence!
O-ceans, laugh the rap-ture to the storm winds cours-ing free!
Suns and pla-nets cho-rus: you are our Cre-a-tor,
who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be!

2. Life and death, your crea-tures, praise~you, Migh-ty Gi-ver!
Praise and prayer are ris-ing in your beast and bird and tree:
Lo! they praise and van-ish, van-ish at your bidd-ing,
who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be!


3. Light us! lead us! love us! cry~your grop-ing na-tions,
speak-ing in a thou-sand tongues, your name a-lone the plea;
weav-ing free-ly out your ho-ly, hap-py pur-pose,
who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be!


4. Life nor death can part us, you~O Love E-ter-nal,
shep-herd of the wan-dering star and souls that way-ward flee!
Home-ward draws the spir-it to your spir-it yearn-ing,
who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be! A-men.

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8S Desde a aurora

Title: "Desde a aurora," William Channing Gannett (1893), Portuguese translation, Daniel Borges (2005), NICAEA, John Bacchus Dykes (1861). Daniel Borges, born in 1959, attends a Baptist church in São Paulo, Brazil. He has translated a number of English-language hymns into Portuguese, and appears to have composed new hymns as well. This is a translation of "Bring, O Morn, Thy Music," described in detail in the entry under 8R. It may be the only extant Portuguese-language translation (or adaptation) of a Unitarian or Universalist hymn.

NICAEA (12.13.12.10.)

1. Des-de a au-ro-ra à noi-te es-tre-la-da!
Jor-ra do rio a á-gua e ven-tos de a-mor!
Os pla-ne-tas can-tam Tuas ma-ra-vi-lhas,
Foi, É e sem-pre se-rá o Sal-va-dor!

2. A vi-da e a mor-te a Ti re-fle-tem!
Lou-vor e o-ra-ção pe-la Tua per-mis-são;
Tu-do o que e-xis-te foi por Ti cri-a-do
E a nós deu Sua e-ter-na Sal-va-ção!

3. An-da-mos no es-cu-ro, gui-e-nos oh! Je-sus,
Em to-da e qual-quer lín-gua te da-mos lou-vor,
Ce-ga-men-te e bem fe-liz se-gui-mos,
Foi, É e sem-pre se-rá o Cri-a-dor!

4. Es-tar se-pa-ra-dos! Nem pe-la mor-te,
Pa-ra to-das as al-mas er-ran-tes, és Pas-tor!
Com o Ce-les-tial Lar es-ta-mos a so-nhar,
Fui, sou e sem-pre se-rei so-nha-dor!

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March 09, 2005

9R Our God, Our God, Thou Shinest Here

Original Title: "Our God, Our God, Thou Shinest Here," Thomas Hornblower Gil (1846), CORONATION, 8.6.8.6.8.6., Oliver Holden (1793); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), MORNING SONG, 8.6.8.6.8.6., at­trib­ut­ed to Elkan­ah K. Dare (1782-1826), arranged by C. W. Douglas. Thomas Hornblower Gil was a lay English Unitarian hymn writer, who later joined the Congregational Church. He wrote nearly 200 hymns, and had definitive ideas about what a hymn should be: "Hymns are not meant to be theological statements, expositions of doctrine, or enunciations of precepts; they are utterances of the soul in its manifold moods of hope and fear, joy and sorrow, love, wonder, and aspiration. ... Hymns are meant and made to be sung. The best and most glorious hymns cannot be more exactly defined than as divine love songs." The lyrics here seem to speak of the Gospel of John: "The true light, which enlightens everyone, was coming into the world." John 1:9. "[John] came as a witness to testify to the light." John 1:7a. The hymn does not appear in either Singing the Living Tradition or in The New Century Hymnal.

MORNING SONG (8.6.8.6.8.6.)

1. Our God, our God, thou shin-est here,
thine own this lat-ter day.
To us thy ra-diant steps ap-pear,
here goes thy glo-rious way!
To us thy ra-diant steps ap-pear,
here goes thy glo-rious way!

2. We shine not on-ly with the light
thou shed-dest down of yore.
On us thou stream-est strong and bright,
thy com-ings are not o'er.
On us thou stream-est strong and bright,
thy com-ings are not o'er.

3. All op-en to our souls shall be
thy glo-ry's hi-ding-place.
Our mo-thers had not all of thee,
new births are in thy grace;
Our fa-thers had not all of thee,
new births are in thy grace.

4. Thou come-est here, thou stand-est by,
our work be-gins to shine.
Thou dwell-est with us migh-ti-ly,
on comes the years di-vine!
Thou dwell-est with us migh-ti-ly,
on comes the years di-vine!

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March 10, 2005

10R Ruler and Power On High

Original Title: "Come, Thou Almighty King," Anonymous (before 1757), ITALIAN HYMN, 6.6.4.6.6.6.4., Felice Giardini (1769); New Title: "Ruler and Power on High," rev. REH (2007), same hymn tune. The hymn first appeared in George Whitefield's Collection of Hymns for Social Worship (1757); some attribute the hymn to Charles Wesley. The tune ITALIAN HYMN was written specifically for the hymn. "God reigneth over the nations; God sitteth upon the throne of his holiness." Psalm 47:8; see also Revelation 19:6, Isaiah 52:7. "Wisdom has built her house . . .She has sent out her servant-girls, she calls from the highest places in the town," Proverbs 9:1-3. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but it does appear in The New Century Hymnal as "Come Now, Almighty God," as no. 275.

ITALIAN HYMN (6.6.4.6.6.6.4.)

1. Rul-er and power on high,
to you our prais-es fly;
Your name we raise,
Fa-ther all-glo-ri-ous,
Mo-ther vic-to-ri-ous,
come and reign o-ver us,
An-cient of Days.

2. Come now all-gra-cious Lord,
by heaven and earth a-dored;
our prayer at-tend;
Wis-dom, your chil-dren bless,
give your good word suc-cess;
Make your own ho-li-ness
on us des-cend.

3. Ne-ver from us de-part,
but rule in ev-ery heart;
hence, e-ver-more.
Your sove-reign ma-jes-ty
may we in glo-ry see,
and to e-ter-ni-ty,
love and a-dore. A-men.

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10S ¡Oh santo, eterno Dios!

Título: ¡Oh santo, eterno Dios!, autor anónimo, traductor Vicente Mendoza ("Come Thou Almighty King," en inglés), alt. REH (2007), ITALIAN HYMN, 6.6.4.6.6.6.6.4., Felice de Giardini (1769). "Como aquel a quien consuela su madre, así os consolaré yo a vosotros," Isaías 66:13 (Reina-Valera 1960), veáse también 2 Esdras 1:28-30, Eclesiástico 15:1-3. "¡Jerusalén, Jerusalén, ... cuántas veces quise juntar a tus hijos, como la gallina a sus polluelos debajo de sus alas!," Lucas 13:31-35. "La sabiduría [sofía, en griego] clama en las calles, alza su voz en las plazas," Proverbios 1:20. Aparece sin revisiones como número 11 en el himnario metodista Mil voces para celebrar (Abingdon Press: 1996), sin derechos de autor indicados en ese tomo.̆̆̆

English speakers should note that revised stanzas two and three make references to the feminine divine. These include "motherly redeemer" in stanza two (echoing Jesus' reference to God as a mother hen in Luke, and to Isaiah's image of God as a consoling mother), and "heavenly Sophia" in stanza three, meant to resonate with Proverbs' God of Wisdom.

ITALIAN HYMN (6.6.4.6.6.6.4.)

1. ¡Oh, san-to,~e-ter-no Dios!
Al-za-mos nues-tra voz
en gra-ti-tud
por lo que tú nos das
con sin i-gual ar-dor
han-llan-do nues-tra paz
en tu am-or.

2. ¡Ma-ter-no re-den-tor!
Te da-mos con a-mor
el co-ra-zón;
y tú nos pue-des ver
que~hu-mil-des a tu~al-tar,
ve-ni-mos a tra-er
pre-cio-so don.

3. ¡So-fí-a* ce-les-tial!
O-í-mos tu se-ñal
y tu bon-dad
de-rra-me~en nues-tro ser
di-vi-na cla-ri-dad,
pa-ra po-der vi-vir
en li-ber-tad.

* Es decir, Sabiduría.

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March 11, 2005

11R Our Mothering Father

Original Title: "Our Father, Unto Thee," Byron G. Russell, OLIVET, 6.6.4.6.6.6.4., New Title, "Our Mothering Father," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Russell was a 19th century Universalist minister, born in 1850. The hymn in some respects represents a reworking of the Lord's Prayer, Matthew 6:9-13, Luke 11:2-4. The hymn appears in neither Hymns of the Spirit Two nor in The New Century Hymnal. "Mothering" in the revised hymn title is a translation of what is normally translated from the Hebrew as "merciful," or literally "womb-like." The phrase occurs in a number of hymns in the various versions of Music For Liturgy and other elements of worship produced by St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church (typically for unrestricted local reproduction) in San Francisco, California.

OLIVET (6.6.4.6.6.6.4.)

1. Our Mothe-ring Fa-ther be
with us now joy-ous-ly,
as voi-ces raise
for all your love has wrought,
our lives with bless-ings fraught
trans-cend-ing all our thought,
we speak your praise.

2. O God, no lips a-lone
could our joy-ful-ness own,
and wor-ship you,
but may our lives ex-press
that which our hearts con-fess,
and we in ho-li-ness
our souls re-new.


3. And may our hands reach out
to those who round a-bout
de-mand our love.
In ev-ery hour of need
may we their plead-ings heed,
til earth be-comes in-deed
like heaven a-bove. A-men.


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March 12, 2005

12R We Lift Our Hearts In Thanks Today

Original Title: "We Lift Our Hearts in Thanks Today," Percival Chubb (1860-1960), PRAETORIUS, C.M., Harmoniae Hymnorum Scholae Gorlicensis (1599); New Title: Same hymn title, ELLACOMBE, 7.6.7.6. D, Gesangbuch der Herzogl W. k. Hofkapelle (Wurttemberg 1784). Percival Chubb was an English Ethical Culturist who later moved to the United States. The hymn appears as no. 355 in Singing the Living Tradition, but does not appear in The New Century Hymnal.

ELLACOMBE (7.6.7.6. D).

1. We lift our hearts in thanks~to-day
for all the gifts of life;
And, first, for peace that turns~a-way
the en-mi-ties of strife.
And, next, the beau-ty of~the earth
its flowers and love-ly things,
the spring's great mir-a-cle~of birth
with sound of songs and wings.

2. Then, har-vests of its teem~ing soil
in or-chard, croft and field;
But, more, the ser-vice and~the toil
of those who helped them yield.
And, most, the gifts of hope~and love,
of wis-dom, truth and right,
the gifts that shine like stars~a-bove
to chart the world by night.

3. As we re-ceive, so let~us give
with rea-dy, gene-rous hand;
rich fruit-age from the lives~we live
to bless our home and land.
We lift our hearts in thanks~to-day
for all the gifts of life;
And e'er for peace that turns~a-way
the en-mi-ties of strife.

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March 13, 2005

13R Rejoice, You Pure In Heart

Original Title: "Rejoice, Ye Pure in Heart," Edward Hayes Pulmptre (1865), MARION, 6.6.8.6.4.6., Arthur Henry Messiter (1883); New Title: "Rejoice You Pure in Heart," rev. REH (2006), ICH HALTE TREULICH STILL, S.M.D., attributed to Bach (1736). The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but does appear in revised form as "Rejoice, You Pure in Heart," as no. 55 to MARION and as no. 71 to VINEYARD HAVEN in The New Century Hymnal. Pulmptre was a 19th century English Anglican. One hears Psalm 20 in lyrics about the "festal banner," the first line of Psalm 147 in the refrain, and Phillipians 4:4 in the title line and the refrain, "Rejoice . . . rejoice."

ICH HALTE TREULICH STILL (S.M.D.)

1. Re-joice, you pure in heart,
re-joice give thanks and sing;
your fes-tal ban-ner wave on high--
the cross of Christ rais-ing.

Refrain.
Re-joice, give thanks and sing; Re-joice, give thanks and sing;
Re-joice, re-joice, re-joice, and sing; Re-joice, give thanks and sing!

2. With all the an-gel choirs,
with all the saints of earth,
pour out the strains of joy and bliss,
true rap-ture, nob-lest mirth. Refrain.


3. Your clear ho-san-nas raise;
And al-le-lu-ias loud;
While an-swer-ing ech-oes up-ward float,
like wreaths of incense cloud. Refrain.

4. With voice as full and strong
as o-cean’s surg-ing praise,
send forth the hymns an-ces-tors loved,
the psalms of an-cient days. Refrain.

5. At last the toil shall end,
the wear-ied ones shall rest,
the pil-grims find the ho-ly home,
where saints are tru-ly blest. Refrain.

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March 14, 2005

14R Unto Thy Temple, Lord, We Come

Original Title: "Unto Thy Temple, Lord, We Come," Robert Collyer (1873), DUKE STREET, L.M., John Hatton (1793), New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (verse 5), same hymn tune. Coll­yer was born in England and later moved to the United States; he first served Methodist churches, then Unitarian congregations. He wrote this hymn for the ded­i­ca­tion of Un­i­ty Church (Unitarian) in Chi­ca­go. He became the first pastor of that church in 1859. "I will open rivers in high places, and fountains in the midst of the valleys," Isaiah 41:18, see also Isaiah 43:20. "Where two or more are gathered in my name, there I am." Matthew 18:20. The hymn under the same name appears with verses 1, 2 and 4 in Singing the Living Tradition; it does not appear in The New Century Hymnal.

DUKE STREET (L.M.)

1. Un-to thy tem-ple, Lord, we come
with thank-ful hearts to wor-ship thee;
And pray that this may be our home
un-til we touch e-ter-ni-ty.

2. The com-mon home of rich and poor,
of bond and free, and great and small;
large as thy love for-ev-er more,
and warm and bright and good to all.

3. And dwell thou with us in this place,
thou and thy Christ, to guide and bless!
Here make the well-spring of thy grace
like foun-tains in the wil-der-ness.


4. May thy whole truth be spo-ken here;
Thy gos-pel light for-ev-er shine;
Thy per-fect love cast out all fear,
and hu-man life be-come di-vine.


5. Mo-ther-ing Spir-it gath-'ring all,
thy gen-tle arms do us em-brace;
O Womb of time, life heeds thy call;
Thy frame holds strong this ho-ly space.

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March 15, 2005

15R O God to Whom in Ancient Time

Original Title: "O Thou to Whom in Ancient Time," John Pierpont (1824), LUTON, L.M., George Burder (1760); New Title: "O God to Whom in Ancient Time," rev. REH (2005), ST. BARTHOLOMEW, L.M., Ed­ward H. Thorne, Se­lect­ion of Psalm and Hymn Tunes (1858). A Unitarian, Pierpont wrote this hymn for the dedication of the 1824 dedication of the In­de­pend­ent Con­gre­ga­tion­al Church in Bar­ton Square, Sa­lem, Mass­a­chu­setts. "[W]orship the Father in spirit and in truth," John 4:23. "Praise Him with the Lute and Harp," Psalm 150:3b. Genesis 26:15-18, Isaac re-digs Abraham's wells. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

ST. BARTHOLOMEW (L.M.)

1. O God to whom, in an-cient time,
the lyre of He-brews' bards was strung,
whom roy-als praised in song sub-lime,
and pro-phets praised with glow-ing tongue.

2. Not now in Zi-on's height a-lone
the fa-vored wor-ship-er may dwell,
nor where, at sul-try noon, thine own
sat wea-ry by the el-ders' well.


3. From eve-ry place be-low the skies,
the grate-ful song, the fer-vent prayer,
the in-cense of the heart, may rise
to heaven, and find ac-cep-tance there.

4. O God to whom, in an-cient time,
the lyre of pro-phet bards was strung,
to whom at last in ev-ery clime,
shall tem-ples rise and praise be sung!

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March 16, 2005

16R Bearer of Being

Original Title: "Lord of All Being," Oliver Wendell Holmes (1859), TRANSYLVANIA, Hungarian chorale (16th Century); New Title: "Bearer of Being," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. The hymn appears in neither The New Century Hymnal nor in Singing the Living Tradition. Holmes, a 19th century Unitarian from Massachusetts, taught at Har­vard, was a writer, father of Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., and founder of Atlantic Magazine, where the lyrics of this hymn first appeared. "There before was a throne." Revelation 4:2; see also Psalm 103:19. Ephesians 4:25, 5:2, "Let all of us speak the truth to our neighbors . . . and live in love."

TRANSYLVANIA (L.M.)

1. Bear-er of be-ing, throned a-far,
Thy glo-ry flames from sun and star;
Cen-ter and soul of ev-ery sphere,
Yet to each lo-ving heart how near!

2. Sun of our life, thy quick-ening ray,
Sheds on our path the glow of day;
Star of our hope, thy soft-ened light,
Cheers the long watch-es of the night.

3. Our mid-night is thy smile with-drawn;
Our noon-tide is thy gra-cious dawn;
Our rain-bow arch, thy mer-cy’s sign;
All, save the clouds of sin, are thine.

4. Life of all life, be-low, a-bove,
Whose light is truth, whose warmth is love,
Be-fore thy ev-er blaz-ing throne:
We ask no lus-ter of our own.

5. Grant us thy truth to make us free,
And kind-ling hearts that burn for thee,
Till all thy liv-ing al-tars claim
One ho-ly light, one heaven-ly flame. A-men.

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March 17, 2005

17R Holy, Holy, Holy

Original Title: "Holy, Holy, Holy, (Lord God Almighty)," Reginald Heber (arr.)(1826), NICAEA, 11.12.12.10, John Bacchus Dykes (1861); New Title: "Holy, Holy, Holy," arr., same hymn tune. Heber was an Anglican bishop, and the hymn tune name, NICAEA, gives a clue as to the trinitarian impulses of his original words. Unitarians have rearranged his words, omitting references to the Trinity, since at least 1848. Even the 1917 Universalist hymnal, Hymns of the Church, includes, as does Hymns of the Spirit Two, only three verses of Heber's original, with no trinitarian references. Singing the Living Tradition recasts the same three verses as no. 26, "Holy, Holy, Holy, (Author of Creation)," while The New Century Hymnal in four verses gives us "Holy, Holy, Holy, (God the Almighty). The verse regarding "cherubim and seraphim," excised from Unitarian and Universalist hymnody for centuries now, has been restored here. "Holy, holy, holy," are words addressed above in Isaiah 6:3, Revelation 4:8, and in communion prayers in many settings.

NICAEA (11.12.12.10)

1. Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly! O God Al-migh-ty!
Ear-ly in the morn-ing our song shall rise to thee;
Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly, mer-ci-ful and migh-ty!
Per-fect in power, in love, and pu-ri-ty.

2. Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly! All the saints a-dore thee,
Cast-ing down their gol-den crowns a-round the glass-y sea;
Che-rub-im and se~raph-im fall-ing down be-fore thee,
Who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be.

3. Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly! though the night-fall hide thee,
hin-dered by our va-ni-ties we have not eyes to see;
On-ly thou art ho-ly; there is none be-side thee,
Per-fect in power, in love, and pu-ri-ty!

4. Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly! O God Al-migh-ty!
All thy works shall praise thy name, in earth, and sky, and sea;
Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly; mer-ci-ful and migh-ty!
Who was, and is, and ev-er-more shall be.

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17S ¡Santa, santa, santa!

Título original: "¡Santo, santo, santo!," Reginald Heber (1826), trad. Juan B. Cabrera, NICAEA, 13.12.13.12., John B. Dykes (1861); Título nuevo: "¡Santa, santa, santa!," rev. REH (2006), la misma tonada. No. 24 en El Himnario; no. 4 en Mil voces para celebrar. NICAEA here is in F-sharp, as it is in El Himnario, not E-flat, as it is in Hymns of the Spirit Two.

NICAEA (13.12.13.12.)

1. ¡San-ta, san-ta, san-ta! Fuer-za re-den-to-ra,
siem-pre~el la-bio mí-o lo-or-es te da-rá,
¡San-ta, san-ta, san-ta! Tú, Sa-bi-du-rí-a,
an-te ti que~has si-do, que er-es y se-rás.


2. ¡San-ta, san-ta, san-ta! Aun-que~es-tés ve-la-da
e~im-po-si-ble se-a tu glo-ria~a con-tem-plar,
san-ta tú~er-es só-lo, san-ta~y ex-al-ta-da,
en po-der per-fec-to, pu-re-za~y ca-ri-dad.

3. ¡San-ta, san-ta, san-ta! La gran mu-che-dum-bre
de~án-ge-les que cum-plen la san-ta vo-lun-tad.
¡San-ta, san-ta, san-ta! El mun-do te~a-do-re,
Tú de mu-chos nom-bres, ben-di-ta U-ni-dad.

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March 18, 2005

18R O Friend, You Are Calling

Original Title: "Father, Thou Art Calling," James Vila Blake (1880), BROMLEY COMMON, 12.13.12.10, Martin Shaw (1915) (alternative tune: NICAEA, Irregular, John Bacchus Dykes (1861)); New Title: "O Friend, You Are Calling," rev. REH (2006), NICAEA. The revised lyrics do not banish "Father," which one still finds in the body of the hymn. The holy is in addition addressed, however, as "Lady Wisdom." James Vila Blake was an American Unitarian. Neither Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal contains it. "The voice of the Lord is over the waters; the God of glory thunders, the Lord, over many waters." Psalm 29:3; see also Job 38:1-41.

NICAEA (Irregular)

1. O Friend, you are call-ing, call-ing to us plain-ly,
to the spir-it comes your lov-ing mes-sage ev-er-more;
Ho-ly One up-lift us, nor for-ev-er vain-ly, stand call-ing us
and wait-ing at the door.

2. In the whirl-ing tem-pest, and the storm you've lived in,
in the rain, and in the sweet-ness of the af-ter-glow;
sum-mer's gold-en boun-ty, win-ter's snow you've giv-en,
and bloom-ing mea-dows where sweet wat-ers flow.


3. Clear-er still and dear-er is your voice ap-peal-ing,
deep with-in the spir-it's se-cret be-ing speak-ing low.
En-ter La-dy Wis-dom, now the truth re-veal-ing:
From all van-i-ty free us as we go.

4. In you, liv-ing, mov-ing, un-to you up-lift-ing
all your joy-ous, hope-ful trust that gives our
hearts re-pose; Fa-ther, we a-dore you, ask-ing naught
nor fear-ing; Far we wan-der not from your Soul of souls. A-men.

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March 19, 2005

19R How Lovely Is Your Dwelling Place

Original Title: "How Lovely Are Thy Dwellings Fair," John Milton (1645), CAITHNESS, C.M., Melody in Scottish Psalter (1635); New Title: "How Lovely Is Your Dwelling Place," rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Milton was an English Puritan (Congregationalist) and poet, best known for Paradise Lost. The hymn is a recast of Psalm 84. It does not appear in either Singing the Living Tradition or The New Century Hymnal.

CAITHNESS (C.M.)

1. How love-ly is your dwell-ing place,
O God of heaven; how dear
the pleas-ant ta-ber-na-cles' space
where you do dwell so near!

2. The spar-rows have long sought to fly
sky-ward, and your courts view;
the swal-lows in their nests still cry,
O Ho-ly One, for you.

3. Hap-py, who in your house re-side,
where they to you sing praise!
Hap-py, whose strength with you do side,
and in their hearts your ways!

4. They jour-ney on from strength to strength
with joy and glad-some cheer,
till all be-fore our God at length
in Zi-on does ap-pear.

5. O God of heaven that reigns on high,
that we are tru-ly blest
who tru-ly on you do re-ly,
and in you tru-ly rest. A-men
.

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March 20, 2005

20R As Pants the Hart for Cooling Streams

Original Title: "As Pants the Hart for Coolings Streams," Nahum Tate and Nicholas Brady (1696), MARTYRDOM, C.M., Hugh Wilson, arr. R. A. Smith (1825); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but does appear as no. 481 in The New Century Hymnal. The hymn is a recast of Psalm 42.

MARTYRDOM (C.M.)

1. As pants the hart* for cool-ing streams,
when heat-ed in the chase,
so longs my soul, O God, for you
and your re-fresh-ing grace.

2. Why rest-less, why cast down, my soul?
Hope still; and you shall sing
the praise of one who is your God,
your health's e-ter-nal spring.

3. Deep calls to deep, and o-ceans roar;
For God my soul does pine;
O when shall I be-hold your face,
O ma-jes-ty di-vine?

4. Why rest-less, why cast down, my soul?
Trust God who will em-ploy
all aid for you and change these sighs
to thank-ful hymns of joy. A-men


* deer

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March 21, 2005

21R Great God, the Followers of Your Child

Original Title: "Great God, the Followers of Thy Son," Henry Ware, Jr. (1819), HEBRON, L.M., Lowell Mason (1830); New Title: "Great God, the Followers of Your Child," rev. REH (2006), SEWALL, L.M., Frank Sew­all, The Magnificat (New York 1910). Henry Ware, Jr., was a Unitarian minister, and pastor of Second Church in Boston; Sewall was pastor of the Swedenborgian National Church in Washington, D.C. "God's feet," Exodus 24:10; "The truth will set you free," John 8:32. John 3:21, "[W]ho lives by the truth will come to the light." Mark 10:52 (NRSV), "Jesus said to him,, 'Go; your faith has made you well.' Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way." "When they had brought their boats to shore, they left everything and followed him," Luke 5:11 (NRSV). The hymn appears neither in The New Century Hymnal nor in Singing the Living Tradition.

SEWALL (L.M.)

1. Great God, the fol-lowers of your child,
we bow be-fore your ho-ly seat,
to wor-ship you, O Mer-cy Mild,
and pour our wish-es at your feet.


2. O grant your bless-ings here to-day!
O give your peo-ple joy and peace!
The to-kens of your love dis-play,
and fa-vor that shall ne-ver cease.


3. We seek the truth that Je-sus brought;
the path of light we long to tread;
here are the ho-ly teach-ings taught;
and their pur-est in-flu-ence shed.

4. May faith and hope and love a-bound;
ev-ils and er-rors be for-given;
and all on your great day be found
child-ren of God and heirs of heaven!

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March 22, 2005

22R In This Peaceful House of Prayer

Original Title: "In This Peaceful House of Prayer," from Hymns of the Spirit One (1864), SONG 13, 7.7.7.7., Orlando Gibbons, adapted (1623); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), CALVARY (MONK), 7.7.7.7., William Henry Monk (1875). Monk edited Hymns Ancient and Modern, which has sold over 60 million copies. The lyrics appear in the first Hymns of the Spirit, edited by Samuel Longfellow in 1864. It does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. "God's feet," Exodus 24:10. "The heavens, even the highest heaven, cannot contain you. How much less this temple I have built!" 1 Kings 8:27. "Where is the House you will build me?" Isaiah 66:1. "Mothering" in the lyrics is a translation of what is normally translated from the Hebrew as "merciful," or literally "womb-like." The phrase occurs in a number of hymns in the various versions of Music For Liturgy and other elements of worship produced by St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church (typically for unrestricted local reproduction) in San Francisco, California.

CALVARY (MONK) (7.7.7.7.)

1. In this peace-ful house of prayer,
strong-er faith, O God, we seek;
Here we bring each earth-ly care,
you, the strength'-ning mes-sage speak!

2. In our great-est tri-als, we calm,
through you, the way have trod;
In the small-est, may we feel
you are still our hel-per, God.

3. Of your pres-ence and your love,
we more stead-fast feel-ing need,
Till the high and ho-ly thought
hal-low ev-ery sim-ple deed.


4. Mothe-ring Fa-ther, at your feet,
we would lay our earth-born care;
Help us in our need, for you know
the weight that each must bear.

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March 23, 2005

23R Enter In the Holy Temple

Original Title: "God Is In His Holy Temple," from Hymns of the Spirit One (1864), edited by Samuel Longfellow, STUTTGART, 8.7.8.7., Chrisitian Friedrich Witt, adapted (1715)(alternatively AUTUMN, 8.7.8.7., published by Françoise Barthélémon (before 1793)); New Title: "Enter In the Holy Temple," rev. REH (2006), PORTSEA, William Boyce, A Collection of Melodies for the Psalms of David According to the Version of Christopher Smart A.M. ­(circa 1765). The lyrics echo Psalm 122. The hymn appears neither in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

PORTSEA (8.7.8.7.)

1. En-ter in the ho-ly tem-ple,
earth-ly thoughts be si-lent now,
while in rev-erence we as-sem-ble,
and be-fore the Pre-sence bow.

2. O Love is with us for-ev-er,
when we call up-on the Name,
aid-ing ev-ery good en-deav-or,
guid-ing ev-ery up-ward aim.

3. God is in the ho-ly tem-ple,
in the pure and ho-ly mind,
in the reve-rent heart and sim-ple,
in the soul from sense re-fined.

4. Then let ev-ery low e-mo-tion
ban-ished far and sil-ent be,
and our souls in pure de-vo-tion,
Sove-reign, wor-thy tem-ples be!


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April 01, 2005

24R Peace Be To This Congregation

Original Title: "Peace Be To This Congregation," adapted from Charles Wesley, LOBT DEN HERRN, DIE MORGENSONNE, 8.7.8.7., from Naue's Choralbuch (1829); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), ST. MABYN, 8.7.8.7., Arthur H. Brown. Brown was a figure in the Oxford Movement, and led the way for the return of plainchant and Gregorian music in Anglican worship services in the late 19th century. The lyrics here echo Phillipians 4:7, Isaiah 48:18, 66:12. They do not appear in either The New Century Hymnal nor in Singing the Living Tradition.

ST. MABYN (8.7.8.7.)

1. Peace be to this con-gre-ga-tion!
Peace be to each heart there-in!
Peace, the earn-est of sal-va-tion;
peace, the fruit of for-given sin.


2. Peace, that speaks the heaven-ly giv-er;
peace, to world-ly minds un-known;
peace, so flow-ing as a riv-er
from th'e-ter-nal source a-lone.


3. O God of Sweet Peace be near us,
fix with-in our hearts your home;
With your bright ap-pear-ing cheer us,
in your bless-ed free-dom come.


4. Come with all your re-ve-la-tions,
truth which we so long have sought;
Come with your deep con-so-la-tions;
Peace of God which pass-es thought!

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April 02, 2005

25R Sovereign and Transforming Grace

Original Title: "Sovereign and Transforming Grace," Frederic Henry Hedge (1829), ORIENTIS PARTIBUS, 7.7.7.7., Pierre de Corbeil (died 1222) (second tune GOTTSHALK, 7.7.7.7., (adapted from Louis Moreau Gottshalk)); New Title: Same hymn name, rev. REH (2005), ORIENTIS PARTIBUS. Hedge served as the President of the American Unitarian Association, and edited the 1853 Unitarian hymnal, Hymns for the Church of Christ (Boston). He wrote this hymn for the ordination of a friend. "[J]ust as sin exercised dominion in death, so grace might also exercise dominion . . . leading to eternal life," Romans 5:21. "Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your minds, so that you may discern what is the will of God." Romans 12:2. The hymn appears in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 33 and in The New Century Hymnal as no. 512, both to the tune MANTON.

ORIENTIS PARTIBUS (7.7.7.7.)

1. Sove-reign and trans-form-ing grace,
we in-voke your quick-ening light;
Reign the spir-it of this place,
bless the pur-pose of this hour.

2. Ho-ly and cre-a-tive light,
we in-voke your kind-ling ray;
Dawn up-on our spir-its' night,
as the dark-ness turns to day.


3. To the anx-ious soul im-part
hope, all o-ther hopes a-bove;
Stir the dull and hard-ened heart
with a long-ing and a love.

4. Work in all; In all re-new
day by day the life di-vine.
All our wills to you sub-due,
all our hearts to you in-cline. A-men


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April 03, 2005

26R O Source Divine and Life of All

Original Title: "O Source Divine and Life of All," John Sterling (1839), SONG 34 (GIBBONS), L.M., Orlando Gibbons, Rhythm altered (1623); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. The version of SONG 34 here differs slightly from the version of the tune that appears in Hymns of the Spirit Two. Sterling was born on the Isle of Bute, in Scotland. "For with thee is the fountain of life: in thy light shall we see light. O continue thy lovingkindness unto them that know thee; and thy righteousness to the upright in heart." Psalm 36:10-11 (KJV). The hymn appears neither in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. This is particularly notable given the line in the third stanza, "through the ceaseless web to trace," words so redolent of the so-called "Seventh Principle" of the Unitarian Universalist Association's Principles and Purposes.

SONG 34 (GIBBONS)

1. O Source di-vine, and Life of all,
the Fount of be-ing’s won-drous sea!
Thy depth does ev-ery heart e'er call
that we may see love's dream in thee.

2. We shrink be-fore thy vast a-byss,
where worlds on worlds e-ter-nal brood.
We know thee tru-ly but in this--
That thou be-stow-est all our good.

3. And so, mid bound-less time and space,
O grant us still in thee to dwell,
and through the cease-less web to trace
thy pre-sence work-ing all things well.


4. Nor let thou life’s de-light-ful play
thy truth’s trans-cend-ent vi-sion hide;
Nor strength and glad-ness lead a-stray
from thee, our na-ture’s on-ly guide.

5. Be-stow on all our joy-ous thrills
thy deep-er tones of reve-rent awe:
Make free thy child-ren’s world-ly wills,
and in-cline hearts toward hol-ier law.

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April 04, 2005

27R Where Ancient Forests Round Us Spread

Original Title: "Where Ancient Forests Widely Spread," Andrews Norton (1833), WAINWRIGHT, L.M., Richard Wainwright; New Title: "Where Ancient Forests Round Us Spread," rev. REH (2005), AGINCOURT (DEO GRATIAS), Traditional English Melody (1415). Andrews Norton, an American Unitarian, is famous for having said that Ralph Waldo Emerson’s [Harvard] Divinity School Address represented "the newest form of infidelity." As beloved a figure as Emerson is for many, Norton's provocation takes nothing away from his own place in Unitarian Universalist hymnody. The full form of the hymn was anthologized in 1900 by Edmund Clarence Stedman (1833-1908) in his An American Anthology 1787-1900, as no. 51, where it is called "Hymn for the Dedication of a Church." In that collection, it began "Where ancient forests round us spread," as does the revised version here. Compare 2 Kings 19:22-24. Genesis 28:17, "How awesome is this place! This is none other than the house of God; this is the gate of heaven." The Universe is filled by God, in God "we live and move and have our being." Acts 17:28.; see also Psalm 84. "The Lord has blessed the household of Obededom and all that belongs to him, because of the ark of God," 2 Samuel 6:12, suggesting, as in the lyrics, there are places where "human thought burns clearer" given their chosen status. Tradition has it that the AGINCOURT was written to laud the victory of the English at Normandy. The hymn appears in neither Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

AGINCOURT (DEO GRATIAS) (L.M.)

1. Where an-cient for-ests round us spread,
where bends~the cat'-ract's o-cean fall,
on the lone moun-tain's si-lent head,
there are your tem-ples, God of all!

2. Be-neath the dark-blue, mid-night arch,
whence my~riad suns pour down their rays,
where pla-nets trace their cease-less march,
O Life! we praise you as we gaze.

3. All space is ho-ly, for all space
is filled~by you; And hu-man thought
burns clear-er in some chos-en place,
where your own words of love are taught.

4. May we be taught, and may we know
a faith~your ser-vants knew of old
which on-ward bears through weal and woe,
till Death the gates of heaven un-fold.

5. Nor we a-lone, may those whose brow
shows yet~no trace of hu-man cares,
here-aft-er stand where we do now,
and raise to you still hol-ier prayers!


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April 05, 2005

28R God of the Earth, the Sky, the Sea

Original Title: "God of the Earth, the Sky and the Sea," Samuel Longfellow (1864), WINCHESTER NEW, L.M., Hamburger Musikalisches Handbuch (1690); New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2005), ST. CATHERINE, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Henri F. Hemy (1865). Psalm 24:1-2, "The earth is the Lord's, and all it contains . . . For He has founded it upon the seas, and established it upon the rivers." Genesis 1:27, "[I]n the image of God . . . male and female [God] created them;" see also Genesis 9:6. "God's likeness," 2 Corinthians 3:18, 1 Corinthians 15:49. The Indwelling God, John 15:4. Proverbs 22:2, "The rich and the poor have this in common: the Lord is the maker of them all." The hymn is not contained in The New Century Hymnal, but is found in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 25, to the tune DUKE STREET, L.M.

ST. CATHERINE (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. God of the earth, the sky, the sea,
Mak-er of all a-bove, be-low,
cre-a-tion lives and moves in thee,
thy pre-sent life in all doth flow.
We give thee thanks, thy name we sing;
O Ho-ly One, our praise we bring!

2. Thy love is in the sun-shine’s glow,
thy life is in the quick-ening air;
When light-ning flash-es and storm winds blow,
there is thy power; thy law is there.
We give thee thanks, thy name we sing;
O Ho-ly One, our praise we bring!

3. We feel thy calm at even-ing’s hour,
thy grand-eur in the march of night;
And when thy morn-ing breaks in power,
we hear thy word, “Let there be light.”
We give thee thanks, thy name we sing;
O Ho-ly One, our praise we bring!

4. But high-er far, and far more clear,
thee in our spir-its we be-hold;
Thine im-age and thy-self are there—
Th’in-dwell-ing God, pro-claimed of old!
We give thee thanks, thy name we sing;
O Ho-ly One, our praise we bring!

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April 06, 2005

29R You Hide Within the Lily

Original Title: "He Hides Within the Lily," William Channing Gannett (1873), MUNICH, 7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6., Meiningen Gesangbuch (1693); New Title: "You Hide Within the Lily," rev. REH (2007), KING'S LYNN, 7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6., Traditional English Melody, arranged Ralph Vaughan Williams (1906). "Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not." Matthew 6:28; see also Luke 12:27. "A mortal ... comes up like a flower." Job 14:1-2. It should be noted, of course, that the Song of Songs (the Song of Solomon) discusses flowers and lilies throughout. Micah 6:8 (KJV), "He hath shewed thee, O man, what is good; and what doth the LORD require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?," see also Proverbs 2:13, Proverbs 11:1, 1 Kings 3:11-12, Ecclesiastes 5:8, Jeremiah 22:15. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

KING'S LYNN (7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6.)

1. You hide with-in the li-ly a strong and ten-der care
that wins the earth-born a-toms to glo-ry of the air;
You weave the shin-ing garm-ents un-ceas-ing-ly and still
a-long the qui-et wa-ters, in ni-ches of the hill.

2. We lin-ger at the vi-gil with one who bent the knee
to watch the an-cient li-lies in dis-tant Gal-i-lee;
And still the wor-ship deep-ens and quick-ens in-to new,
and bright-ening down the a-ges God's se-cret thrills us through.

3. O Toi-ler of the li-ly, with you the heart e'er sings;
No leaf that dawns to pe-tal but hints of an-gel wings.
The flower hor-i-zons o-pen, the blos-som vast-er shows;
We hear your wide worlds e-cho, 'See how the li-ly grows.'


4. The yearn-ings of the na-tions, un-fold-ing, thought by thought,
to hol-ier lives are lift-ed, to vi-sions clear are wrought:
May all ad-vance in jus-tice, while e-vils fade and fall,
till cha-os blooms to beau-ty, your pur-pose crown-ing all.

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April 07, 2005

30R Immortal, Invisible, God Only Wise

Original Title: "Immortal, Invisible, God Only Wise," Walter Chalmers Smith (1876), ST. DENIO, 11.11.11.11., Welsh Melody (1839); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2007), same hymn tune. Smith was Scottish. The tune and hymn appear as "Immortal, Invisible" in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 273, with the exception of the final stanza; it appears here. The hymn appears without parental metaphors in The New Century Hymnal as no. 1. The lyrics resonate with some of the images in Psalm 139, as well as Psalm 36:5-6, 103:14-17, and 104:27-39; but most directly the lyrics are based on 1 Timothy 1:17. The webdesigner graciously thanks Haruo for his assistance with the minor revisions to Smith's lyrics below.

ST. DENIO (11.11.11.11.)

1. Im-mort-al, in-vi-si-ble, God on-ly wise,
in light in-ac-ces-si-ble hid from our eyes,
most bles-sèd, most glo-rious, the An-cient of Days,
Al-migh-ty, vic-tor-ious, thy great Name we praise.

2. Un-rest-ing, un-hast-ing, and si-lent as light,
nor want-ing, nor wast-ing, thou rul-est in might;
thy jus-tice, like moun-tains, high soar-ing a-bove
thy clouds, which are foun-tains of good-ness and love.


3. To all, life thou giv-est, to both great and small;
In all life thou liv-est, the true life of all;
We blos-som and flour-ish as leaves on the tree,
and with-er and per-ish— but naught chang-eth thee.

4. Great Fath-er, Great Moth-er, O Light of all light,
thine an-gels a-dore thee, all veil-ing their sight;
All laud we would rend-er; O help us to see
’tis on-ly the splen-dor of light hid-eth thee.


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April 08, 2005

31R Thou Art O God the Life and Light

Original Title: "Thou Art, O God, the Life and Light," Thomas Moore (1816), MACH'S MIT MIR, GOTT, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Johann Hermann Schein (1645), harmony by J. S. Bach; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), OLD 113TH, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Matthäus Greiter (1500-1552). Thomas Moore was a Roman Catholic and Irish Nationalist. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition or in The New Century Hymnal. "With thee is the fountain of life: in thy light shall we see light," Psalm 36:9. "The flowers appear on the earth; the time of singing has come," The Song of Songs 2:12. "Clouds of heaven," Daniel 7:13, Matthew 26:64, Mark 14:62.

OLD 113TH (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. Thou art, O God, the Life and Light
of all this won-drous world we see;
Its glow by day, its smile by night,
are but re-flec-tions caught from thee;
Wher-e'er we turn, thy glo-ries shine:
all things beau-teous and bright are thine.

2. When day, with fare-well beam, de-lays
a-mong the open-ing clouds of even,
and we can al-most think we gaze
through gold-en vis-tas in-to heaven,
those hues, that make the sun's de-cline
so soft, so ra-diant, God, are thine.

3. When budd-ing spring a-round us breathes
thy spir-it warms a fra-grant sigh,
and eve-ry flower the sum-mer wreathes
is born be-neath that kind-ling eye--
Wher-e'er we turn, thy glo-ries shine:
all things beau-teous and bright are thine.

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April 09, 2005

32R For the Beauty of the Earth

Original Title: "For the Beauty of the Earth," Folliott Sandford Pierpoint (1864), DIX, 7.7.7.7.7.7., Conrad Kocher (1838); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Pierpoint was English and Anglican. Isaiah 6:3b, "The Earth is full of [God's] glory." The hymn appears in The New Century Hymnal as no. 28 with the refrain "God of all;" it appears in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 21 with "Source of all." The original in Hymns of the Spirit Two is "Lord of all" in each verse.

DIX (7.7.7.7.7.7.)

1. For the beau-ty of the earth
for the glo-ry of the skies,
for the love which from our birth
ov-er and a-round us lies.
Light of all, to thee~we raise,
this our hymn of grate~ful praise.

2. For the beau-ty of each hour,
of the day and of the night,
hill and vale, and tree and flower,
sun and moon, and stars of light.
Love of all, to thee~we raise,
this our hymn of grate~ful praise.

3. For the joy of ear and eye,
for the heart and mind’s de-light,
for the mys-tic har-mo-ny
link-ing sense to sound and sight.
Life of all, to thee~we raise,
this, our hymn of grate~ful praise.

4. For the joy of hu-man love,
broth-er, sist-er, pa-rent, child,
friends on earth and friends a-bove,
for all gen-tle thoughts and mild.
Lord of all to thee~we raise,
this, our hymn of grate~ful praise. A-men.


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April 10, 2005

33R The Spacious Firmament On High

Original Title: "The Spacious Firmament On High," Joseph Addison (1712), CREATION, L.M.D., Franz Joseph Haydn (1798); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Paraphrase of Psalm 19:1-6. Addison was English and Anglican. The version of CREATION here is in a different key from the version in Hymns of the Spirit Two. The hymn appears in a version remarkably akin to this in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 283; it does not appear in The New Century Hymnal.

CREATION (L.M.D.)

1. The spa-cious fir-ma-ment on high,
with all the blue e-the-real sky,
and spang-led heavens, a shin-ing frame
their great O-rig-i-nal pro-claim.
Th’un-wea-ried sun, from day to day,
does its Cre-a-tor's power dis-play,
and pub-li-shes to eve-ry land
the work of an al-might-y hand.

2. Soon as the eve-ning shades pre-vail
the moon takes up the won-drous tale,
and night-ly to the liste-ning earth
re-peats the sto-ry of its birth;
While all the stars that round it burn
and all the pla-nets in their turn,
con-firm the ti-dings as they roll,
and spread the truth from pole to pole.

3. What though in sol-emn si-lence all
move round the dim ter-res-trial ball?
What though no re-al voice nor sound
a-mid the ra-diant orbs be found?
In rea-son's ear they all re-joice,
and ut-ter forth a glo-rious voice,
for-ev-er sing-ing as they shine,
"The hand that made us is di-vine."


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April 11, 2005

34R Heaven and Earth and Sea and Air

Original Title: "Heaven and Earth and Sea and Air," Joachim Neander (1680), trans. James Drummond Burns, POSEN, 7.7.7.7., Georg Christoph Strattner (1691); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), GOTT SEI DANK, 7.7.7.7., Johann A. Freylinghausen (1704). Psalm 57:7-11, 108:1-5; see also Psalm 19. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but it does appear in a version translated by Madeleine Forrell Marshall (1993) as no. 566, in five stanzas, also to the tune GOTT SEI DANK, in The New Century Hymnal. For Joachim Neander, see the entry under no. 7R.

GOTT SEI DANK (7.7.7.7.)

1. Heaven and earth, and sea and air,
all their mak-er’s praise de-clare;
Wake, my soul, a-wake and sing:
Now thy grate-ful prais-es bring.

2. See the glo-rious orb of day
break-ing through the clouds a-way;
Moon and stars with sil-very light
sing praise through the si-lent night.

3. O God's love hath eve-ry-where
made this earth so rich and fair;
hill and vale and fruit-ful land,
all life bears a ho-ly hand.

4. God, great won-ders work-est thou!
To thy sway all crea-tures bow;
Write thou deep-ly in my heart
what I am, and what thou art.


a. Him-mel, Er-de, Luft und Meer
zeu-gen von des Schöp-fers Ehr;
mei-ne See-le, sin-ge du,
bring auch jetzt dein Lob her-zu.


b. Seht das gro-ße Sonn-en-licht,
wie es durch die Wol-ken bricht;
auch der Mond, der Ster-ne Pracht
jauch-zen Gott bei still-er Nacht.

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April 12, 2005

35R Let the Whole Creation Cry

Original Title: "Let the Whole Creation Cry," Stopford Augustus Brooke, VIENNA, 7.7.7.7., Justin Heinrich Knecht (1799); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Brooke was a 19th Century Irish writer and churchman, first ordained in the Chruch of England, but later he officiated as a Unitarian minister at Bedford chapel, Bloomsbury. Psalm 148:5, "On the glorious splendor of your majesty,and on your wondrous works, I will meditate." (ESV). Neither Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal contains the hymn. The website maintained by St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church includes a paraphrase of Psalm 148 called "The Furthest Depths of Outer Space" with words by Matthew Priest, to the tune KISSLING, 8.8.6.8.8.6., which may be locally reproduced.

VIENNA (7.7.7.7.)

1. Let the whole cre-a-tion cry:
Glo-ry be to God on high!
Sun and moon, up-lift your voice,
night and stars, in God re-joice!


2. Chant out ho-nor, o-cean fair!
Earth, soft rush-ing through the air!
Sun-shine, dark-ness, cloud and storm,
rain and snow high praise per-form.

3. Let the blos-soms of the earth
join the u-ni-ver-sal mirth;
Birds, with morn and dew e-late,
sing with joy at heav-en's gate.


4. All souls on the side of right,
pro-phets speak-ing words of might;
Po-ets, fight-ers, ar-ti-sans:
Raise the anth-em once a-gain!

5. And let chil-dren's hap-py hearts
in this wor-ship bear their parts:
Ho-ly, ho-ly, ho-ly, cry,
Glo-ry be to God on high!

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April 13, 2005

36R O God Whose Smile Is In the Sky

Original Title: "O God Whose Smile Is In the Sky," John Haynes Holmes (1907), MARTYRDOM, C.M., Hugh Wilson, adapted by H. A. Smith (1825); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. A graduate of Harvard, Holmes first served as minister of the Unitarian Third Congregational Church, Dorchester, Massachusetts. In 1907, he became junior minister at the Church of the Messiah in New York City (now known as the Community Church, Unitarian Universalist). "What a relief it is to see your friendly smile. It is like seeing the smile of God," Genesis 33:10. "May the Lord smile on you and be gracious to you," Numbers 6:25. "Come unto me . . . and I will give you rest," Matthew 11:28. The hymn is not in The New Century Hymnal, nor is it in Singing the Living Tradition.

MARTYRDOM (C.M.)

1. O God, whose smile is in the sky,
whose path is in the sea,
once more from earth’s tu-mul-tuous strife
to you we turn glad-ly.

2. Now all the myr-iad sounds of earth
in so-lemn still-ness die;
while wind and wave u-nite to chant
their an-them to the sky.

3. We come as those with toil far spent
who crave your rest and peace,
and from the care and fret of life
would find in you re-lease.

4. Su-stain-er, soothe all troubl-ed thought,
dis-pel all id-le fear;
O purge each heart of se-cret sin,
and ba-nish ev-ery care.

5. Un-til, as shine up-on the sea
the si-lent stars a-bove,
there shines up-on our trust-ing souls
the light of your own love.

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April 14, 2005

37R Thou Rulest, God, the Lights On High

Original Title: "Thou Rulest, God, the Lights On High," Theodore Chickering Williams (1911), MELCOMBE, L.M., Samuel Webbe (1782); New Title: Same hymn tune, rev. REH (2006), ERHALT UNS, HERR, L.M., Geisliche Lieder (Wittenberg 1543). "[W]isdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, willing to yield, full of mercy." James 3:17. "Does not Wisdom call, and does not understanding raise her voice?" Proverbs 8:1; see also Proverbs 1:20-25. "O Lord, how manifold are your works! In wisdom you have made them all; the earth is full of your creatures," Psalm 104:24. Williams served as pastor of All Souls Church (Unitarian) in New York City for 13 years. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

ERHALT UNS, HERR (L.M.)

1. Thou rul-est, God, the lights on high;
Sun, moon and stars thy ser-vants be.
Yet eve-ry glo-ry of the sky
is bright-er still when I have thee.

2. How vast the mar-vel of the mind,
how far the beams of rea-son go!
Yet all wis-dom of hu-man-kind
burns deep-er still when thee I know.


3. Wher-e'er I look is light and joy:
A bloom-ing flower, an eag-le's wing;
their sin-less ju-bi-lee em-ploy,
and to thy praise full tri-bute bring.

4. Thy gifts to us be-yond com-pare,
like roy-al crowns and em-blems shine;
yet bring us nev-er to des-pair
when we hold these grand gifts as thine.


5. De-light and wis-dom, peace and power,
a heart of hope, se-rene and free,
through life's dim dream and tran-sient hour
I find, O God, tru-ly in thee.


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April 15, 2005

38R The Harp at Nature's Advent Strung

Original Title: "The Harp at Nature's Advent Strung," John Greenleaf Whittier, EVAN, C.M., William Henry Havergal, arranged by Lowell Mason (1850); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), LLANGLOFLAN, 8.6.8.6., Welsh Hymn Melody. Whittier was an anti-slavery Quaker and poet, who was secretary of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Though born in Boston, he lived in Philadelphia where he edited the Pennsylvania Freeman. The complete, original poem, called "The Worship of Nature" contains ten verses, rather than the six below, or the five in Hymns of the Spirit Two and the five in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 74 (It is not contained in The New Century Hymnal). Though anthologized in The Complete Poetical Works of John Greenleaf Whittier, (Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1894), the poem was first published in 1867. "All the earth . . . make music to the Lord with the harp, with the harp and the sound of singing, . . . Let the sea resound, and everything in it, the world, and all who live in it." Psalm 98:4-7 "You have kept the good wine until now," John 2:10, Nehemiah 8:10.

LLANGLOFLAN (8.6.8.6.)

1. The harp at Na-ture's ad-vent strung
has never ceas-ed to play;
the song the stars of morn-ing sung
has ne-ver died a-way.
And prayer is made, and praise is given,
by all things near and far;
the o-cean look-eth up to heaven,
and mirr-ors eve-ry star.

2. Its waves are kneel-ing on the strand,
as kneels the hu-man knee,
their white locks bow-ing to the sand,
the priest-hood of the sea!
The green earth sends its in-cense up
from many a moun-tain shrine;
from fold-ed leaf and de-wy cup
and pours a sacr-ed wine.

3. The blue sky is the tem-ple's arch,
its tran-sept earth and air,
the mu-sic of its star-ry march
the cho-rus of a prayer.
So Na-ture keeps the re-verent frame
with which the years be-gan,
and all the signs and voi-ces shame
the prayer-less heart a-gain.

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April 16, 2005

39R There Is a Book

Original Title: "There Is a Book (Who Runs May Read)," John Keble (1819), DEDHAM (C.M.), William Gardiner (1812); New Title: "There Is a Book (Which All May Read)," rev. REH and Jim Clark (2005), KINGSFOLD (8.6.8.6.), arr. Ralph Vaughan Williams (1906). Keble was English, an exponent of the Oxford Movement, an Anglo-Catholic current within the Church of England. Gardiner and Vaughan Williams were both English. The original line from the hymn "who runs may read," is nothing if not obscure to modern speakers of English; it comes from Habakkuk: "Yahweh answered me, 'Write the vision, and make it plain on tablets, that he who runs may read it.'" Habakkuk 2:2. At least one modern reading renders it this way: "Then the Lord replied: 'Write down the revelation and make it plain on tablets so that a herald may run with it.'" The latter suggests that the purpose of running with the revelation in hand is so that the herald may read it to those whom he meets along the way; the lyrics here have been recast to capture this sense of the words in even broader terms-- that revelation is available to all, without mediation, and likewise may be interpreted by all. "The word of God is living and active," Hebrews 4:12. "They read from the book, from the law of God," Nehemiah 8:8 (NRSV). Those wishing to limit the hymn to singing about the Hebrew scriptures, given the grounding of the original quotation in Habakkuk, may wish to substitute "Christ" with "Love."

KINGSFOLD (8.6.8.6.)

1. There is a book, which all may read,
which heaven-ly truth im-parts;
and all the tools its read-ers need,
broad minds and lov-ing hearts.
The lives of proph-ets here be-low,
and works of Christ all 'round,
are pa-ges in that book to show
how God is free-ly found.

2. The glor-ious sky, em-brac-ing all,
is like the Mak-er's love,
en-com-pass-ing the great and small,
with-in and high a-bove.
The dew of heaven is like your grace,
it steals in si-lence down;
But where it lights the fa-vored place,
its rich fruits spell re-nown.


3. The rag-ing sea, the roar-ing wind,
your bound-less power dis-play.
But in the gent-ler breeze un-dinned:
your spir-it's free-ing way.
To us you give [the faith] to doubt,
and love this earth with care;
Give us a heart to seek you out,
and read you eve-ry-where.

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April 17, 2005

40R Seek Not Afar For Beauty

Original Title: "Seek Not Afar For Beauty," Minot Judson Savage, LANGRAN, 10.10.10.10, James Langran (1863); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), YORKSHIRE, 10.10.10.10.10.10., John Wainwright (1750). Langran and Wainwright were both English Anglicans; Savage was a 19th Century American, associated at various times with Congregational and Unitarian churches. The world-weary Hebrew prophet Ecclesiastes is faintly echoed here, the idea being that there is "nothing new under the sun," such that it is in life's simple pleasures where we might find meaning and transcendence: "What do mortals get from all the toil and strain with which they toil under the sun? For all their days are full of pain, and their work is a vexation; even at night their minds do not rest. This also is vanity." Ecclesiastes 2:2-23. "He has made everything suitable for its time; moreover he has put a sense of past and future into their minds, yet they cannot find out what God has done from the beginning to the end. I know that there is nothing better for them than to be happy and enjoy themselves as long as they live; moreover, it is God’s gift that all should eat and drink and take pleasure in all their toil." Ecclesiastes 3:11-13. Three verses make up a version that appears to COOLINGE in Singing the Living Tradition; the hymn does not appear in The New Century Hymnal.

YORKSHIRE (10.10.10.10.10.10)

1. Seek not a-far for beau-ty. Lo! it glows
in dew-wet grass-es all a-bout your feet;
in birds, in sun-shine, child-ren's fac-es sweet,
in stars and moun-tain sum-mits topped with snows.
Go not a-broad for hap-pi-ness. For see,
it is a flow-er that here blooms free-ly.


2. Bring love and jus-tice home, and then no more
will you won-der where peace and joy are taught.
Dream not of no-ble ser-vice else-where wrought.
The sim-ple du-ty now waits at your door;
God's voice speaks ev-er hol-i-er com-mands:
Life's saint-ly deeds are done by com-mon hands.

3. In won-der-work-ings, or some bush a-flame,
we look for Truth, and fan-cy it con-cealed;
But in earth's com-mon things, Life stands re-vealed,
while grass and flowers and stars spell out God's Name.
Seek not a-far for beau-ty. Lo! for see
it is a flow-er that here blooms free-ly.

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April 19, 2005

41R O God, Your Wonders

Original Title: "Father, Thy Wonders Do Not Singly Stand," Jones Very (1839, 1846), OLD FIRST, 10.10.10.10., later form of melody in Genevan Psalter (1542); New Title: "O God, Your Wonders (Do Not Singly Stand)," rev. REH (2007), TOULON, 10.10.10.10., abridged from Genevan Psalter (1551). The hymn is based on two poems, both called "The Spirit-Land," one written in 1839 and which begins "Father, thy wonders do not singly stand; the second, written in 1846 of the same title, begins "Open our eyes . . ." Very was a Unitarian minister, and Transcendentalist poet, contemporary of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, who is said to have "gone mad" at an early age. "Spirit land" seems to be an invocation (albeit infrequent) of heaven even in conventional Christian hymns. For example, Samuel Greg's 1854 hymn, "Stay, Master, Upon This Heavenly Hill," entreats Jesus to "let us linger a little longer . . . and catch a glimpse into spirit land." Very seems, by contrast, to place this spirit land not somewhere distant or obscure, but rather somewhere "richly . . . displayed," in an "enchanted land" that lies ever around us. God gave us inspiration and intuition; Very seems to tell us we should not waste these precious gifts that are "at hand;" that is, available to us. Such is the language Jesus used too in speaking of the Kingdom of God, in images so often misunderstood by his followers. Matthew 3:2; 4:17; Mark 1:15. "Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?,” Mark 10:17. "When they had brought their boats to shore, they left everything and followed him," Luke 5:11 (NRSV). The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition or in The New Century Hymnal.

TOULON (10.10.10.10.)

1. O God! your won-ders do not sing-ly stand,
nor far re-moved where feet have sel-dom strayed;
A-round us ev-er lies th'en-chant-ed land;
Rich mar-vels to your child-ren thus dis-played.

2. In find-ing you are all things round us found;
In los-ing you are all things lost be-side;
Ears have we but in vain strange voic-es sound,
and to our eyes the vi-sion is de-nied.


3. O-pen our eyes that we that world may see,
o-pen our ears that we your voice may hear,
and in the spir-it-land may ev-er be,
and feel your pre-sence with us al-ways near.

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April 20, 2005

42R Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee

Original Title: "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee," Henry Van Dyke (1908), JOY, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., arranged from Ludwig van Beethoven; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Van Dyke was an American Presbyterian. The hymn tune is known as HYMN TO JOY in Singing the Living Tradition; no. 29 is a three-verse version of "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee;" no. 327 in the 1993 hymn is entitled "Joy, Thou Goddess," with original German lyrics for two stanzas of "Freude, schöner Götterfunken." The latter hymn, by Friedrich Schiller, constitutes the "original" lyrics insofar as they inspired Beethoven's composition. The New Century Hymnal has four verses (without sibling references) as no. 4, "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore You." See Psalm 145:10, "All your works shall give thanks to you," see also Psalm 71:23; Isaiah 49:13, "Sing for joy, O heavens, and exult, O earth; break forth, O mountains, into singing!"

JOY (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.)

1. Joy-ful, joy-ful, we a-dore thee, God of glo-ry, God of love;
Hearts un-fold like flowers be-fore thee, open-ing to the sun a-bove.
Melt the clouds of sin and sad-ness; drive the dark* of doubt a-way;
Giv-er of im-mort-al glad-ness, fill us with the light of day!


2. All thy works with joy sur-round thee, earth and heaven re-flect thy rays,
stars and an-gels sing a-round thee, cent-er of un-brok-en praise.
Field and for-est, vale and moun-tain, flow-ery mead-ow, flash-ing sea,
sing-ing bird and flow-ing foun-tain call us to re-joice in thee.

3. Thou art giv-ing and for-giv-ing, ev-er bless-ing, ev-er blessed;
Well-spring of the joy of liv-ing, o-cean depth of hap-py rest!
Lov-ing Sove-reign, Moth-er, Fath-er, all who live in love are thine;
teach us how to love each oth-er, lift us to the joy di-vine.

4. Mor-tals, join the hap-py chor-us, which the morn-ing stars beg-an;
Christ our Bro-ther reigns a-mongst us; Sis-ter Wis-dom seals the plan.
Ev-er sing-ing, march we on-ward, vic-tors in the midst of strife,
Joy-ful mus-ic leads us sun-ward in the tri-umph song of life.

*or 'storms'

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April 21, 2005

43R O God, Our Dwelling Place

Original Title: "O God, Our Dwelling Place," Lewis Gilbert Wilson (1912), ST. EDMUND, 6.4.6.4.6.6.6.4., Arthur Seymour Sullivan (1872); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), DOWN AMPNEY, 6.6.11.6.6.11., Ralph Vaughan Williams (1906). Lewis Gilbert Wilson was an American Unitarian. He wrote about Hopedale, Massachusetts, a 19th cenutry communal experiment in "Practical Christianity," founded by Universalist Adin Ballou. He likewise edited "The Christian Doctrine of Non-Resistance," written by Adin Ballou and Leo Tolstoi. Arthur Seymour Sullivan, an Englishman, was one-half of the musical team of Gilbert and Sullivan. The hymn appears in neither Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. The hymn echoes many psalms, including in the last stanza Psalm 51:10, 15, "Create in me a pure heart, O God, and renew a steadfast spirit within me. . . . O Lord, open my lips, and my mouth will declare your praise." Verse 2 resonates with Psalm 36:9, "For with you is the fountain of life." Verse One, 'From his dwelling place [God] watches all who live on earth . . . the eyes of the Lord are on those who fear him, on those whose hope is in his unfailing love," see Psalm 33:14, 18; Psalm 148. Psalm 32:7, "You are a hiding place for me; you preserve me from trouble."

DOWN AMPNEY (6.6.11.6.6.11.)

1. O God, our dwell-ing place,
our times are ev-er thine;
Through all our years we trace love's large de-sign.
Lure us to high de-sire
and with ce-les-tial fire
in all our souls in-spire thy love di-vine.

2. O Fount, un-spent and pure,
the faint-ing hu-man soul
thou canst from death re-store, its grief con-sole.
Health thou a-lone canst give;
O let all hearts re-ceive!
Bid us a-rise and live, by thee made whole.

3. Bless thou our thought of thee,
to err-or weak-ly prone;
in hol-ier song may we thy name en- throne.
By widen-ing du-ties cast
with-in thy pur-pose vast,
may we know thee at last as we are known.

4. In ser-vice strong and fair
forth may we brave-ly go;
Thy grand realm to pre-pare, thy truth to know.
For tem-ples let us raise;
Pure hearts that sing thy praise;
And un-to end-less days thy glo-ry show.

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April 22, 2005

44R True Stewards, Earth

Original Title: "Thou, Earth, Art Ours, and Ours to Keep," Mary Howitt, GASTORIUS, 8.8.8.8.8., adapted from Severus Gastorius (1681); New Title: "True Stewards, Earth" rev. REH (2007), SUSSEX CAROL, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Traditional English melody, arranged by Ralph Vaughn Williams (1919). Mary Howitt was an English Quaker and poet, who wrote extensively on nature themes. Perhaps her best-known poem is "The Spider and the Fly." Here the lyrics clearly echo Genesis: "And God said, Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb yielding seed, and the fruit tree yielding fruit after his kind, whose seed is in itself, upon the earth: and it was so. And the earth brought forth grass, and herb yielding seed after his kind, and the tree yielding fruit, whose seed was in itself, after his kind: and God saw that it was good," Genesis 1:11-22; see also Genesis 1:29, Genesis 8:22, Genesis 27:28. In the Christian scriptures, seed and harvest are sometimes metaphors for the God's word, e.g., Luke 8:11, Matthew 13:3, 32, John 12:24, see also Luke 13:6-9 (the parable of the fig treet). That the earth is "ours" is echoed in the Psalms, e.g., Psalm 115:16; the likeness of "darkness and light" in Psalm 139:12; God gives grain/corn in Psalm 65:9. Trees and wind are mentioned specifically in Isaiah 7:2; the first and latter rain in Deuteronomy 11:14. The hymn appears in neither Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal.

SUSSEX CAROL (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. True stew-ards, earth, we are for thee,
who in faith la-bor in thy reign;
the green-ing grass, the corn, the tree,
spring-time and har-vest come from thee,
the ear-ly and the lat-ter rain,
the ear-ly and the lat-ter rain.

2. O earth, the earth, thy sum-mer-time,
fresh with the dews, the sun-shine bright,
with gold-en clouds in eve-ning hours,
with sing-ing birds and fra-grant flowers,
crea-tures of beau-ty and de-light,
crea-tures of beau-ty and de-light.

3. Thou, earth, our earth, when light is dim,
and leaf-less stands the state-ly tree,
when from the north the fierce winds blow,
when fall-eth fast the mant-ling snow.
O earth, thou speak-est still to me,
O earth, thou speak-est still to me.

4. The earth is yours and mine, all life!
Ours is all worlds, all suns that shine,
sha-dow and light, and life and death,
what-e'er all space in-ha-bi-teth:
Life's im-age bears the true di-vine,
Life's im-age bears the true di-vine.

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April 25, 2005

45R Morning, So Fair to See

Original Title: "Morning, So Fair to See," Vincent Brown Silliman (1934), ST. ELIZABETH, 6.6.9.6.6.8., Silesian Folksong; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. ST. ELIZABETH is also unhappily (albeit for fanciful reasons) known as CRUSADER'S HYMN. Silliman was a Unitarian and humanist, and one of the editors of the Hymns for the Celebration of Life, published in 1964, the first hymnal produced by the Unitarian Universalist Association after consolidation in 1961. As the giver of the "Berry Street Address" at UUA's 1977 General Assembly in Ithaca, Silliman said "hymn tinkering is a long-standing practice. Some tinkers have spread so widely that the original is all but forgotten." Another recast version of Silliman's hymn can be found in Singing the Living Tradition, at no. 42; it does not appear in The New Century Hymnal. Morning's beauty is a topic in Genesis; e.g., Genesis 1:5-31. Morning is a time when people went to the temple; e.g., Luke 21:38, John 8:2; morning also bespeaks glory; e.g., Song of Solomon 6:10 ("Who is she that looketh forth as the morning, fair as the moon, clear as the sun"); see also Isaiah 58:8.

ST. ELIZABETH (6.6.9.6.6.8.)

1. Morn-ing, so fair to see,*
Night, veiled in mys-ter-y,
Glo-rious the earth and res-plen-dent skies!
Pil-grims, we march a-long,
Sing-ing our Pil-grim song,
As through an earth-ly par-a-dise.

2. Green are the grow-ing trees;
Blue are the flash-ing seas;
Glo-rious each won-der the sea-sons bring.
Bright-er is faith's sur-mise
shin-ing in Pil-grims' eyes:
Bright-er the com-mon-weal we sing.

3. Age af-ter age we rise,
'Neath the e-ter-nal skies,
In-to the light from the sha-dowed past:
Still shall our Pil-grim song,
Bou-yant and brave and strong,
Re-sound while life and moun-tains last.

*Or 'shines so brightly.' A version of the hymn less reticient about the word "fair," and thus much closer to the original text, might read as follows:

1. Morn-ing, so fair to see,
Night, veiled in mys-ter-y,
Glo-rious the earth and res-plen-dent skies!
Pil-grims, we march a-long,
Sing-ing our Pil-grim song,
As through an earth-ly par-a-dise.

2. Fair are the verdant trees;
fair are the flash-ing seas;
Fair is each won-der the sea-sons bring.
Fair-er is faith's sur-mise
shin-ing in Pil-grims' eyes:
Fair-er the com-mon-weal we sing.

3. Age af-ter age we rise,
'Neath the e-ter-nal skies,
In-to the light from the sha-dowed past:
Still shall our Pil-grim song,
Bou-yant and brave and strong,
Re-sound while life and moun-tains last.

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April 26, 2005

46R God of All Majesty and Might

Original Name: "Lord of All Majesty and Might," George Wallace Briggs (1933), VATER UNSER, 8.8.8.8.8.8., later form of melody in V. Schumann’s Gesangbuch (1539), harmony by J.S. Bach; New Name: "God of All Majesty and Might," rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Briggs was an English Anglican priest, born in 1875. The title echoes "In thine hand is power and might," 1 Chronicles 29:12; the "unfathomed deep" of the lyrics seems to correlate with Psalm 95:4, "In [God's] hand are the deep places of the earth." The last verse seems to take from Paul in 1 Corinthians 13:9, "for we know in part, and we prophesy in part." The Imago Dei is echoed in verse four, from Genesis 1:27. The discussion of wisdom in verse 2 resonantes with the passages "Behold, God is mighty, and despiseth not any: he is mighty in strength and wisdom," Job 36:5 and "God only wise," Romans 16:27a. The hymn appears in neither Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal.

VATER UNSER (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. God of all maj~es-ty and might,
Whose pres-ence fills th'un-fathom-ed deep,
Where-in un-count-ed worlds of light
through count-less a-ges vi-gil keep;
E-ter-nal One, can such as we,
Frail mor-tal souls, know aught of thee?

2. Be-yond all know~ledge thou art wise,
With wis-dom that trans-cends all thought;
Yet still we seek with strain-ing eyes,
Yea, seek as our an-ces-tors sought;
Nor will we from the quest de-part,
Til we shall know thee as thou art.


3. Frail though our form,~and brief our day,
Our mind has bridged the gulf of years,
Our pu-ny ba-lan-ces can weigh,
The mag-ni-tude of star-ry spheres:
With-in us is e-ter-ni-ty;
Whence come this, O God, but from thee?


4. For when thy wond~rous works we scan,
And mind gives ans-wer back to mind,
Thine im-age shines in the hu-man;
And seek-ing we shall sure-ly find.
Mor-tals, our her-i-tage we claim;
Shall not thy child-ren know thy name?


5. We know in part;~e-nough we know
to walk with thee, and walk a-right;
And thou shalt guide us as we go,
And lead us in-to full-er light,
Til when we stand be-fore thy throne,
We know at last as we are known. A-men.

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April 27, 2005

47R Come Thou Almighty Will!

Original Title: "Come Thou Almighty Will," Hymns of the Spirit One (1864), ITALIAN HYMN, 6.6.4.6.6.4., adapted from Felice Giardini (1769); New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Hymns of the Spirit One (1864) was edited by Samuel Longfellow. The hymn recites numerous names and titles for the spirit of God; "Almighty Will," echoing the spirit that blowest "where it listeth," John 3:8 (KJV); "Calm of faith's confidence," recalling the title "Comforter" from John 4:16 and John 15:26; "most Tender Love," suggesting the "Love of God" in 1 John 4:9 and the equivalence of "God is Love" from 1 John 14:16; see also Romans 5:5, "Light serene," remembering too that "God is light," 1 John 1:5; Psalm 27:1. "Quickener," as quicken is now in most translations "revive," suggests the "giver of life" from the historic creeds, or the "spirit of life," Romans 8:2 (NRSV); Revelations 11:11 (KJV) and the "breath of the almighty," Job 33:4. The hymn appears in neither Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal.

ITALIAN HYMN (6.6.4.6.6.6.4.)

1. Come, thou Al-might-y Will!
Our faint-ing bos-soms fill
with thy great power:
Strength of our good in-tents,
our tempt-ed hour's de-fense,
calm of faith's con-fi-dence,
come, in this hour!

2. Come, thou most ten-der Love!
With-in our spir-its move,
their sweet-est guest:
Ex-alt each low de-sire,
trans-form-ing pas-sion's fire,
to deeds of love in-spire,
Quicken-er and Rest!

3. Come, Light ser-ene and still!
Our gloom-y spir-its fill
with thy clear day:
Guide of the fee-ble sight,
Star of grief's low-est night,
re-veal the path of right,
show us thy way! A-men.


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April 28, 2005

48R Spirit of God, Descend Upon My Heart

Original Title: "Spirit of God, Descend Upon My Heart," George Croly (1854), first tune, SONG 12, 10.10.10.10., rhythmed altered from Orlando Gibbons, second tune, MORECAMBE, 10.10.10.10., ascribed to Federick Cook Atkinson (1870); New Title: Same hymn title, no changes to lyrics, SONG 12, 10.10.10.10. Croly was a graduate of Dublin University; he later took holy orders. He left Ireland in 1810 for London. His works include Scenes from Scripture and Other Poems (1851) and Psalms and Hymns for Public Worship (1854). The original version consisted of five verses; the fourth verse was not included in Hymns of the Spirit Two. "Live by the spirit, I say ... If you are led by the spirit, you are not subject to the law," Galatians 5:16; see also 18-25. "Your memorable sayings are proverbs of ashes, your defenses are defenses of clay," Job 13:12. Matthew 3:16, "And Jesus, when he was baptized, went up straightway out of the water: and, lo, the heavens were opened unto him, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove, and lighting upon him," see also John 1:32; Matthew 22:37, Acts 8:17. Proverbs 1:28, "Then shall they call upon me, but I will not answer; they shall seek me early, but they shall not find me." The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but does appear, in revised form in five stanzas, to the tune MORECAMBE, as no. 290, in The New Century Hymnal.

SONG 22 (10.10.10.10.)

1. Spir-it of God, de-scend up-on my heart;
Wean it from earth; through all its puls-es move;
Stoop to my weak-ness, might-y as thou art;
And make me love thee as I ought to love.

2. I ask no dream, no pro-phet ec-sta-sies,
no sud-den rend-ing of the veil of clay,
no an-gel vi-si-tant, no open-ing skies;
But take the dim-ness of my soul a-way.

3. Teach me to feel that thou art al-ways nigh;
Teach me the strug-gles of the soul to bear.
To check the ris-ing doubt, the re-bel sigh,
teach me the pa-tience of un-an-swered prayer.

4. Teach me to love thee as thine an-gels love,
one ho-ly pas-sion fill-ing all my frame;
The kind-ling of the heaven-de-scend-ed dove,
My heart an al-tar, and thy love the flame. A-men.

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April 30, 2005

49R Come, Mighty Spirit, Penetrate

Original Title: "Come, Mighty Spirit, Penetrate," Horatius Bonar (1861), TALLIS' ORDINAL, C.M., Thomas Tallis (1567); New Title: Same hymn title, no changes to lyrics, same hymn tune. Bonar (1808-1889) was a Presbyterian, who eventually joined the Free Church of Scotland. He wrote of 600 hymns, and thus is aptly called "the prince of Scottish hymnwriters." At his memorial service, it was said "His hymns were writ­ten in very var­ied cir­cum­stances, some­times timed by the tink­ling brook that bab­bled near him; some­times at­tuned to the or­dered tramp of the ocean, whose crest­ed waves broke on the beach by which he wan­dered; some­times set to the rude mu­sic of the rail­way train that hurried him to the scene of du­ty; some­times mea­sured by the si­lent rhy­thm of the mid­night stars that shone above him." 2 Timothy 1:7 (NRSV), "God did not give us a spirit of cowardice, but rather a spirit of power and of love and of self-discipline." "Uphold me with thy free spirit," Psalm 51:12 (KJV). "Spirit of might," Isaiah 11:2. Psalm 68:9, "Thou, O God, didst send a plentiful rain, whereby thou didst confirm thine inheritance, when it was weary," see also Psalm 72:6, Hebrews 6:7, Psalms 104:8. Psalms 4:6, "Lift thou up the light of thy countenance upon us," see also Isaiah 2:5. Matthew 5:8, "Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God." Psalm 51:10, "Create in me a clean heart, O God; and renew a right spirit within me." The hymn is not included in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

TALLIS' ORDINAL (C.M.)

1. Come, Migh-ty Spir-it, pe-ne-trate
this heart and soul of mine,
and my whole be-ing with thy grace
per-vade, O Life Di-vine!

2. As this clear air sur-rounds the earth
thy grace a-round me roll
as the fresh light per-vades the air,
so pierce and fill my soul.

3. As from these clouds drops down in love
the pre-cious sum-mer rain,
so from thy-self pour down the flood
that fresh-ens all a-gain.

4. Thus life with-in our life-less hearts
shall make its glad a-bode,
and we shall shine in beau-teous light,
filled with the light of God. A-men.

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May 01, 2005

50R Love Divine, All Loves Excelling

Original Title: "Love Divine, All Loves Excelling," Charles Wesley (1747), first tune, HYFRYDOL, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., Rowland Hugh Pritchard (1855), second tune, BEECHER, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., John Zundel (1870); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), HYFRYDOL, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7. The hymn first appeared in Hymns For Those That Seek, and Those That Have Redemption (1747). Charles Wesley, father of the Methodist movement, who wrote over 6,500 hymns, is said to have been inspired by the song "The Song of Venus" from John Dryden's play King Arthur. The hymn originally had four verses, and suggested that one could be completely cleansed of sin in this life. This prompted Charles' brother John Wesley to change the lyrics. It appeared with two verses only in Hymns of the Spirit Two (1937). In that version, "Jesus, thou art all compassion," became "Father, thou art all compassion." Here "Wisdom" has been substituted; see 50S for a version in which "Jesus" has been restored. Below, as in 50S, lines from the original third and fourth verses have been combined to create a third verse. Charles Wesley himself might rank "Wisdom" at least over "Father" as here, explaining in his Notes on Proverbs that "Christ, under the name of Wisdom, invites us to his entertainment;" i.e., "Wisdom has built her house, she has hewn her seven pillars . . . 'Come, eat of my bread, and drink of the wine I have mixed,'" Proverbs 9:1, 5. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition (that said, the tune HYFRYDOL should be well known in most Unitarian Universalist congregations all the same, as it is used for no. 140, "Hail the Glorious Golden City," and no. 166, "Years Are Coming," and no. 207, "Earth Was Given As a Garden"). The hymn does appear in The New Century Hymnal to the tune BEECHER (though HYFRYDOL is suggested as an alternative) as no. 43, with four stanzas. 1 John 4:16, "God is Love," Malachi 3:1, "The messenger of the covenant in whom you delight—indeed, he is coming, says the Lord of hosts." "And all of us ... seeing the glory of the Lord as though reflected in a mirror, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another," 2 Corinthians 3:18. 2 Corinthians 5:17, "So if anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation." "All you need to remember is that God will never let you down; he'll never let you be pushed past your limit; he'll always be there to help you come through it," 1 Corinthians 10:13b (The Message). "[N]ew creation," 2 Corinthians 5:17.

HYFRYDOL (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.)

1. Love di-vine, all loves ex-cell-ing,
Joy of heaven to earth come down;
Fix in us a hum-ble dwell-ing;
All your faith-ful mer-cies crown!
Wis-dom, you are all com-pas-sion;
Pure, un-bound-ed love im-part;
Vis-it us with your sal-va-tion;
En-ter eve-ry trem-bling heart.

2. Breathe, O breathe your lov-ing spir-it,
In-to eve-ry trou-bled breast!
Let us all in you in-her-it;
Let us find your prom-ised rest.
We would you be al-ways bless-ing,
Al-pha and O-me-ga be;
We would praise you with-out ceas-ing;
Set our hearts at li-ber-ty.

3. Come, E-ter-nal, to de-liv-er,
Let us all your life re-ceive;
Gra-cious-ly re-turn and ne-ver,
Ne-ver more your tem-ples leave.
Her-ald-ing a new cre-a-tion;
Heaven and earth take now their place;
Let us see your great sal-va-tion;
Lost in won-der, love, and praise.

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May 02, 2005

50S Love Divine, All Loves Excelling

Original Title: "Love Divine, All Loves Excelling," Charles Wesley (1747), first tune, HYFRYDOL, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., Rowland Hugh Pritchard (1855), second tune, BEECHER, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., John Zundel (1870); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), BEECHER, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7. The hymn first appeared in Hymns For Those That Seek, and Those That Have Redemption (1747). Charles Wesley, father of the Methodist movement, who wrote over 6,500 hymns, is said to have been inspired by the song "The Song of Venus" from John Dryden's play King Arthur. The hymn originally had four verses, and suggested that one could be completely cleansed of sin in this life. This prompted Charles' brother John Wesley to change the lyrics. It appeared with two verses only in Hymns of the Spirit Two (1937). In that version, "Jesus, thou art all compassion," became "Father, thou art all compassion." Here, "Jesus" has been restored, and lines from the original third and fourth verses have been combined to create a third verse. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition (that said, the tune HYFRYDOL should be well known in most Unitarian Universalist congregations all the same, as it is used for no. 140, "Hail the Glorious Golden City," and no. 166, "Years Are Coming," and no. 207, "Earth Was Given As a Garden"). The hymn does appear in The New Century Hymnal to the tune BEECHER (though HYFRYDOL is suggested as an alternative) as no. 43, with four stanzas. 1 John 4:16, "God is Love," Malachi 3:1, "The messenger of the covenant in whom you delight—indeed, he is coming, says the Lord of hosts." "And all of us ... seeing the glory of the Lord as though reflected in a mirror, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another," 2 Corinthians 3:18. 2 Corinthians 5:17, "So if anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation." Luke 7:13, "Jesus had compassion on her;" see also Matthew 14:14; Matthew 20:29-34. "All you need to remember is that God will never let you down; he'll never let you be pushed past your limit; he'll always be there to help you come through it," 1 Corinthians 10:13b (The Message). "[N]ew creation," 2 Corinthians 5:17.

BEECHER (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.)

1. Love Di-vine, all loves ex-cell-ing,
Joy of heaven to earth come down;
Fix in us a hum-ble dwell-ing;
All your faith-ful mer-cies crown!
Jes-us, life of all com-pas-sion,
Pure un-bound-ed love all taught;
Let that love be our sal-va-tion,
En-ter-ing each trem-bling heart.

2. Breathe, O breathe a lov-ing spir-it,
In-to eve-ry trou-bled breast!
Let us all in you in-her-it;
Let us find a prom-ised rest.
Give to us your love of lov-ing,
Al-pha and O-me-ga be;
End of faith, as its be-gin-ing;
Set our hearts at li-ber-ty.

3. Come, al-migh-ty to de-liv-er,
Let us all your life re-ceive;
Gra-cious-ly re-turn and ne-ver,
Ne-ver more your tem-ples leave.
Her-ald-ing a new cre-a-tion;
Heaven and earth take now their place;
Let us see that great sal-va-tion;
Lost in won-der, love, and praise.

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50T Sólo excelsa, verdad divina

Título original: "Sólo excelso, amor divino," traducción de "Love Divine, All Loves Excelling," Charles Wesley (1747), traductores, Elida G. Falcón, Juanita R. Ballock, Luis Olivieri, BEECHER, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., John Zundel; Título nuevo: "Sólo excelsa, verdad divina," alterado REH (2006), HYFRYDOL, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., Rowland Hugh Pritchard (1855). El original aparece con cuatro estribillos en El Himnario (1998) de la Iglesia Episcopal de los Estados Unidos como no. 212, con la tonada BEECHER. Proverbios 8:12, 14-15 (LBLA), "Yo, la Sabiduría, habito con la prudencia, y he hallado conocimiento y discreción . . . Mío es el consejo y la prudencia, yo soy la inteligencia, el poder es mío. Por mí reinan los reyes, y los gobernantes decretan justicia."

HYFRYDOL (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.)

1. Só-lo ex-cel-sa, ver-dad di-vi-na,
don ce-les-te ven a nos;
fi-ja en-tre los hu-mil-des
co-ro-nan-do~a-sí tu don.
E-res tú, Sa-bí-du-ri-a,
to-do~a-mor y com-pa-sión;
ven a to-dos co-ra-zon-es.
trá-e-nos tu ben-di-ción.

2. Con tu~es-pí-ri-tu a-lien-ta
a quien su-fre~en su pe-nar;
que la~he-ren-cia~en ti ten-ga-mos
y po-da-mos des-can-sar.
Tú el Al-fa y O-me-ga
sé de to-do nues-tro ser;
que tu gra-cia nos pro-te-ja
y sos-ten-ga nues-tra fe.

3. Oh, a-mor, no te se-par-es
de tu~i-gle-sia te-rre-nal;
ú-ne-la es-tre-cha-men-te
con el la-zo ma-ter-nal.
Ven, Al-tí-si-ma, a li-brar-nos
dó-ta-nos de tu fa-vor;
nues-tro a-fán tan só-lo se-a
siem-pre pro-cla-mar tu~a-mor. A-mén.

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May 04, 2005

51R O Love Divine, of All That Is

Original Title: "O Love Divine, of All That Is," arranged from John White Chadwick (1865), BANGOR, C.M., William Tans'ur's Compleat Melody (1734); New Title: Same hymn title, no change in lyrics here, same hymn tune. Chadwick was a 19th Century American Unitarian minister, who was graduated from Harvard Divinity in 1864, and ordained at Second Unitarian in Brooklyn; he wrote for both the AUA publication The Christian Register and Harper's. Psalm 139:2, 4, 23, "Thou . . . understandest my thought afar off . . .For there is not a word in my tongue, but, lo . . . thou knowest it altogether . . . Search me, O God, and know my heart: try me, and know my thoughts." Romans 5:8, "But God commendeth [God's] love toward us." "Keep on asking . . . Keep on looking . . . Keep on knocking," Matthew 7:7-8; see also Mark 11:24. The hymn is not included in Singing the Living Tradition, and is not included in The New Century Hymnal.

BANGOR (C.M.)

1. O Love Di-vine, of all that is,
the sweet-ness still and best,
ea-ger I come and rest my heart
up-on thy faith-ful breast.

2. I pray thee turn me not a-way,
for sin-ful though I be,
thou know-est eve-ry-thing I need,
and all my need of thee.


3. I do not pray be-cause I would,
I pray be-cause I must:
There is no mean-ing in my prayer
but thank-ful-ness and trust.


4. And thou wilt hear the thought I mean
and not the words I say;
Wilt hear the thanks a-mong the words
that on-ly seem to pray.

5. Thou dost not wait un-til I urge
my way-ward steps to thee;
But in the dark-ness of my life
art com-ing still to me.


6. And while it hea-vy sighed, my heart
has sung it-self to rest,
O Love Di-vine, for-ev-er near,
up-on thy faith-ful breast. A-men.

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May 05, 2005

51S O Love Divine, of All That Is

Original Title: "O Love Divine, of All That Is," arranged from John White Chadwick (1865), BANGOR, C.M., William Tans'ur's Compleat Melody (1734); New Title: "O Love Divine, of All That Is," rev. REH (2005), ELLACOMBE, C.M.D., Gesangbuch der Herzogl, Wirtermbergischen Katholischen Hofkapelle (1784). Chadwick was a 19th Century American Unitarian minister, who was graduated from Harvard Divinity in 1864, and ordained at Second Unitarian in Brooklyn; he wrote for both the AUA publication The Christian Register and Harper's. Psalm 139:2, 4 (The Message), "God, . . . I'm an open book to you; even from a distance, you know what I'm thinking . . . You know everything I'm going to say before I start the first sentence." Romans 5:8, "God put [God's own] love on the line for us." "Don't bargain with God. Be direct. Ask for what you need," Matthew 7:7; see also Mark 11:24. The hymn is not included in Singing the Living Tradition, and is not included in The New Century Hymnal.

ELLACOMBE (C.M.D.)

1. O Love Di-vine, of all that is,
the sweet-ness still and best,
ea-ger I come and rest my heart
up-on your faith-ful breast.
I pray you turn me not a-way,
what-e'er my va-ni-ty,
you know well eve-ry-thing I need;
My needs to you I plea.

2. I do not pray be-cause I wish,
I pray be-cause I must:
There is no mean-ing in my prayer
but thank-ful-ness and trust.
And you will hear the thought I mean
and not the words I say;
You hear the thanks a-mong the words
that on-ly seem to pray.

3. You do not wait un-til I move
my way-ward steps toward you;
And through the sor-rows of my life
you still my soul pur-sue.
And while it hea-vy sighed, my heart
has sung it-self to rest,
O Love Di-vine, for-ev-er near,
up-on your faith-ful breast.

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May 06, 2005

52R O Thou Whose Spirit Witness Bears

Original Title: "O Thou Whose Spirit Witness Bears," Frederick Lucian Hosmer (1891), STRACATHRO, C.M., alterantive tune, ST. AGNES (not shown), CHARLES HUTCHESON (1832); New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2005), STRACATHRO, C.M. Frederick Lucian Hosmer was a Unitarian minister in the United States and a graduate of Harvard Divinity School. Romans 8:2 (NIV), "the Spirit of life set me free." "The Spirit Itself beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God," Romans 8:16 (KJV). "The written code killeth, but the Spirit giveth life," 2 Corinthians 3:6 (RSV) "We have our hope set on the living God, who is the Savior of all people, especially of those who believe," 1 Timothy 4:10. 1 Corinthians 13:13, "And now there doth remain faith, hope, love -- these three; and the greatest of these is love." Galatians 5:1, 5-6, "For freedom Christ has set us free . . . For through the Spirit, by faith, we eagerly wait for the hope of righteousness . . . the only thing that counts is faith working through love." Ephesians 4:25, 5:2, "Let all of us speak the truth to our neighbors . . . and live in love." The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal (though it should, on both counts).

STRACATHRO (C.M.)

1. O Thou whose Spir-it wit-ness bears
with-in our spir-its free,
that we thy chil-dren are and heirs
of thine e-ter-ni-ty.


2. Here may this sim-ple faith sub-lime,
o’er-arch us like the sky;
Se-cure be-low the drift of time
its firm foun-da-tions lie.


3. Our thought o’er-flows each writ-ten scroll,
our creeds a-rise and fall;
The life of God with-in the soul
lives and out-lasts them all.


4. Here may that wit-ness clear-er grow,
each wait-ing heart with-in
the way of fil-ial du-ty show
and glad o-be-dience win.


5. Here be life’s sor-row sanc-ti-fied,
here truth its ra-diance pour;
While hope and faith and love a-bide
for-ev-er more and more! A-men.

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May 07, 2005

52S O You Whose Spirit Witness Bears

Original Title: "O Thou Whose Spirit Witness Bears," Frederick Lucian Hosmer (1891), STRACATHRO, C.M., alterantive tune, ST. AGNES (not shown), CHARLES HUTCHESON (1832); New Title: "O You Whose Spirit Witness Bears," rev. REH (2005), NORWICH (OLD 137TH), C.M.D., Daye's Psalter (1563). Frederick Lucian Hosmer was a Unitarian minister in the United States and a graduate of Harvard Divinity School. Romans 8:2 (The Message), "The Spirit of life . . . like a strong wind, has magnificently cleared the air, freeing you from . . . brutal tyranny." "God's Spirit touches our spirits and confirms who we really are," Romans 8:16. "The plan wasn't written out with ink on paper, with pages and pages of legal footnotes, killing your spirit," 2 Corinthians 3:6. "We're banking on the living God, Savior of all men and women, especially believers," 1 Timothy 4:10. 1 Corinthians 13:13, "Trust steadily in God, hope unswervingly, love extravagantly. And the best of the three is love." Galatians 5:1, 5-6, "Christ has set us free to live a free life . . . We expectantly wait for a satisfying relationship with the Spirit . . . neither our most conscientious religion nor disregard of religion amounts to anything. What matters is something far more interior: faith expressed in love." Ephesians 4:25, 5:2 (NRSV) "Let all of us speak the truth to our neighbors . . . and live in love." The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal (though it should, on both counts).

NORWICH (OLD 137TH)(C.M.D.)

1. O You whose Spir-it wit-ness bears
with-in our spir-its free,
that we your chil-dren are and heirs
of your e-ter-ni-ty.
Here may this sim-ple faith sub-lime,
shel-ter us like the sky;
Se-cure be-low the drift of time
its firm foun-da-tions lie.

2. Our thoughts flood out each writ-ten scroll,
our creeds a-rise and fall;
The life of God with-in the soul
lives and out-lasts them all.
Here may that wit-ness clear-er grow
each wait-ing heart with-in,
the way of ci-vic du-ty show
and faith-ful liv-ing win.

3. May life’s sor-rows be sanc-ti-fied,
may truth its ra-diance pour,
while hope and faith and love a-bide
for-ev-er more and more.
O You whose Spir-it wit-ness bears
with-in our spir-its free,
that we your chil-dren are and heirs
of your e-ter-ni-ty!

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May 08, 2005

53R Life of All That Lives Below!

Title: "Life of All That Lives Below!," Charles Wesley, Samuel Longfellow, alt. REH (2005); PLEYEL (7.7.7.7.), Ignaz Joseph Pleyel (1791). "For while we life, we are always being given up ... so that the life of Jesus may be made visible in our mortal flesh. So death is at work in us, but life in you," 2 Corinthians 4:11-12. "Be filled with the Spirit," Ephesians 5:18. See also Song of Songs 2:8-13, where the divine is reckoned as "all that lives below," such that the holy is seen as "leaping over mountains, bounding over the hills." Neither Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal includes the hymn.

PLEYEL (7.7.7.7.)

1. Life of all that lives be-low! Let thy spi-rit in us flow;
Let thy life on us out-pour; from thee, in thee, ev-er-more.

2. O for full-er life we pine! Let us more re-ceive of thine;
Still for more on thee we call, thou who fill-est all in all!

3. Live we now in thee; be fed, dai-ly with the liv-ing bread;
in-to thee our spir-its grow, in-to us thy spir-it flow.

4. While we feel the vi-tal blood, while thy full and quicken-ing flood,
through life's eve-ry chan-nel rolls, Soul of all be-liev-ing souls!

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May 09, 2005

54R From Heart to Heart

Original Title: "From Heart to Heart, Creed to Creed," William Channing Gannett (1875), ST. FLAVIAN, C.M., John Day's Psalter (1562), alternative tune, ARLINGTON, C.M., Thomas Augustine Arne (1762); New Title: "From Heart to Heart," rev. REH (2005), ST. FLAVIAN, C.M. Neither Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal includes the hymn. Isaiah 43:19, "A way will I make in the wilderness, and rivers in the desert!" Jeremiah 31:32-33, "But this shall be the covenant . . . I will put my law within them and write it in their hearts." "I will give them a new heart, and I will put a new spirit within them," Ezekiel 11:19. Psalm 1:3, "And he shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of water;" see also Jeremiah 17:8, Psalm 46:4. Pray for one another, so that you may be healed," James 5:16. The hymn does not appear either in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

ST. FLAVIAN (C.M.)

1. From heart to heart, from faith to faith,
the hid-den riv-ers run,
and quick-en all the a-ges down,
which binds us, eve-ry-one.

2. The streams of faith, whose source is God,
whose source, the sound of prayer,
whose mead-ows are the ho-ly lives
up-spring-ing eve-ry-where.

3. And still they move, a broad-ening flood,
and fresh-er, full-er grow.
A sense as if the sea were near,
towards which the ri-vers flow.

4. O you who are the se-cret Source
that ris-es in each soul,
who are the O-cean, too, and yours,
that ev-er deep-ening roll! A-men.

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May 10, 2005

55R Spirit of Life, Attend Our Prayer

Original Title: "Spirit Divine, Attend Our Prayer," Andrew Reed (1829), adapted by Samuel Longfellow, first tune, PRESERVATION, C.M., Johann Georg Christian Stoerl, second tune, ARLINGTON, C.M., Thomas Augustine Arne (1762); New Title: "Spirit of Life, Attend Our Prayer," rev. REH (2006), WINDSOR, C.M., Damon's Psalmes (1591). "Prophesy unto the Spirit, prophesy, son of man, and thou hast said unto the Spirit: Thus said the Lord Jehovah: From the four winds come in, O Spirit, and breathe on these slain, and they do live," Ezekiel 37:9 (YLT); see also Isaiah 34:16. Psalm 143:10, "Thy Spirit [is] good, Lead me into a land of uprightness," see also Psalm 51:11, Psalm 139:7, John 16:13. Acts 2:3 (KJV), "And there appeared unto them cloven tongues like as of fire, and it sat upon each of them," see also Isaiah 6:6-7, Hebrews 1:7, I Chronicles 21:26, Psalm 39:3. Romans 8:2 (KJV), "For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death." Proverbs 1:20-23 (NRSV), "Wisdom cries out in the street; in the squares she raises her voice . . .'I will pour out my thoughts to you,'" see also Proverbs 8:1, Proverbs 9:1,6, Proverbs 22:11-12. Ephesians 6:18 (KJV), "Praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit." Neither Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal includes the hymn.

WINDSOR (C.M.)

1. Spir-it of Life, at-tend our prayer,
and make our hearts your home;
de-scend with all your gra-cious power;
O come, great Spir-it, come!


2. Come as the light! to us re-veal
The truth we long to know;
And lead us in the path of life
Where all the vir-tuous go.

3. Come as the fire! and cleanse our hearts,
with sanc-ti-fy-ing flame,
till our whole souls de-vo-tion make
in love's re-deem-ing name.

4. Come as the dew, and sweet-ly bless
this con-sec-rat-ed hour;
till eve-ry bar-ren place shall own
with joy your quicken-ing power.


5. Come as the wind, O breath of God!
O Wis-dom-bear-ing grace!
Come, make your great sal-va-tion known,
wide as the hu-man race.

6. Spir-it Di-vine, at-tend our prayer;
Make a lost world thy home;
Des-cend with all thy gra-cious powers,
O come, great Spir-it, come.

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May 12, 2005

56R O Love Divine

Original Title: "O Love Divine, Whose Constant Beam," adapted from John Greenleaf Whittier, first tune, PUER NOBIS NASCITUR, L.M., Michael Praetorius (1609), alternative tune, ROCKINGHAM, L.M., second tune, RIVAULX, John Bacchus Dykes (1866); New Title: "O Love Divine," rev. REH (2006), MONTE CASSINO, L.M., Italian Hymn Melody. " I the Lord will make myself known unto him in a vision, and will speak unto him in a dream," Numbers 12:6, see also Job 33:15, Genesis 20:3-7. Genesis 28:12, "And [Jacob] dreamed, and behold a ladder set up on the earth, and the top of it reached to heaven: and behold the angels of God ascending and descending on it." Jeremiah 23:25, "I have heard what the prophets said, that prophesy lies in my name, saying, I have dreamed, I have dreamed." "And there appeared unto them cloven tongues like as of fire, and it sat upon each of them," Acts 2:3, see also Acts 2:7-11, Acts 10:44-46, 1 Corinthians 12:10, Mark 16:17. John 1:32, " I saw the Spirit descending from heaven like a dove," see also Matthew 3:16, Song of Solomon 2:14, 5:2, 12. "God planted a garden eastward in Eden," Genesis 2:8 see also Genesis 2:15. Psalm 46:10, "Be still, and know that I am God." "Do good to them that hate you . . . for [God] maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust," Matthew 5:44-45. Neither Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal includes the hymn.

MONTE CASSINO (L.M.)

1. O Love Di-vine, whose con-stant stream
yet flows when we can-not per-ceive,
and waits to bless all, while we dream;
O stay though we may turn from thee!

2. All souls oft strug-gle and as-pire,
all hearts through thee rest still and deep;
And, dim or clear, thy tongues of fire,
on dusty lands and cen-tu-ries sleep.

3. And eve-ry-where the Spir-it moves
with all, as un-der Ed-en's trees,
in gard-ens of the heart, faith proves,
speak-ing in ma-ny, var-ied tongues.

4. Nor bounds, nor clime, nor creed thou know'st,
wide as our need thy fa-vors fall;
The white wings of the Ho-ly One
stoop, un-seen, o'er the heads of all.

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May 14, 2005

57R Spirit of Truth, You Who Make Bright

Original Title: "Spirit of Truth, Who Makest Bright," Thomas Hornblower Gil (1819-1906), WARRINGTON, L.M., Ralph Harrison (1784); New Title: "Spirit of Truth, You Who Make Bright," Thomas Hornblower Gill, rev. REH (2005), VON HIMMEL HOCH, L.M., Geistliche Lieder, Leipzig (1539). For biographical information about Gil, see no. 9R. "When the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all truth," John 16:13 (New Living Translation), see also John 15:26, 1 John 4:6. " For the power of the life-giving Spirit has freed you," Romans 8:2, see also Romans 8:13, 15:13, 15:19, 1 Samuel 10:16, 1 Corinthians 14:2, 2 Corinthians 6:6, Ephesians 6:18; 1 Peter 1:12. "The spirit of life from God entered them, and they stood up," Revelation 11:11, see also Revelation 22:17. "God is a Spirit: and they that worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth," John 4:24. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

VON HIMMEL HOCH (L.M.)

1. Spir-it of Truth, you who make bright
all souls that long for heaven-ly light,
ap-pear, and on our sad days shine;
Des-cend, and be our Guide Di-vine.

2. Spir-it of Power, whose strength does dwell
full in the souls that love you well,
un-to these beat-ing hearts draw near,
and be our dai-ly Quick-en-er

3. Spir-it of Life, who makes all glad
each brok-en heart by sin made sad,
pour on these mourn-ing souls your cheer;
Grant your bless-ings, O Com-for-ter!


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May 15, 2005

58R O Not In Far-Off Realms of Space

Original Title: "Go Not, My Soul, In Search of Him," Frederick Lucian Hosmer (1879), first tune, OLD 137TH, C.M.D., One and fiftie Psalms of David (1556), second tune, STRACATHRO, C.M, Charles Hutcheson (1832); New Title: "O Not In Far-Off Realms of Space," Frederick Lucian Hosmer (1879), alt. REH (2006), OLD 137TH, C.M.D. Hosmer, born 1840, was an American Unitarian minister, and graduate of Harvard Divinity School. Hosmer's "Go Not My Soul in Search of Him," as it is called in Hymns of the Spirit Two, does not seem to be casually matched with OLD 137TH, but instead seems to take Psalm 137 as a point of radical departure. While the psalm asks how the songs of Zion might be sung in the land of Babylon, in the land of the tormentors, Hosmer to the contrary responds "Soul with soul hath kin." While the original psalm speaks of the throne of Jerusalem as the only throne, Hosmer in dialogue seems again to suggest the contrary, instructing us that the throne of God is not anywhere else but in each soul. When the psalmist tell us that if Zion fades, the psalmist's own strength will fade, Hosmer teaches that the "inward sign" will herald the entire earth shining with "Deity." Rather than looking to Jerusalem, he would have us "repair" to the Jerusalem of the soul. See also Psalm 42:2 (NRSV) "My soul thirsts for God, for the living God. When shall I come and behold the face of God?" and ""Be still, and know that I am God!," Psalm 46:10. 'Thou hast visited the earth, thou hast watered it; thou greatly enrichest it," Psalm 65:9 (Darby). "All the earth is full of his glory," Isaiah 6:3 (KJV). "But whenever you pray, go into your room and shut the door and pray to your Father who is in secret," Matthew 6:6 (NRSV). Isaiah 40:22 (KJV), "It is he that sitteth upon the circle of the earth, and the inhabitants thereof are as grasshoppers; that stretcheth out the heavens as a curtain, and spreadeth them out as a tent to dwell in." Isaiah 54:2, "Enlarge the place of thy tent, and let them stretch forth the curtains of thine habitations: spare not, lengthen thy cords, and strengthen thy stakes." The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition or in The New Century Hymnal.

OLD 137TH (C.M.D.)

1. O not in far-off realms of space
the Spir-it has a throne;
But in each heart finds a true place,
yet wait-ing to be known.
Search not, my soul, a-far in vain:
you will not find God there;
Nor in the depths of sha-dows wane,
nor in the heights of air.

2. Thought ans-wer-ing a-lone to thought,
as Soul with soul has kin;
The out-ward God one rec-kons not
who finds not God with-in.
And if the vi-sion comes rich-ly
re-vealed by in-ward sign,
Earth will be full of De-i-ty
and with full glo-ry shine!

3. You shall not want for com-pa-ny,
nor pitch a tent a-lone;
Th'in-dwell-ing God will go free-ly,
and show you of Life's own.
Search not for God a-far in space,
but to your-self re-pair;
Wait then with-in that si-lent grace,
and you shall find Love there!

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May 18, 2005

59R Breathe on Me, Breath of God

Original Title: "Breathe on Me, Breath of God," Edwin Hatch (1886), ST. BRIDE (S.M.), Samuel Howard (1762); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), WIRKSWORTH (S.M.), John Chetham (1718). Hatch (1853-1899) was English and an Anglican, who taught in British North America. "He breathed on them, and said to them, Receive the Holy Spirit." John 20:22 (NKJV); Psalm 150:6 (NRSV), "Let everything that breathes praise the Lord." "Thus says the Lord God to these bones: I will cause breath to enter you, and you shall live," Ezekiel 37:5 (NRSV). The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition. It does, however, appear in modified form as no. 292 to TRENTHAM (S.M.) in The New Century Hymnal.

WIRKSWORTH (S.M.)

1. Breathe on me, breath of God,
fill me with life a-new,
that I may e'er love what thou dost love,
do what thou wouldst do.

2. Breathe on me, breath of God,
un-til my heart is pure,
un-til with thee I will but one will,
and in faith se-cure.


3. Breathe on me, breath of God,
blend all my soul with thine,
un-til this pass-ing por-tion of me
glows with fire di-vine.

4. Breathe on me, breath of God,
so when I am with thee,
I shall live in thine arms the life
of thine e-ter-ni-ty.

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May 19, 2005

60R O You Whose Presence Glows In All

Original Title: "O God, Whose Presence Glows in All," Nathaniel Langdon Frothingham (1828), O SALUTARIS HOSTIA, L.M., Abbè Duguet (1767), alternative tune, WAREHAM, L.M., William Knapp (1738); New Title: "O You Whose Presence Glows in All," rev. REH (2005), O SALUTARIS HOSTIA, L.M. Forthingham (1793-1870), was an American Unitarian and minister at First Church in Boston. The hymn appears in neither The New Century Hymnal nor in Singing the Living Tradition. "May your love and your truth always protect me," Psalm 40:10-11 (NIV), see also Psalm 26:3, 52:3. "Speaking the truth in love," Ephesians 4:15 (Webster's Bible), see also Colossians 1:5. 1 Corinthians 13:6 (NRSV), "[Love] does not rejoice in wrongdoing, but rejoices in the truth," see also 1 Peter 1:22, 1 John 3:18, 2 John 1:3. "In all their distress he too was distressed, and the angel of his presence saved them. In his love and mercy he redeemed them," Isaiah 63:9.

O SALUTARIS HOSTIA (L.M.)

1. O You whose pre-sence glows in all,
with-in, a-round us, and a-bove,
your words we bless; your names we call,
your words are Truth; your names spell Love.

2. The truth be with the heart be-lieved,
of all who seek this sa-cred place,
with power pro-claimed, in peace re-ceived,
our spir-its light, your spir-it's grace.

3. May Love its ho-ly in-fluence pour
to keep us hum-ble; make us true;
and free us with its bless-ings more
round each with all, and all with You.

4. Send down Love's an-gel to our side,
send in Love's calm up-on the breast;
For we would know no oth-er guide;
We have no need of oth-er rest.

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May 20, 2005

61R Creator Spirit, By Whose Aid

Original Title: "Creator Spirit, By Whose Aid," attributed to Rabanus Maurus (776-856), translated by John Dryden (1693), LUCIS CREATOR, L.M., Angers Church Melody (circa 16th Century); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Original Latin lyrics have been added. "If anyone says to this mountain, 'Go, throw yourself into the sea,' and does not doubt in his heart but believes that what he says will happen, it will be done for him," Mark 11:23. Job 42:1-2, 8 (NRSV), "Then Job answered the Lord: 'I know that you can do all things, and that no purpose of yours can be thwarted' . . . now therefore take seven bulls and seven rams . . . and my servant Job shall pray for you." The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but it does appear in a new translated version entitled "Creator Spirit, Come, We Pray," as no. 268 in The New Century Hymnal.

LUCIS CREATOR (L.M.)

1. Cre-a-tor Spir-it, by whose aid
the world's foun-da-tions first were laid,
come vi-sit eve-ry prayer-ful mind;
come, pour your joys on hu-man-kind.

2. O Source of un-cre-a-ted light,
the hea-ven's high-est help-er bright,
your ho-ly fount, your ho-ly fire,
our hearts with heaven-ly love in-spire.

3. Come, and your sa-cred unc-tion bring,
to sanc-ti-fy us while we sing;
from sin and sor-row set us free,
and may we tem-ples wor-thy be.

4. Plen-teous of grace, come from on high,
rich in your seven-fold en-er-gy;
may we e-ter-nal truths re-ceive,
and prac-tice all that we be-lieve.

a. Ve-ni, Cre-a-tor Spi-ri-tus,
men-tes tu-o-rum vi-si-ta,
im-ple su-per-na gra-ti-a,
quae tu cre-as-ti pec-to-ra.


b. Qui di-ce-ris pa-ra-cli-tus,
al-tis-si-mi do-num De-i,
fons vi-vus, i-gnis, ca-ri-tas,
et spi-ri-ta-lis unc-ti-o.

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May 21, 2005

62R Rise, My Soul, and Stretch Your Wings

Words: Robert Seagrave (1742), alt. REH (2005); Music: AMSTERDAM, 7.6.7.6.7.7.7.6., James Nares, Foundery Collection (1742). Seagrave was English and Anglican. "In My Father’s house there are many rooms . . . I am going there to prepare a place for you," John 14:2. This 18th century hymn is by no means the oldest in Hymns of the Spirit Two, but its lyrics do seem decidedly "unmodern" for the collection. Despite their relatively late composition, they might best be viewed through both pre- and post-modern sensibilities. We are counseled to rise above "transitory things" toward a life of our final destination, toward a life of our ultimate meaning-- toward "heaven." Rather than speaking of "the eternal life," which conjures up images of eternal activity, Seagrave speaks instead of "rest," what the heart and mind and soul seek from time to time in this life too. The sun's daily return does indeed promise the possibility of that elusive paradise, particularly in these days when our "modern," overscheduled lives would seem to leave so little room for rest, or play, or relaxation of any unscripted sort. Rise, and stretch! The hymn does not appear in either Singing the Living Tradition or The New Century Hymnal.

AMSTERDAM (7.6.7.6.7.7.7.6.)

1. Rise, my soul, and stretch your wings, your bet-ter por-tion trace.
Rise from tran-si-to-ry things towards heaven, your des-tined place!
Sun and moons and stars de-cay; time might soon this earth re-move:
Rise, my soul, and haste a-way to seats pre-pared a-bove.

2. Riv-ers to the o-cean run, nor stay in all their course;
Fire as-cend-ing seeks the sun; both speed them to their source:
So my soul, de-rived from God, longs to view God's glo-rious face,
For-ward tends to that a-bode, to rest in that em-brace.

3. Cease, O pil-grims, cease to mourn, press on-ward to the prize;
The Dawn's dai-ly sure re-turn pro-mis-es par-a-dise:
There is ev-er-last-ing peace; rest, may this day's rest, be heaven;
There too ev-en sor-rows cease, and crowns of joy be given.

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May 23, 2005

63R Mysterious Presence, Source of All

Original Title: "Mysterious Presence, Source of All," Seth Curtis Brooks (1866), WAREHAM, L.M., William Knapp (1736); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), LUCIS CREATOR, L.M., Angers Church Melody. Seth Curtis Beach was an American Unitarian. "Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above." James 1:17 (KJV). Psalm 36:6, "Thy judgments are a great deep." Psalm 73:16, "When I thought to know this, it was too painful for me." Psalm 77:19, "Thy way is in the sea, and thy path in the great waters, and thy footsteps are not known." Romans 11:33, "O the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and the knowledge of God! how unserachable are his judgments, and his ways past finding out!" "God formed man from the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life," Genesis 2:7 (NRSV); see also Genesis 1:30, 6:17, 7:15. "For with you is the fountain of life," Psalm 36:9, see also Psalm 68:26, Proverbs 5:18, 13:14, 14:17, 16:22, 18:4. "They have forsaken the fountain of the living water, the Lord," Jeremiah 17:13. Ezekiel 37:9, "Prophesy unto the wind, prophesy . . . and breathe upon these slain, that they may live." John 3:8 (KJV), "The wind bloweth where it listeth . . . so is everyone that is born of the spirit." Acts 2:2, "And suddenly there came a sound from heaven of a rushing mighty wind." The hymn appears in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 92, to WAREHAM, using thee/thou. It does not appear in The New Century Hymnal.

LUCIS CREATOR (L.M.)

1. Mys-ter-ious Pre-sence, Source of all;
The world with-out, the soul with-in,
Foun-tain of life, O hear our call,
and pour your liv-ing wat-ers in!

2. You breathe with-in the rush-ing wind;
Your Spir-it stirs in leaf and flower;
Nor will you from the will-ing mind
with-hold your light and love and power.


3. Your hand un-seen to ac-cents clear
a-woke the psal-mist’s tremb-ling lyre,
and touch-ed the lips of holy seer
with flame from your own al-tar fire.

4. That touch di-vine, ev-er im-part;
Still give the pro-phets' burn-ing word;
And, vo-cal in each wait-ing heart,
let liv-ing psalms of praise be heard.

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64R Thou One in All, Thou All in One

Original Title: "Thou One in All, Thou All in One," Seth Curtis Beach (1884), GRACE CHURCH, L.M., Ignaz Joseph Pleyel (1791); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), LUCIS CREATOR, L.M., Angers Church Melody (c. 16th Century). Seth Curtis Beach was an American Unitarian. The hymn does not appear does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. "A God of truth and without iniquity, just and right is he," Deuteronomy 32:4 (KJV); see also Isaiah 65:16, Psalm 89:14, 146:6, 57:10, 86:15.

LUCIS CREATOR (L.M.)

1. Thou One in all, thou All in One,
Source of the grace that crowns our days,
for all thy gifts 'neath cloud or sun,
we lift to thee our grate-ful praise.

2. We bless thee for the life that flows,
a pulse in ev-ery grain of sand,
a beau-ty in the blush-ing rose,
a thought and deed in brain and hand.

3. For life that thou hast made a joy,
for strength to make our lives like thine,
for du-ties that our hands em-ploy,
we bring our of-ferings to thy shrine.

4. Be thine to give and ours to own
the truth that sets thy chil-dren free,
the law that points us to thy throne,
the love that makes us one with thee.

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May 24, 2005

65R You Whose Spirit Dwells In All

Original Title: "Thou Whose Spirit Dwells In All," John White Chadwick (1890), UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, 7.7.7.7., Henry John Gauntlett (1852); New Title: "You Whose Spirit Dwells In All," alt. REH (2006), same hymn tune. "For the fate of humans and the fate of animals is the same . . . They all have the same breath, and humans have no advantage over the animals," Ecclesiastes 3:19 (NRSV). Genesis 2:7, "And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life," Genesis 7:15, "And [the animals] went in unto Noah into the ark, two and two of all flesh, wherein is the breath of life." "You own the cosmos-you made everything in it, everything from atom to archangel," Psalm 89:11 (The Message); "The heavens are thine, the earth also is thine: The world and the fulness thereof, thou hast founded them," Psalm 89:11 (ASV). "Behold, the nations are esteemed as a drop of the bucket, and as the fine dust on the scales; behold, he taketh up the isles as an atom," Isaiah 40:15 (The Darby Translation); Behold, the nations are like a drop from a bucket, and are accounted as the dust on the scales; behold, he takes up the coastlands like fine dust," Isaiah 40:15 (ESV). "Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit of God dwelleth in you?," 1 Corinthians 3:16 (KJV). "[Christ] has made known to us the mystery of his will, according to his good pleasure that he set forth in Christ, as a plan for the fullness of time, to gather up all things in him, things in heaven and things on earth," Ephesians 1:9-10. "God [is] All in All," 1 Corinthians 15:28. Love is as strong as death," Song of Solomon 8:6. "Would that all the Lord’s people were prophets, that the Lord would put his spirit upon them!," Numbers 11:29 (RSV). For an alternate tune for this hymn, see no. 35 herein, VIENNA, 7.7.7.7. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE (7.7.7.7.)

1. You whose spir-it dwells in all,
pri-mal source of life and mind,
through-out earth and in each soul,
ev-er full and un-con-fined!

2. What shall sep-a-rate from you?
None of earth's cre-a-ted things!
Joy and sor-row, good and ill,
each from you its es-sence brings.

3. Yours, the at-om's faint-est thrill;
Yours, the humb-lest crea-ture's breath;
Pro-phet soul in eve-ry kind,
yearn-ing still through life and death.

4. Yearn-ing for the crown-ing race:
We, in whom at last un-fold
all your se-crets strange and sweet
from the farth-est days of old.

5. Se-crets too of things to be,
in the cy-cles on be-fore:
Love that strong-er is than death,
Life with you for-ev-er-more.


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Continue reading "65R You Whose Spirit Dwells In All"

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66R Day By Day the Manna Fell

Original Title: "Day By Day the Manna Fell," Josiah Conder (1836), rev. REH (2005), NUN KOMM, DER HEIDEN HEILAND, 7.7.7.7., Enchiridion Oder Handbuchlein (1524), Bach. Mark 6:41, 50, "Taking the five loaves and the two fish, he looked up to heaven, and blessed and broke the loaves, and gave them to his disciples to set before the people . . . Immediately he spoke to them and said, 'Take heart, it is I; do not be afraid;'" compare lyrics "cast foreboding fears away." See also John 6:11; John 6:48, 51 "I am the bread of life." Numbers 11:5-6, "We remember the fish we used to eat in Egypt for nothing, the cucumbers, the melons, the leeks, the onions, and the garlic; but now our strength is dried up, and there is nothing at all but this manna to look at;" compare Joshua 5:12. The New Century Hymnal and Singing the Living Tradition do not include the hymn.

NUN KOMM, DER HEIDEN HEILAND (7.7.7.7.)

1. Day by day the man-na fell;
O to learn this les-son well!
Still by cons-tant mer-cy fed,
Give me, God, my dai-ly bread.

2. "Day by day," the pro-mise reads,
dai-ly strength for dai-ly needs;
Cast fore-bod-ing fears a-way;
Take the man-na of to-day.

3. O my times are in thy hand;
All my san-guine hopes ex-pand.
On thy Wis-dom I re-cline,
and would make my pur-pose thine.

4. Thou my dai-ly task shalt give;
Day by day with thee I live;
So shall ad-ded years ful-fill,
still my own, and hea-ven’s will.

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67R O Thou Whose Power Over Moving Worlds Presides

Original Title: "O Thou Whose Power Over Moving World Presides," Boethius (480-525), trans. Samuel Johnson (1750), OLD 124TH (10.10.10.10), Genevan Psalter (1551); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Boethius was a Roman statesman; his most famous work was The Consolations of Philosophy. He has been thought both a Christian and indeed a Christian martyr, yet his most famous work does not mention Christ or the Christian religion, and seems in the eyes of some to speak only the language of neo-Platonism (in a narrow sense, "a philosophical dialogue modelled on strictly pagan productions"). Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), also the name of the Unitarian hymnwriter from the 19th century (see no. 219R), here refers instead to the Englishman from a century before. Johnson was the subject of perhaps the earliest and best-known biography in English, written by John Boswell. A stanza of Boethius' original Latin has been added. "legem pone mihi Domine in via tua et dirige me in semita recta propter inimicos meos," Pslam 26:11 (Vulgate); "But as for me, I will go on in my upright ways: be my saviour, and have mercy on me," Psalm 26:11 (BBE); see also Proverbs 15:24, 12:28. "Dominus solus dux eius fuit et non erat cum eo deus alienus," Deuteronomy 32:12 (Vulgate); "So the Lord only was his guide, no other god was with him," Deuteronomy 32:12 (BBE); Exodus 13:21, 15:13, Acts 1:16. "[T]imor Domini principium," Proverbs 1:7a (Vulgate); "Start with God- the first step in learning is bowing down to God," Proverbs 1:7a (The Message); see also Proverbs 4:7, Proverbs 9:10. "[Christ] is a beginning, a first-born out of the dead," Colossians 1:18a (YLT); "[] qui est principium primogenitus ex mortuis," Colossians 1:18a (Vulgate). Romans 11:33 (KJV), "O the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! how unsearchable are his judgments, and his ways past finding out!" 1 Corinthians 2:7 (KJV), "But we speak the wisdom of God in a mystery, even the hidden wisdom, which God ordained before the world unto our glory," see also 1 Corinthians 1:24. Psalms 104:24 (KVJ), "O Lord, how manifold are thy works! in wisdom, hast thou made them all," see also Psalm 136:5, Proverbs 3:19. Jeremiah 10:12 (KJV), "He hath made the earth by his power, he hath established the world by his wisdom, and hath stretched out the heavens by his discretion." Genesis 1:14, "And God said, let there be lights," see also Genesis 7:24. The hymn is not included in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

OLD 124TH (10.10.10.10)

1. O Thou whose power o'er mov-ing worlds pre-sides,
whose voice cre-a-ted, and whose wis-dom guides,
On the dim earth in pure ef-ful-gence shine,
and cheer the cloud-ed mind with light di-vine,
and cheer the cloud-ed mind with light di-vine.

2. 'Tis thine a-lone to calm the re-verent breast,
with si-lent con-fi-dence and ho-ly rest;
from thee, great God! we spring, to thee we tend,
Path, Mo-tive, Guide, O-rig-i-nal, and End!
Path, Mo-tive, Guide, O-rig-i-nal, and End!

a. Tu nam-que se-re-num,
Tu re-qui-es tran-quil-la pi-is.
Te cer-ne-re fi-nis,
Prin-ci-pi-um, Vec-tor, Dux,
Se-mi-ta, Ter-mi-nus, I-dem.

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May 27, 2005

68R Holy Spirit, Love Divine

Original Title: "Holy Spirit, Light Divine," Andrew Reed (1788-1862) & Samuel Longfellow (1819-1892), LYNE, 7.7.7.7., Magadalen Chapel Hymns (c. 1760); New Title: "Holy Spirit, Love Divine," rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Samuel Longfellow was a Unitarian poet, and editor of Hymns of the Spirit One; Andrew Reed was an English Congregationalist. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but in another form it does appear in The New Century Hymnal under the name "Holy Spirit, Truth Divine," to the tune MERCY, without the revisions by Reed. John 4:24, "God is spirit, and those who worship God must worship in spirit and truth." Psalm 51:2, "Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity, and cleanse me from my sin"

LYNE (7.7.7.7.)

1. Ho-ly Spir-it, Love Di-vine,
glow with-in this heart of mine;
Kind-le eve-ry high de-sire;
cleanse my soul in your pure fire.

2. Ho-ly Spir-it, Light Di-vine,
shine up-on this heart of mine;
As the night soon fades a-way,
turn my thoughts toward your new day.


3. Ho-ly Spir-it, Peace Di-vine,
still this rest-less heart of mine;
Speak to calm the toss-ing sea,
stayed in your tran-quil-i-ty.


4. Ho-ly Spir-it, Power Di-vine,
lift this guil-ty heart of mine;
May the mark be missed no more,
though each soul has failed be-fore.

5. Ho-ly Spir-it, Joy Di-vine,
cheer this sad-dened heart of mine;
Bid my troub-led thoughts be still,
with your peace my spir-it fill.

6. Ho-ly Spir-it, All Di-vine,
dwell with-in this heart of mine;
Cast down eve-ry i-dol high,
reign su-preme, a-bide e'er nigh. A-men


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May 29, 2005

69R O God, O Spirit, Light of All That Live

Original Title: "O God, O Spirit, Light of All That Live," Gerhard Tersteegen (1745), trans. Catherine Winkworth (1855), adapted for Hymns of the Spirit One (1864), BETHSAIDA (LONGWOOD), 10.10.10.10., Joseph Barnby (1872); New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Winkworth was a 19th century English Anglican, and a prolific translator of German-language hymns to English. The hymn appears in neither Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal. "If ye [live] through the Spirit ... ye shall live," Romans 8:13 (KJV); "[A]ccording to my gospel and the preaching of Jesus Christ, according to the revelation of the mystery which hath been kept in silence through times eternal, but now is manifested," Romans 16:25-26 (ASV); "I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely," Revelation 21:6 (ASV); Pslam 114:8; "the Lord will be to you an everlasting light," Isaiah 60:19 (NKJV), 50:10, Psalm 18:28, 56:13, 118:27.

BETHSAIDA (LONGWOOD)(10.10.10.10.)

1. O God, O Spir-it, Light of all that live,
who does on them that sit in sad-ness shine!
The sha-dows ev-er with your power do strive,
yet pour on us a-gain thy rays di-vine.

2. O Breath from out th'e-ter-nal si-lence! Blow
soft-ly up-on our spir-its' wait-ing ground;
The pre-cious full-ness of our God bes-tow,
that fruits of faith, love, rev-erence may a-bound.

3. O Foun-tain, that does un-ex-haust-ed flow,
to quench the thirst that seeks the wa-ters clear!
O God, O Spir-it, Life of lives! Flow now
in-to all hearts which seek com-fort-ing here.

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May 30, 2005

70R Lead Us, O Lead Us (In Paths of Peace)

Words: William Henry Burleigh (1868); rev. REH (2005); Music: SONG 24 (10.10.10. D), Orlando Gibbons (1623). Psalm 5:8 (NIV),"Lead me, O Lord." Psalm 23:2-3 (NRSV), "[The Lord] leads me beside still waters; he restores my soul. He leads me in right paths for his name’s sake." Luke 1:79, "To guide our feet into the way of peace," see also Isaiah 59:8, Romans 3:27. "Her ways are ways of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace," Proverbs 3:17. The hymn appears in neither Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

SONG 10 (10.10.10. D)

1. Lead us, O lead us, in the paths of peace;
with-out thy guid-ing hand we go as-tray,
and doubts ap-pall, and sor-rows still in-crease;
lead us through Christ, thy true and li-ving way.
Lead us, mothe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace;
Lead us, fathe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace.


2. Lead us, O lead us, in the paths of truth;
un-helped by thee, in er-ror's maze we grope,
while pas-sion strains, and fol-ly dims our youth,
and age comes on, un-cheered by faith and hope.
Lead us, mothe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace;
Lead us, fathe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace.

3. Lead us, O lead us, in the paths of right;
dim-ly we stum-ble when we walk a-lone,
hid in the sha-dows of a fear-some night;
on-ly with thee we jour-ney safe-ly on.
Lead us, mothe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace;
Lead us, fathe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace.

4. Lead us, O lead us, to thy heaven-ly rest,
how-ev-er rough and steep the path-way be;
through joy or sor-row, as fate deem-est best,
un-til our lives are per-fect-ed in thee.
Lead us, mothe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace;
Lead us, fathe-ring God, in ho-ly paths of peace.

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June 01, 2005

71R "Where Is Your God?" They Say

Original Title: "'Where Is Your God?' They Say," James Martineau (1873), O GOTT, DU FROMMER GOTT, 6.7.6.7.6.6.6.6., Ahasuerus Fritsch, harm. J. S. Bach; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. James Martineau was an English Unitarian of Huguenot descent, too often underappreciated in North America. Psalm 14:1-2, "Fools say in their hearts, 'There is no God' . . . The Lord looks down from heaven on humankind to see if there are any who are wise, who seek after God." 1 Kings 19:12, "A still, small voice." "If I go forward, he is not there; or backward, I cannot perceive him; on the left he hides, and I cannot behold him; I turn to the right, but I cannot see him," Job 23:8-9. The hymn appears in neither Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal.

O GOTT, DU FROMMER GOTT (6.7.6.7.6.6.6.6.)

1. "Where is your God?" they say:
An-swer them, O Most Ho-ly!
Re-veal your se-cret way
of vi-sit-ing the low-ly:
Not wrapped in mov-ing cloud,
or night-ly rest-ing fire;
But veiled with-in the shroud
of si-lent high de-sire.

2. Come not in flash-ing storm,
or burst-ing frown of thun-der:
Come in the view-less form
of waken-ing love and won-der;
In du-ty grown di-vine
the rest-less spir-it still;
in sor-rows taught to shine
as shad-ows of your will.


3. O God, the pure a-lone,
e'en in their deep con-fess-ing,
can see you as their own
and find a per-fect bless-ing.
Yet to each wait-ing soul
speak in your still small voice,
till brok-en love's made whole,
and sad-dened hearts re-joice.

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June 02, 2005

72R I Cannot Find Thee

Original Title: "I Cannot Find Thee," Eliza Scudder (1864), no changes here, LOMBARD STREET, 11.10.11.10., Frederick George Russell (1929). Scudder (1821-1896) was niece of hymnwriter Edmund Sears. Originally a Unitarian, she subsequently became an Episcopalian. The hymn is (unconscionably) not included in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. Psalm 14:1-2, "Fools say in their hearts, 'There is no God' . . . The Lord looks down from heaven on humankind to see if there are any who . . . seek after God." Mark 9:24, "Lord, I believe; help thou mine unbelief." "If I go forward, he is not there; or backward, I cannot perceive him; on the left he hides, and I cannot behold him; I turn to the right, but I cannot see him," Job 23:8-9 (NRSV). "Return, O my soul, to your rest, for the Lord has dealt bountifully with you," Psalm 116:7.

LOMBARD STREET (11.10.11.10.)

1. I can-not find thee. Still on rest-less pin-ion
my spir-it beats the void where thou dost dwell,
I wan-der lost through all thy vast do-min-ion,
and shrink be-neath thy light in-ef-fa-ble.

2. I can-not find thee. E'en when most a-dor-ing,
be-fore thy throne I bend in low-liest prayer;
Be-yond these bounds of thought my thought up-soar-ing
from far-thest quest comes back: thou art not there.


3. Yet high a-bove the lim-its of my see-ing,
and fold-ed far with-in the in-most heart,
and deep be-low the deeps of con-scious be-ing,
thy splen-dor shin-eth: there, O God, thou art.

4. I can-not lose thee. Still in thee a-bid-ing,
the end is clear, how wide so-e'er I roam;
The hand that holds the worlds my steps is guid-ing,
and I must rest at last in thee, my home.

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June 04, 2005

73R Shekinah In Her Holy Place

Original Title: "The Lord Is In His Holy Place," William Channing Gannett (1873), ST. BERNARD, C.M., Tochter Sion (1741); New Title: "Shekinah In Her Holy Place," rev. REH (2005), RESIGNATION, C.M.D., Traditional American; Southern Harmony (1835). William Channing Gannett (1840-1923) was an American Unitarian minister, particularly active within the Western Unitarian Conference. He was author of a document of great historical importance to the WUC entitled "Things Commonly Believed Among Us". He played a particularly important role in the women's suffrage movement in the United States; Susan B. Anthony was amongst his congregants. Though "Shekinah" does not appear in the original title of the hymn, it does occur as a reference to the glory of God in the lyrics of the first stanza (itself remarkable for a hymn composed in 1873). The reference to Exodus 40:35 is likewise original to Gannett. The word "Shekinah" does not appear as such in the Bible, but it does appear in Talmudic literature; e.g., "Whenever ten are gathered for prayer, there Shekinah rests," Talmud Sanhedrin 39a. A feminine word in Hebrew, many have suggested that the name Shekinah represents the female attributes of the presence or glory of God (though there would seem to be some competition with Wisdom/Sophia and the Spirit/Ruah, also feminine in Hebrew, or perhaps even St. Julian of Norwich's views on the mothering qualities of Christ). "Have you entered the storehouses of the snow, or have you seen the storehouses of the hail," Job 38:22 (NRSV). "If thou know not, O thou fairest among women, go thy way forth by the footsteps of the flock, and feed thy kids beside the shepherds' tents," Song of Songs 1:8 (KJV); see also Jeremiah 6:3. "Gethsemane," Matthew 26:36, Mark 14:32. "Men of Israel, why does this surprise you?," Acts 3:12 (NIV). "Do not I fill heaven and earth?, declares the Lord," Jeremiah 23:24. The hymn does not appear in The New Century Hymn nor in Singing the Living Tradition.

RESIGNATION (C.M.D.)

1. She-ki-nah* in her ho-ly place,
in all things, near and far;
She-ki-nah of the snow-flake, too,
finds glo-ry in the star.
She finds her-self with-in the love
of those whom we love best;
the smiles and tones that make our homes
are shrines by her poss-essed.

2. Our art may build its house of God,
our feet on Si-nai stand,
but ho-li-est of ho-lies knows
no tread, no touch of hand.
She tents with-in the lone-ly heart
and shep-herds eve-ry thought;
We find her not by seek-ing long,
we lose her not, un-sought.

3. The liste-ning soul makes Si-nai still
wher-ev-er we may be,
and in the vow "Thy will be done,"
lies all Geth-se-ma-ne.
O eve-ry-where her ho-ly place,
if love un-seals the eyes,
and eve-ry-where the wait-ing face
to wel-come and sur-prise!

* Shekinah, the visible glory of God; see, e.g., Exodus 40:35

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June 05, 2005

74R Behold a Sower!

Original Title: "Behold a Sower!," Washington Gladden (1897), ELLACOMBE, C.M.D., Gesangbuch der Herzogl. Wirtembergischen Katolischen Hofkapelle (1784); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Gladden was a Congregationalist minister, well known for his writings and lectures on social concerns during the 19th Century. Luke 8:11 (KJV), "Now the parable is this: The seed is the word of God," see also 1 Peter 1:23, 1 John 3:9. Matthew 13:3, "And he spake many things unto them in parables, saying, Behold, a sower went forth to sow," see also Matthew 13:32, 1 Corinthians 9:11. Job 4:8, "Even as I have seen, they that plow iniquity, and sow wickedness, reap the same," see also Hosea 10:12, Galatians 6:7-8. 2 Peter 1:19, "We have also a more sure word of prophecy; whereunto ye do well that ye take heed, as unto a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day star arise in your hearts," see also Daniel 2:22, John 8:12, John 12:46, 1 Peter 2:9, 2 Corinthians 4:4. The hymn does not appear in either Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

ELLACOMBE (C.M.D.)

1. Be-hold a Sow-er! from a-far
who go-eth forth with might,
whose fur-rows are the roll-ing years,
and seeds, the grow-ing light;
For all the just the Word is sown,
it spring-eth up al-ways;
The tend-er blade is Hope's young dawn,
the harv-est, Love's new days.

2. O Life of life, to thee we lift
our hearts in praise for those,
thy pro-phets, who have shown thy gift
of grace that ev-er grows,
of truth that spreads from shore to shore,
of wis-dom's widen-ing ray,
of light that shin-eth more and more
un-to thy per-fect day.

3. Shine forth, O Light, that we may see,
with hearts all un-a-fraid,
the mean-ing and the mys-ter-y
of things that thou hast made;
Shine forth, and let the sha-dowed past
be-neath thy beam grow bright;
Shine forth, and touch the fu-ture vast
with thine un-troubl-ed light.

4. Light up thy word; the fet-tered page
from kill-ing bon-dage free;
Light up our way; lead forth this age
in Love’s large li-ber-ty.
O Light of light! with-in us dwell,
through us thy ra-diance pour,
that word and life thy truths may tell,
and praise thee ev-er-more.

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June 06, 2005

75R Light of Ages and of Nations

Original Title: "Light of Ages and of Nations," Samuel Longfellow, AUSTRIA, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., Franz Joseph Haydn (1797); New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2006), IN BABILONE, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., Traditional Dutch melody (c. 1710). The hymn does not appear in The New Century Hymnal, but does appear in Singing the Living Tradition, to the tune AUSTRIA as no. 190 and IN BABILONE as no. 189. Colossians 3:11 (ESV), "Here there is not Greek and Jew, circumcised and uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave, free; but Christ is all, and in all." Galatians 3:28, "There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus." 1 Corinitians 12:13, "For in one Spirit we were all baptized into one body--Jews or Greeks, slaves or free--and all were made to drink of one Spirit." Roman 10:12, "For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek; the same Lord is Lord of all, bestowing his riches on all who call on him;" see also Romans 3:9, 2:14-15, 1:14-16. Jeremiah 31:33 (NRSV), "But this is the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, says the Lord: I will put my law within them, and I will write it on their hearts." Psalms 27:1 (KJV), "The LORD is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? the LORD is the strength of my life; of whom shall I be afraid?" Psalms 36:9, "For with thee is the fountain of life: in thy light shall we see light." James 5:10, "Take, my brethren, the prophets, who have spoken in the name of the Lord, for an example of suffering affliction, and of patience," see also Luke 1:67, 2 Peter 1:21, 2 Chronicles 33:18, Ezekiel 3:11, Luke 4:17, Acts 13:15.

IN BABILONE (8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7.)

1. Light of a-ges and of na-tions,
eve-ry race and eve-ry time
has re-ceived your in-spi-ra-tions,
glimp-ses of your truth sub-lime.
al-ways spir-its in rapt vi-sion
passed the heaven-ly veil with-in,
al-ways hearts bow-ed in con-tri-tion
found sal-va~tion from their sin.


2. Rea-son's no-ble as-pi-ra-tion
truth in grow-ing clear-ness saw;
Con-science spoke its con-dem-na-tion,
or pro-claimed th'e-ter-nal law.
While your in-ward re-ve-la-tions
told your saints their prayers were heard,
pro-phets to the guil-ty na-tions
spoke your ev-er-las-ting word.

3. Lo, that word a-bi-deth ev-er,
re-ve-la-tion is not sealed.
An-swering now to our en-dea-vor,
truth and right are still re-vealed.
That which came to an-cient sa-ges,
Greek, Bar-bar-ian, Ro-man, Jew,
writ-ten in the soul's deep pa-ges,
shines to-day, for-ev-er new!

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June 07, 2005

76R It Sounds Along the Ages

Original Title: "It Sounds Along the Ages," William Channing Gannet, alt. (1937), CRÜGER, 7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6., arranged by W. H. Monk from J. Crüger's Neues Wolllkömiisches Gesangbuch (1640); New Title: Same hymn title, BRITISH GRENADIERS, 7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6., Traditional English Melody. It would seem that Gannett entitled the piece "The Word of God." William Channing Gannett (1840-1923) was an American Unitarian minister, particularly active within the Western Unitarian Conference. He was author of a document of great historical importance to the WUC entitled "Things Commonly Believed Among Us". He played a particularly important role in the women's suffrage movement in the United States; Susan B. Anthony was amongst his congregants. "Jews or Greeks, slaves or free—and we were all made to drink of one Spirit," 1 Corinthians 12:13 (NIV); see also 1 Corinthians 12:17, Colossians 3:11, Galatians 3:28. "The Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you everything," John 14:26 (NRSV); see also John 16:13. The hymn does not appear in The New Century Hymnal, but does appear in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 187, to the tune FAR OFF LANDS, 7.6.7.6. D, Melody of the Bohemian Brethren, Rock Island, Illinois (1892).

BRITISH GRENADIERS (7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6.)

1. It sounds a-long the a-ges,
soul an-swer-ing to soul;
It kin-dles on the pa-ges
of eve-ry Bi-ble scroll;
The psalm-ist heard and sang it,
from mar-tyr lips it broke,
and pro-phet tongues out-rang it
till sleep-ing na-tions woke.

2. From Si-nai's cliffs in ech-oed,
it breathed from Bud-dha's tree,
it charmed in Ath-en's mar-ket,
it hal-lowed Gal-i-lee;
The ham-mer stroke of Lu-ther,
the Pil-grims' sea-side prayer,
the or-a-cles of Con-cord:
one ho-ly Word de-clare.

3. It calls, and lo, new Jus-tice!
It speaks, and lo, new Truth!
In ev-er no-bler sta-ture
and un-ex-haus-ted youth.
For-ev-er on it sound-eth,
knows naught it-self of time,
our laws but catch the mus-ic
of its e-ter-nal chime.

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June 08, 2005

77R One Thought I Have

"One Thought I Have, My Ample Creed," Frederick L. Hosmer, Chicago Unity Hymns and Carols (1880), ST. BERNARD, C.M. No changes here from the lyrics in Hymns of the Spirit Two. Psalm 94:19 (KJV), “In the multitude of my thoughts within me Thy comforts delight my soul;” Psalm 43:3, "O send out thy light and thy truth: let them lead me;" see also Psalms 63:5-6, 77:2; Jeremiah 20:12. Romans 5:4 (NRSV), "[E]ndurance produces character, and character produces hope;" 1 Peter 1:7, "[T]he genuineness of your faith—being more precious than gold that, though perishable, is tested by fire—may be found to result in praise and glory and honor when Jesus Christ is revealed."

ST. BERNARD (C.M.)

1. One thought I have, my am-ple creed,
so deep it is and broad,
and e-qual to my ev-ery need—
it is the thought of God.

2. Each morn un-folds some fresh sur-prise,
I feast at life’s full board;
and ris-ing in my in-ner skies
shines forth the thought of God.

3. At night my glad-ness is my prayer;
I drop my dai-ly load,
and eve-ry care is pillow-ed there
up-on the thought of God.

4. I ask not far be-fore to see,
but take in trust my road;
Life, death, and im-mort-al-i-ty
are in my thought of God.

5. To this their se-cret strength they owed
the mar-tyr's path who trod;
The foun-tains of their pa-tience flowed
from out their thought of God.

6. Be still the light up-on my way,
my pil-grim staff and rod,
my rest by night, my strength by day
O bless-ed thought of God.

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June 09, 2005

78R Who Fathoms the Eternal Thought

Original Title: "Who Fathoms the Eternal Thought," John Greenleaf Whittier; ST. BERNARD, C.M., Tochter Sion (1741). Psalm 46:10 (KJV), "Be still, and know that I am God;" Psalm 100:3, "Know ye that the Lord he is God;" see also Deuteronomy 4:35, 1 Kings 18:39, Ezekiel 34:30, Exodus 18:11. Isaiah 2:11, [T]he haughtiness of men shall be bowed down, and the Lord alone shall be exalted in that day;" see also 2 Corinthians 10:5. 1 Kings 19:12, "And after the earthquake a fire; but the LORD was not in the fire: and after the fire a still small voice;" 1 John 4:8-16 "God is Love." Psalm 78:41, "And still again they tried God, and set bounds to the Holy One of Israel;" see also Psalms 74:17, 148:6; Job 26:10, 38:10.

ST. BERNARD (C.M)

1. Who fath-oms the E-ter-nal Thought?
Which mor-tal hath all planned?
For God is God, who need-eth not
the schemes of hu-man hand.

2. I walk with bare, hushed feet the ground
ye tread with bold-ness shod;
I dare not fix with mete and bound
the love and power of God.

3. I know not what the fu-ture hath
of mar-vel or sur-prise,
as-sured a-lone that life and death
God's mer-cy un-der-lies.

4. I know not where God's is-lands lift
their frond-ed palms in air;
I on-ly know I can-not drift
be-yond such love and care.

5. And so be-side the si-lent sea
I wait the muf-fled oar;
no harm shall ev-er come to me
on o-cean or on shore.

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June 10, 2005

79R Father and Friend, Thy Light, Thy Love

ROSE HILL (L.M.)

1. Fath-er and Friend, thy light, thy love,
beam-ing through all thy works we see;
Thy glo-ry gilds the heavens a-bove,
and all the earth is full of thee.

2. Thy voice we hear, thy pre-sence feel,
while thou, too pure for mor-tal sight,
reign-est in clouds, in-vi-sib-le,
thou, La-dy of our life and light.

3. We know not in what hal-lowed part
of the wide heavens thy throne may be,
but this we know, that where thou art,
strength, wis-dom, good-ness dwell with thee.

4. Thy chil-dren shall not faint nor fear,
sus-tained by this ex-alt-ed thought;
Since thou, their God, art ev-ery-where,
they can-not be where thou art not!

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June 11, 2005

80R Immortal Love, Forever Full

Lyrics: John Greenleaf Whittier (1866), rev. REH (2005); Music: DUNDEE (C.M.), Scottish Psalter (1615). Psalm 89:1 (NRSV), "I will sing of your steadfast love, O Lord;" see also Psalm 89:28. Genesis 1:2a, "[A] wind from God swept over the face of the waters." Isaiah 35:6, "[W]aters shall break forth in the wilderness, and streams in the desert;" see also Isaiah 41:17-18, Jeremiah 2:13, 17:13, Ezekiel 47:1-12. John 4:14, "The water that I will give will become in them a spring of water gushing up to eternal life;" see also Revelation 21:6. 2 Corinthians 3:6b, "[T]he letter kills, but the Spirit gives life;" John 1:9, "The true light, which enlightens everyone, was coming into the world."

DUNDEE (C.M.)

1. Im-mort-al Love, for-ev-er full,
for-ev-er flow-ing free,
for-ev-er shared, for-ev-er whole,
a nev-er ebb-ing sea!

2. Blow, winds of God, a-wake and blow
the mists of earth a-way:
Shine out, O Light di-vine, and show
thy wide and vast ar-ray.


3. O God and Sove-reign of us all,
what-e'er our name or sign,
we own thy sway, we hear thy call,
we test our lives by thine.

4. The let-ter fails, the sys-tems fall,
and ev-ery sym-bol wanes;
The Spir-it o-ver-brood-ing all,
E-ter-nal Love re-mains.

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June 12, 2005

81R Thou Life Within My Life

Original Title: "Thou Life Within My Life," Eliza Scudder (1871), ELLERS, 10.10.10.10., Edward John Hopkins (1868); New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2005), FARLEY CASTLE, 10.10.10.10., Henry Lawes (c. 1637-38).

FARLEY CASTLE (10.10.10.10)

1. Thou Life with-in my life, than self more near,
Thou veil-ed Pres-ence in-fi-nite-ly clear,
From all il-lu-sive shows of sense I flee,
I find my cen-ter and my rest in thee.


2. Be-low all depths thy sav-ing mer-cy lies,
Through thick-est glooms I see thy light a-rise;
A-bove the high-est heavens thou art not found,
More sure-ly than with-in this earth-ly round.

3. Face earn-est-ly in life the doubts that rise,
And seek to know all e'en in dis-tant skies;
Face earn-est-ly in life the self that dares;
As-sume the bur-den of thy sins and cares.

4. How shall I call thee who art al-ways here?
How shall I praise thee who art still most dear?
What may I give thee save what thou hast given?
And whom but thee have I in earth or heaven?

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"Whom have I in heaven but thee?," Psalm 73:25 (KJV); "No one has ever seen God, not so much as a glimpse. This one-of-a-kind God-Expression, who exists at the very heart of the Father, has made him plain as day," John 1:18 (The Message).

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June 13, 2005

82R Thou Hidden Love of God

Original Title: "Thou Hidden Love of God," Gerhard Tersteegen (1729) trans. John Wesley (1738) GOTTLOB, ES GEHT, 8.8.8.8.8.8., German Chorale, harm. J. S. Bach (1747); New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2008), same hymn tune.

GOTTLOB, ES GEHT (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. Thou hid-den love of God, whose height,
Whose depth un-fath-omed no one knows,
I see from far thy beau-teous light,
In-ly I sigh for thy re-pose;
My heart is pained, nor can it be
At rest, till it finds rest in thee.

2. Thy se-cret voice in-vites me still
The sweet-ness of thy yoke to prove;
And fain I would: but though my will
Seems fixed, yet wide my pas-sions rove;
Yet hind-ranc-es strew all the way;
I aim at thee, yet from thee stray.

3. 'Tis mer-cy all, that thou hast brought
My mind to seek true peace in thee;
Yet, while I seek but find thee not,
No peace my wand-'ring soul shall see.
Oh, when shall all my wand-'rings end,
And all my steps to thee-ward tend?

4. O Love, thy sove-reign aid im-part,
To save me from low-thought-ed care;
Chase this self-will through all my heart,
Through all its la-tent maz-es there;
Make me thy du-teous child, that I
Cease-less may Ab-ba, Ab-ba, cry!

5. Each mo-ment draw from earth a-way
My heart which low-ly waits thy call;
Speak to my in-most soul and say
'I am thy Love, thy God, thy All.'
To feel thy power, to hear thy voice,
To taste thy love, be all my choice.

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Psalm 5:3 (NRSV), "O Lord, in the morning you hear my voice; in the morning I plead my case to you, and watch;" Psalm 46:10, "Be still, and know that I am God!;" Psalm 108:4, "For your steadfast love is higher than the heavens, and your faithfulness reaches to the clouds;" Psalm 131:2, Matthew 5:7, “Blessed are the merciful, for they will receive mercy;" Matthew 14:23, [H]e went up the mountain by himself to pray. When evening came, he was there alone;" Mark 1:35; 1 Corinthians 7:29-31; Ephesians 5:15-20.

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June 14, 2005

83R God Is Love Whose Mercy Brightens

Original Title: "God Is Love, His Mercy Brightens," John Bowring (1825), first tune, MARCHING, 8.7.8.7., Martin Shaw (1915), second tune, STOCKWELL, 8.7.8.7., Darius Eliot Jones; New Title: "God Is Love Whose Mercy Brightens," rev. REH (2008), MARCHING, 8.7.8.7.

MARCHING (8.7.8.7.)

God is love; whose mercy brightens
All the paths in which we rove;
Bliss love wakes, and woe it lightens:
God is wisdom, God is love.

Chance and change are busy ever;
We decay and ages move;
But pure mercy waneth never:
God is wisdom, God is love.

E’en an hour that gloomy seemeth
Will a changeless goodness prove;
From the mist a brightness streameth:
God is wisdom, God is love.

One with earthly cares entwineth
Hope and comfort from above;
Everywhere true glory shineth:
God is wisdom, God is love.

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83S Espíritu de luz y amor

Título: "Espíritu de luz y amor," Anónimo, rev. REH (2006), MARCHING, 8.7.8.7., Martin Fallas Shaw (1915). Aparece como no. 52 en El Himnario (Church Publishing, Inc. 1998), con la tonada DOMINUS REGIT ME, 8.7.8.7., John B. Dykes. "Dios es luz," 1 Juan 1:5 (BLS); "Dios . . . ha llenado de luz nuestro corazón," 2 Corintios 4:6 (Castilian); "Dios, . . . me has librado de la muerte, para que siempre, en tu presencia, camine en la luz de la vida," Salmos 56:13 (NVI). "Sobre Dios extiende su luz y cubre con ella las profundidades del mar," Job 36:30 (RVR 1995). "Dios es amor; y el que vive en amor, vive en Dios, y Dios en él," 1 Juan 4:16 (RVA); veáse también 1 Juan 4:7-8, 12, Efesios 2:4, Romanos 15:30. "Se les aparecieron entonces unas lenguas como de fuego," Hechos 2:3 (NVI); Isaías 30:27.

MARCHING (8.7.8.7.)

1. Es-pí-ri-tu de luz y~a-mor,
es-cu-cha nues-tro rue-go;
in-fla-ma nues-tro co-ra-zón
con tu ce-les-te fue-go.

2. Ven a los que~en do-lor es-tán,
sus al-mas vi-vi-fi-ca;
y~a los que por ti vi-ven
y a-lé-gra-les la vi-da.

3. Pro-me-sa de di-vi-na paz,
y dá-di-va del buen Dios,
con tu po-der, con tu vir-tud,
vi-sí-ta-nos, no tar-des.

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June 15, 2005

84R O Love of God, How Strong and True

HERR JESU CHRIST, WHAR'R MENSCH (L.M.)

1. O Love of God, how strong and true!
E-ter-nal, and yet ev-er new;
Un-com-pre-hen-ded and un-bought,
be-yond all know-ledge and all thought.

2. O heaven-ly Love, how pre-cious still,
in days of wea-ri-ness and ill,
in nights of pain and help-less-ness,
to heal, to com-fort, and to bless!

3. O wide em-bra-cing, won-drous love!
We read you in the sky a-bove,
we read you in the earth be-low,
in seas that swell, and streams that flow.

4. O Love of God, our shield and stay
through all the pe-rils of our way!
E-ter-nal Love, in you we rest
for-ev-er safe, for-ev-er blest.

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June 16, 2005

85R Father, Hear the Prayer We Offer

Words: Love Maria Willis (1859), rev. REH (2006); Music: SUSSEX (8.7.8.7.), English melody, adapt. by Ralph Vaughan Williams. "Hear my prayer, O God," Psalm 54:2

SUSSEX (8.7.8.7.)

1. Fath-er, hear the prayer we of-fer:
Nor for ease that prayer shall be,
but for strength, that we may ev-er
live our lives cour-age-ous-ly.

2. Not for-ev-er in green pas-tures,
Shep-herd-ess, we ask to be,
but the steep and rug-ged path-way
may we tread re-joic-ing-ly.

3. Not for-ev-er by still wa-ters
would we id-ly, qui-et stay;
But would smite the liv-ing foun-tains
from the rocks a-long our way.

4. Be our strength in hours of weak-ness,
in our wan-derings be our guide;
Through en-dea-vor, fail-ure, dan-ger,
Sove-reign, O be at our side.

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June 17, 2005

86R In Thee Are All As In a Mother's Home

"[T]his brother of yours was dead and has come to life; he was lost and has been found," Luke 15:32b (NRSV); see also Luke 15:4.

FARLEY CASTLE (10.10.10.10)

1. In thee, are all as in a moth-er's home,
thou dost sur-round us like the am-bient air;
Or like a bound-less sea, o'er which we roam,
and find thy gra-cious pre-sence al-ways there.

2. Thy love en-folds us, like a fath-er's arms;
Thy hand as-sists us when we go as-tray;
Thy sooth-ing voice sub-dues our vain a-larms,
and calls us back to Wis-dom's bet-ter way.

3. Through all vi-cis-si-tudes of good and ill,
we find in thee a hel-per and a friend;
Ne'er hast thou failed us; We will trust thee still,
and walk with thee un-til our days shall end.

4. End, in the dawn of the Im-mort-al Day,
of which thou art the Sun, O Love Di-vine!
When we, by thee il-lu-mined, find for aye
our con-science, rea-son, will, con-formed to thine.

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June 18, 2005

87R My Shepherd's Holy Reign Is Love

Original Title: "The King of Love My Shepherd Is," Henry Williams Baker, New Title: "My Shepherd's Holy Reign Is Love," rev. REH (2006), ST. COLUMBA, 8.7.8.7., Ancient Irish Melody; Paraphrase of Psalm 23. Though it does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, the hymn appears as no. 248 under the name "Such Perfect Love My Shepherd Shows," to the tune DOMINUS REGIT ME (with ST. COLUMBA suggested as an alternative) in The New Century Hymnal.

ST. COLUMBA (8.7.8.7.)

1. My Shep-herd's ho-ly reign is love,
whose good-ness fail-eth ne-ver;
I noth-ing lack if I have love
and love is mine for-ev-er.

2. Where streams of liv-ing wa-ter flow
my ran-somed soul God lead-eth,
and where the ver-dant pas-tures grow,
with food cel-es-tial feedeth.


3. Care-less and fool-ish oft I strayed,
but yet in love God sought me,
and on the shoul-der gent-ly laid,
and home, re-joic-ing, brought me.


4. In death’s deep vale I fear no ill
with thee, dear God, be-side me;
Thy rod and staff my com-fort still,
thy child be-fore to guide me.

5. Thou spread’st a ta-ble in my sight;
Thy unc-tion grace be-stow-eth;
And O what trans-port of delight
from thy pure cha-lice flow-eth!


6. And so through all the length of days
thy good-ness fail-eth ne-ver;
Good Shep-herd, may I sing thy praise
with-in thy house for-ev-er.

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June 19, 2005

88R Come, My Soul, the Hour Is Waking

HAYDN (LUX PRIMA)(8.4.7.8.4.7.)

1. Come, my soul, the hour is wak-ing;
Now is break-ing o'er the earth a-no-ther day;
Come to One that made this splen-dor;
May I ren-der all my morn-ing strength can pay.

2. I, too, hail the Sun re-turn-ing,
rea-dy burn-ing the in-cense of my soul's powers,
for the night is safe-ly end-ed,
God has tend-ed the soul with care through help~less hours.

3. Pray that Love may pros-per ev-er
each en-dea-vor when our aim is good and true;
And that Wis-dom ev-er thwart us,
and re-store us, when the soul would ev-il~pur-sue.

4. May my soul on life’s last mor-row,
free from sor-row, slip a-way in slum-ber sweet:
And, re-leased from death’s last sad-ness,
rise in glad-ness that far bright-er Sun to greet.

5. On-ly God’s free gifts a-buse not,
light re-fuse not, but the Spir-it’s voice o-bey;
May my soul with Love ere be-hold
and light en-fold all things al-ways in un~cloud~ed day.

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June 20, 2005

89R O God of Morning (and of Night)

Original Title: "Lord God of Morning and of Night," Francis Turner Palgrave (1860), MORNING HYMN, L.M., François Hippolyte Barthélémon (1785); New Title: "O God of Morning (and of Night)," rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Palgrave was an English Anglican. Psalm 130:6, "My soul waits for the Lord more than those who watch for the morning."

MORNING HYMN (L.M.)

1. O God of morn-ing and of night,
we thank thee for thy gifts of light;
as in the dawn the sha-dows fly,
we seem to find thee now more nigh.


2. Fresh hopes have wak-ened in the heart,
fresh force to do our dai-ly part;
thy slum-ber gifts our strength re-store,
through-out the day to serve thee more.

3. Yet while thy will we would pur-sue,
oft what we would we can-not do;
the Sun may stand in ze-nith skies,
but on the soul thick mid-night lies.


4. O Light of lights, 'tis thou a-lone
canst make our sha-dowed hearts thine own;
though this new day with joy we see,
Great Dawn of God, we cry for thee.

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June 21, 2005

90R The Morning Hangs a Signal

Original Title: "The Morning Hangs a Signal," William Channing Gannett, MEIRIONYDD, 7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6., William Lloyd (1840); New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2007), same hymn tune. William Channing Gannett (1840-1923) was an American Unitarian minister, particularly active within the Western Unitarian Conference. He was author of a document of great historical importance to the WUC entitled "Things Commonly Believed Among Us". He played a particularly important role in the women's suffrage movement in the United States; Susan B. Anthony was amongst his congregants while a pastor in Rochester, New York. "I appointed you a prophet to the nations . . . Now I have put my words in your mouth," Jeremiah 1:5, 9 (NRSV). "No prophet is accepted in the prophet’s hometown," Luke 4:24. "The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear?," Psalm 27:1 (KJV). "But for you who revere my name the sun of righteousness shall rise, with healing in its wings," Malachi 4:2 (NRSV); see also Psalm 19:5-6, 84:11, Matthew 13:43, Isaiah 58:8. "I am the root and the offspring of David, and the bright and morning star, Revelation 22:16 (KJV), see also Joel 2:2. "Is not my word like fire," Jeremiah 23:29 (NRSV); see also Jeremiah 5:14. The hymn does not appear in The New Century Hymnal, but it does appear in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 40, slightly modified from how it appears in Hymns of the Spirit Two, and in a form with minor differences from below.

MEIRIONYDD (7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6.)

1. The morn-ing hangs a sig-nal
up-on the moun-tain crest,
while all the sleep-ing val-leys
in sil-ent dark-ness rest;
From peak to peak it flash-es,
it laughs a-long the sky,
til glo-ry of the sun-light
on all the land doth lie.

2. A-bove the gen-er-a-tions,
the lone-ly proph-ets rise,
while truth flings dawn and day-star
with-in their glow-ing eyes;
And oth-er eyes, be-hold-ing,
are kind-led from that flame,
and dawn be-com-eth morn-ing,
as proph-ehts Love pro-claim.

3. The soul hath lift-ed mo-ments,
a-bove the drift of days,
when life's great mean-ing break-eth
in sun-rise on our ways;
Be-hold the ra-diant to-ken
of faith a-bove all fear;
Night soon shall end its splen-dor
that morn-ing shall ap-pear.

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June 22, 2005

91R O God I Thank Thee For Each Sight

O God, I thank thee for each sight
Of beauty that thy hand doth give;
For sunny skies and air and light;
O God, I thank thee that I live.

That life I consecrate to thee,
And ever as the day is born,
On wings of joy my soul would flee,
And thank thee for another morn.

Another day to which to cast
Some silent deed of love abroad,
That, greatening as it journeys past,
May do some earnest work for God.

Another day to do, to dare,
To use anew my growing strength,
To arm my soul with faith and prayer,
And so reach heaven and Thee at last.

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June 23, 2005

92R When Morning Gilds the Skies

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June 24, 2005

93R Awake, My Soul, and with the Sun

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93S Awake, My Soul, and with the Sun

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June 25, 2005

94R True Mirror of the Godhead

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94S True Mirror of the Godhead

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June 26, 2005

95R O God, the Watches of the Night (Are O'er)

Original Title: "Father, the Watches of the Night Are O'er," Words: from the Disciples' Hymn-Book (c. 1855), rev. REH (2005); Music: BATTLE (10.10.10.10.), Henry Lawes (1638); alternate, Music: SKARA (10.10.10.10), Frank Sewall (c. 1910). Psalm 63:6 (NRSV), "I think of you on my bed, and meditate on you in the watches of the night;" see also Psalm 74:16, Psalm 19:2, Psalm 55:17, Psalm 104:23. The hymn does not appear in either Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

BATTLE (10.10.10.10.)

1. O God, the watch-es of the night are o'er;
To light and life the soul has risen once more;
Praised be, So-phi-a, who through help-less hours,
does keep in deep-est peace her slum-bering powers.

2. Fath-er, the watch-es of the day are here;
More than from those of night have we to fear;
By rude cares troub-led, by temp-ta-tions pressed,
through the day watch-es, dear God, give us rest!

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95S O God the Watches of the Night Are O'er

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June 27, 2005

96R High O'er the Lonely Hills

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June 28, 2005

97R Morning Has Broken

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97S O Mother Bear Tracks O'er the Ground Sacred

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June 29, 2005

98R New Every Morning Is the Love

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June 30, 2005

99R Out of Shadows the Circling Sphere

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July 01, 2005

100R God That Made the Earth and Heaven

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101R Now When the Melting Shades of Night Retreating

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July 02, 2005

102R Now With Creation's Morning Song

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July 03, 2005

103R Awake Our Souls! Away Our Fears!

Orginal Title: "Awake Our Souls! Away Our Fears!" Issac Watts (1707), TRURO (L.M.), Psalmodia Evangelica (1789); No changes here. It does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal. 2 Corinthians 5:17b (NRSV), "[E]verything old has passed away; see, everything has become new!"

TRURO (L.M.)

1. A-wake, our souls! a-way, our fears!
Let eve-ry trem-bling thought be gone!
A-wake, and run the heaven-ly race,
and put a cheer-ful cour-age on.

2. True, ’tis a strait and thorn-y road,
and mor-tal spir-its tire and faint;
But they for-get the migh-ty God,
that feeds the strength of eve-ry saint.


3. O migh-ty God, thy match-less power
is ev-er new, and ev-er young;
And firm en-dures, while end-less years
their ev-er-last-ing cir-cles run.

4. From thee, the ev-er flow-ing spring,
Our souls shall drink a fresh sup-ply;
While such as trust their na-tive strength
shall melt a-way, and droop, and die.

5. Swift as the ea-gle cuts the air,
we’ll mount a-loft to thine a-bode;
On wings of love our souls shall fly,
nor tire a-long the heaven-ly road.


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July 04, 2005

104R Still, Still With Thee

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July 05, 2005

105R The Morning Walks Upon the Earth

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105S Slow Comes the Evening O'er the Hill

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July 06, 2005

106R Those Who Themselves and God Would Know

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July 07, 2005

107R Around Us Rolls the Ceaseless Tide

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July 08, 2005

108R Sun of My Soul

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July 09, 2005

109R Has Not Your Heart Within You Burned

REX GLORIOSE (L.M.)

1. Has not your heart with-in you burned
at even-ing's* calm and ho-ly hour,
as if its in-most depths dis-cerned
the pre-sence of a lof-tier power?

2. Have not you heard mid for-est glades
while an-cient ri-vers mur-mured by,
a voice from the e-ter-nal shades
that spoke a truth from heaven on high?


3. Was it the voice of God speak-ing
in si-lence to your si-lent heart,
per-chance each worth-ier thought bid-ding,
that eve-ry dream of earth de-part?

4. O voice of God, for-ev-er near,
in low, sweet ac-cents whis-pering peace,
make us your har-mo-nies to hear
whose heaven-ly e-choes nev-er cease.

* or 'the dawn's'

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July 10, 2005

110R All Praise to You, My God, This Night

Tune: ALLMAECHTIGER GOTT, L.M., Johann Crueger (1598-1662)

1. All praise to you, my God, this night,
for all the bles-sings of the light!
Keep me, O keep me, King of kings,
beneath your own al-migh-ty wings.


2. When in the night I sleep-less lie,
my soul with heaven-ly thoughts sup-ply;
Let no ill dreams dis-turb my rest,
O Queen of life, my heart con-fessed.

3. Teach me to live, that I may dread
The grave as lit-tle as my bed.
That with the world, my-self and you,
sleep-ing, with peace the soul im-bue.

4. O may my soul on you re-pose,
and with sweet sleep mine eye-lids close,
asleep that may me more vi-gorous make
to serve my God when I a-wake.

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July 11, 2005

111R Now on Land and Sea Descending

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July 12, 2005

112R The Duteous Day Now Closes

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July 13, 2005

113R Softly Now the Light of Day

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July 14, 2005

114R Slowly, By Your Hand Unfurled

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July 15, 2005

115R Unheard the Dews Around Me Fall

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116R Now God Be With Us

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117R Mothering Father, Bless Us

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July 16, 2005

118R Now the Wings of Day Are Furled

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July 17, 2005

119R Again As Evening's Shadow Falls

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July 18, 2005

120R We Give Thanks That the Church

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July 19, 2005

121R Now While the Day in Trailing Splendor

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July 20, 2005

122R The Shadows of the Evening Hours

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July 21, 2005

123R When the Gladsome Day Declineth

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July 22, 2005

124R The Day is Past and Over

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July 23, 2005

125R When Storm Clouds Gather

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July 24, 2005

126R O God, Now to the Holy Name

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July 25, 2005

127R Abide With Me

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July 26, 2005

128R Now the Day is Over

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July 27, 2005

129R By Mitzvot From a Clouded Steep

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July 28, 2005

129S O Mothering Father, God in Heaven

"O Mothering Father, God in Heaven," from the Lord's Prayer, rev. REH (2005), THIS ENDRIS NIGHT (C.M.D.), English carol (15th Cent.), arr. R. V. Williams (1906). Matthew 6:9-13; Luke 11:2-4. The traditional version versus the lyrics here are compared below:

"Our Father, who art in Heaven" O Mothering Father, God in heaven
"Hallowed be thy Name" All hallowed be The Name
"Thy Kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in Heaven" May Love's reign come, God's will be done, on earth ever the same
"Give us this day our daily bread" O Holy One give humankind in every place its bread; it is from Life's bounty each day that all souls should be fed
"And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us" Forgive our transgressions, and teach compassion so we know that wholeness comes forgiving sins of each and every foe
"And lead us not into temptation" And lead us not into evil
"But deliver us from evil" And save us from all sin
"For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen" That glory, reign and power be, for endless worlds; Amen

THIS ENDRIS NIGHT (C.M.D.)

1. O Mothe-ring Fa-ther, God in heaven, all hal-lowed be The Name;
May Love's reign come, God's will be done, on earth ev-er the same;
O Ho-ly One give hu-man-kind in eve-ry place its bread;
It is from Life's boun-ty each day that all souls should be fed.

2. For-give our trans-gres-sions, and teach com-pas-sion so we know
that whole-ness comes for-giv-ing sins of each and eve-ry foe;
And lead us not in-to ev-il, and save us from all sin;
That glo-ry, reign and pow-er be, for end-less worlds; A-men

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July 30, 2005

130R O Day of Rest and Gladness

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August 01, 2005

131R All Beautiful the March of Days

FOREST GREEN (C.M.D)

1. All beau-ti-ful the march of days, as sea-sons come and go;
The hand that shaped the rose has wrought the crys-tal of the snow;
and sent the hoar-y frost of heav'n, the flow-ing wa-ters sealed,
and laid a si-lent love-li-ness on hill and wood and field.


2. O'er white ex-pan-ses spark-ling pure the ra-diant morns un-fold;
The sol-emn splen-dors of the night burn bright-er than the cold;
Life mounts in eve-ry throb-bing vein, love deep-ens round the hearth,
and clear-er sounds the an-gel hymn, 'Good will to all on earth.'


3. O One from whose un-fath-omed law the year in beau-ty flows,
whose self the vi-sion pass-ing by in crys-tal and in rose,
day un-to day does ut-ter speech, and night to night pro-claim,
in ev-er chang-ing words of light, the won-der of The Name.


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August 03, 2005

132R Another Year of Setting Suns

AULD LANG SYNE (L.M.)

1. An-oth-er year of set-ting suns,
of stars by night re-vealed,
of spring-ing grass, of ten-der buds
by win-ter's snow con-cealed.

2. An-oth-er year of sum-mer's glow,
of au-tumn's gold and brown,
of wav-ing fields, and rud-dy fruit
the bran-ches weigh-ing down.

3. An-oth-er year of hap-py work,
that bet-ter is than play,
of sim-ple cares, and love that grows
more sweet from day to day.

4. An-oth-er year to fol-low hard,
where bet-ter souls have trod,
an-oth-er year of life's de-light,
an-oth-er year of God.


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August 04, 2005

133R Tis Winter Now, the Fallen Snow

Words: Samuel Longfellow, alt. REH (2005)Music: DEUS TUORUM MILITUM (L.M.D.), Grenoble Antiphoner (1753); Original tune: BROCKHAM (L.M.), Jeremiah Clark (1709)

DEUS TUORUM MILITUM (L.M.D.)

1. ’Tis win-ter now; the fall-en snow
has left the heavens all cold-ly clear;
Through leaf-less boughs the sharp winds blow,
and all the earth lies dead and drear;
And yet God’s love is not with-drawn;
The Life with-in the keen air breathes,
and Beau-ty paints the crim-son dawn,
and clothes the boughs with glitter-ing wreaths.


2. And though a-broad the sharp winds blow,
and skies are chill, and frosts are keen,
home clos-er draws a cir-cle now,
and warm-er glows the light with-in;
O God! Who does give the win-ter’s cold
as well as sum-mer’s joy-ous rays,
us warm-ly in your love en-fold,
and keep us through life’s win-try days.

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August 05, 2005

134R The Glory of the Spring, How Sweet

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August 06, 2005

134S The Glory of the Spring How Sweet

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August 07, 2005

135R Spring Has Now Unwrapped the Flowers

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August 08, 2005

136R I Walk Amidst Thy Beauty Forth

MORNING SONG (CONSOLATION)(C.M.D.)

1. I walk a-midst the beau-ty forth,
my joy high praise de-clares;
O bless-ings from the bloom-ing earth,
I drink the ver-nal airs.
Those old e-ter-nal hills di-vine,
what migh-ty cheer they breathe!
What ful-ness of de-light sub-lime
the sol-emn stars be-queath!

2. Each won-der of God's hand still makes
my glad-ness fresh and strong;
The glo-ry of my God still wakes
the glo-ry of my song.
When cheer and strength my heart does lack,
and glad-ness makes me whole,
a-midst the sum-mer I win back,
the sum-mer of my soul.

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August 09, 2005

137R Once More the Liberal Year Laughs Out

SUSSEX CAROL (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. Once more the lib-eral year laughs out
o'er rich-er stores than gems or gold;
Once more with har-vest song and shout
is na-ture's blood-less tri-umph told.
Our com-mon Mo-ther rests and sings,
like Ruth, a-mong her gar-nered sheaves;
Her lap is full of good-ly things,
her brow is bright with au-tumn leaves.
To see our Fa-ther's hand once more
re-verse for us the plen-teous horn
of au-tumn, filled and run-ning o'er
with fruit, and flower, and gold-en corn!

2. We shut our eyes, the flowers bloom on;
We mur-mur, but the corn-ears fill,
we choose the sha-dow, but the sun
that casts it shines be-hind us still.
God gives us with our rug-ged soil
the power to make it E-den's prayer,
and rich-er fruits to crown our toil
than sum-mer-wedd-ed is-lands bear.
Oh, fav-ors eve-ry year made new!
Oh, gifts with rain and sun-shine sent
the boun-ty ov-er-runs our due,
the ful-ness shames our dis-con-tent.


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August 10, 2005

138R The Summer Days Are Come Again

FOREST GREEN (C.M.D)

1. The sum-mer days are come a-gain;
once more the glad earth yields
a gol-den wealth of rip'-ning grain,
and breath of clo-ver fields,
and deep'-ning shade of sum-mer woods,
and glow of sum-mer air,
and wing-ing thoughts and hap-py moods
of love and joy and prayer.


2. The sum-mer days are come a-gain;
the birds are on the wing;
God's prais-es, in their lov-ing strain,
un-cons-cious-ly they sing.
We know who bes-tows all the good,
glad-'ning hearts in ac-cord,
for sum-mer joy in field and wood:
we lift our song sky-ward.

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August 11, 2005

139R Summer Suns Are Glowing

ADORO TE DEVOTE (11.11.11.12)

1. Sum-mer suns are glow-ing ov-er land and sea;
Hap-py light is flow-ing, boun-ti-ful and free;
Eve-ry-thing re-joi-ces in the mel-low rays;
Earth's ten thou-sand voi-ces swell ho-ly psalms of praise.


2. God’s free mer-cy does stream ov-er all the world,
And the ban-ner does gleam, by the church un-furled;
Broad and deep and glo-rious, as the heaven a-bove,
shines in might vic-to-rious, O God's e-ter-nal love.


3. O, up-on our sens-es your pure ra-diance pour;
For your lo-ving-kind-ness we would love you more;
And when clouds are drift-ing thick a-cross the sky,
then, the veil up-lif-ting, Sove-reign, O be you nigh.

4. We will ne-ver doubt you, though you veil the light;
Life is dull with-out you; sha-dows with you, bright;
Light of light, shine o'er us on our pil-grim way;
Go now still be-fore us day af-ter end-less day.

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August 12, 2005

140R Praise to God and Thanks We Bring

BENEVENTO (7.7.7.7. D)

1. Praise to God and thanks we bring;
Hearts, bow down, and voi-ces sing!
Prais-es to the Glo-rious One,
all the year of won-der done!
Sing praise for the bud-ding green,
A-pril's res-ur-rec-tion scene;
Sing praise for the shin-ing hours,
star-ring all the land with flowers!

2. Sing praise for the sum-mer rain,
feed-ing day and night the grain;
Sing praise for the ti-ny seed,
hold-ing all the world shall need;
Sing praise for the gar-den root,
mead-ow grass and or-chard fruit;
Praise for hills and val-leys broad,
each the tab-le of our God!

3. Praise God now for snow-y rest,
fall-ing soft on Na-ture's breast;
Praise for hap-py dreams of birth,
brood-ing in the qui-et earth!
For the year of won-der done,
Praise to the All-glo-rious One!
Hearts, bow down, and voi-ces sing,
praise, and love, and thanks we bring.

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August 13, 2005

141R Come, O Thankful People, Come

ST. GEORGE'S WINDSOR (7.7.7.7. D)

1. Come, O thank-ful peo-ple, come, raise the song of har-vest home;
All is safe-ly gath-ered in, ere the win-ter storms be-gin.
God's earth ev-er does pro-vide for our wants to be sup-plied;
Come to God’s own tem-ple, come, raise the song of har-vest home.

2. All the world is God’s own field, fruit un-to prais-es to yield;
Wheat and tares to-geth-er sown un-to joy or sor-row grown.
First the blade and then the ear, then the full corn shall ap-pear;
God of har-vest, grant that we whole-some grain and pure may be.

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August 14, 2005

142R We Plow the Fields and Scatter

MEIRIONYDD (7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6.)

1. We plow the fields, and scat-ter the good seed on the land,
but it is fed and wa-tered by an al-migh-ty hand;
God sends the snow in win-ter, the warmth to swell the grain,
the bree-zes and the sun-shine, and soft re-fresh-ing rain.

2. God is the heaven-ly mak-er of all things near and far,
who paints the way-side flow-er, who lights the even-ing star;
The winds are led by God's hand, from whom the birds are fed;
Much more to us, God's chil-dren, who bes-tows dai-ly bread.


3. We thank you, then, O Sove-reign, for all things bright and good,
the seed time and the har-vest, our life, our health, and food;
No gifts have we to of-fer, for all your love im-parts,
but that which you do de-sire, our hum-ble, thank-ful hearts.

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August 15, 2005

143R Praise to God, Immortal Praise

NUREMBERG (7.7.7.7. D)

1. Praise to God, im-mor-tal praise,
for the love that crowns our days!
Boun-teous Source of eve-ry joy,
Let high praise our tongues em-ploy;
For the bless-ings of the field,
for the stores the gar-dens yield:
Flocks that whit-en all the plain,
yel-low sheaves of ri-pened grain.

2. All that spring with boun-teous hand
scat-ters o’er the smil-ing land;
All that li-beral au-tumn pours
from a rich o’er-flow-ing stores;
These to you, my God, we owe,
Source whence all our bless-ings flow;
And for these my soul shall raise
grate-ful vows and so-lemn praise.

3. And should ris-ing whirl-winds tear
from its stem the ripe-ning ear;
Should the vine put forth no more,
nor the o-lives yield their store;
Yet to you our souls shall raise
grate-ful vows and so-lemn praise;
And, when eve-ry bless-ing’s flown
love you for your-self a-lone.

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August 16, 2005

144S Principia un año nuevo

Original Title: "Another Year is Dawning," Frances Ridley Havergal (1874), CRUCIFIX, 7.6.7.6. D, Anonymous; New Title: "Another Year is Dawning," alt. REH (2005), LLANGLOFFAN, 7.6.7.6. D, D. Evans (1865). A copyrighted translation appears below and in Mil voces para celebrar as no. 367, "Principia un año nuevo," AURELIA, 7.6.7.6. D, Samuel Wesley (1864). The translation, by Esteban Sywulka B. is (c) 1992 Celebremos/Libros Alianza, and appears herein by permission. For other uses of the Spanish translation, contact celebrad@telecom.com.co.

LLANGLOFFAN (7.6.7.6. D)

1. Prin-ci-pia~un año nue-vo; a-yú-danos, oh Dios,
a ser más con-sa-gra-dos, más pres-tos a tu voz;
un a-ño de pro-gre-so y de pros-pe-ri-dad,
un a-ño~en que go-ce-mos tu gran fidelidad.

2. Prin-ci-pia~un año nue-vo; en ti~he-mos de con-fiar
se-gu-ros en tu ma-no po-demos des-can-sar,
y se-a~a-llá con-ti-go, o en la tie-rra a-quí,
que~en to-do siem-pre demos la glo-ria solo a ti.


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144R Another Year is Dawning

Original Title: "Another Year is Dawning," Frances Ridley Havergal (1874), CRUCIFIX, 7.6.7.6. D, Anonymous; New Title: "Another Year is Dawning," alt. REH (2005), LLANGLOFFAN, 7.6.7.6. D, D. Evans (1865). A copyrighted translation appears below the hymn and in Mil voces para celebrar as no. 367, "Principia un año nuevo," AURELIA, 7.6.7.6. D, Samuel Wesley (1864). The translation, by Esteban Sywulka B. is (c) 1992 Celebremos/Libros Alianza, and appears herein by permission. For other uses of the Spanish translation, contact celebrad@telecom.com.co.

LLANGLOFFAN (7.6.7.6. D)

1. An-oth-er year is dawn-ing, dear Sove-reign, let it be
in work-ing or in wait-ing, an-oth-er year with thee.
An-oth-er year of pro-gress, an-oth-er year of praise,
an-oth-er year of prov-ing thy pre-sence all the days.

2. An-oth-er year of mer-cies, of faith-ful-ness and grace,
an-oth-er year of glad-ness ere shin-ing from thy face;
An-oth-er year of ser-vice, of wit-ness for thy love,
an-oth-er year of train-ing for ho-lier work a-bove.

a. Prin-ci-pia~un año nue-vo; a-yú-danos, oh Dios,
a ser más con-sa-gra-dos, más pres-tos a tu voz;
un a-ño de pro-gre-so y de pros-pe-ri-dad,
un a-ño~en que go-ce-mos tu gran fidelidad.

b. Prin-ci-pia~un año nue-vo; en ti~he-mos de con-fiar
se-gu-ros en tu ma-no po-demos des-can-sar,
y se-a~a-llá con-ti-go, o en la tie-rra a-quí,
que~en to-do siem-pre demos la glo-ria solo a ti.

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August 17, 2005

145R O God, Our Help in Ages Past

Words: Isaac Watts (1719), alt.; Music: ST. ANNE (C.M.), William Croft (1708); Paraphrase of Psalm 90: 1-5.

ST. ANNE (C.M.)

1. O God, our help in a-ges past,
our hope for years to come,
our shel-ter from the stor-my blast,
and our e-ter-nal home.

2. Be-fore the hills in or-der stood,
or earth re-ceived its frame,
from ev-er-last-ing thou art God,
to end-less years the same.

3. Un-der the sha-dow of thy throne,
the saints have dwelt se-cure;
Suf-fi-cient is thine arm a-lone,
and our de-fense is sure.

4. A thou-sand a-ges in thy sight
are like an eve-ning gone;
Short as the watch that ends the night
be-fore the ris-ing sun.

5. Time, like an ev-er roll-ing stream,
bears its chil-dren a-way;
They fly, for-got-ten, as a dream
dies at the open-ing day.

6. O God, our help in a-ges past,
our hope for years to come,
be thou our guard while trou-bles last,
and our e-ter-nal home. A-men


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August 18, 2005

146R All Hail, the Pageant of the Years

John Haynes Holmes, O JESU, 8.6.8.6.8.8., Johann Balthazar Reimann (1741), rev. REH (2005). Though there are touches of the Divine here, the images here lie mainly in the humanist realm. All the same, it is absent from Singing the Living Tradition. "Brotherhood" from Hymns of the Spirit Two has become "neighborhood" here.

O JESU (8.6.8.6.8.8.)

1. All hail, the pag-eant of the years
that end-less come and go,
the brave pro-ces-sion of the spheres,
in Time's re-sist-less flow-
A-rise, and crown our days with good,
make us one world-wide neigh-bor-hood!


2. Be-hind us fade the cen-tur-ies
of those who wars would plan,
the fierce and foul fu-til-i-ties
of bat-tling tribe and clan-
A-rise and crown our days with good,
make us one world-wide neigh-bor-hood!

3. A-round us lies the her-i-tage
of clash-ing sword and shield;
The want and waste, the hate and rage
of many a glor-ied field-
A-rise, and crown our days with good,
make us one world-wide neigh-bor-hood!

4. Be-hold, there looms the mys-ter-y
of love di-vin-er far,
there speaks the stead-fast pro-phe-cy
of na-tions freed from war-
A-rise, and crown our days with good,
make us one world-wide neigh-bor-hood!

5. The ae-ons come, the ae-ons go,
the stars nor pause nor cease;
On wings of si-lence, soft as snow,
shall come the boon of peace:
All hail, our days are crowned with good,
make us one world-wide neigh-bor-hood!
A-men.

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August 19, 2005

147R Hail We Now this Happy Morn

Words: Percival Chubb, rev. REH (2005);Music: SONG 13 (GIBBONS) (7.7.7.7.), Orlando Gibbons (1623)

SONG 13 (7.7.7.7.)

1. Hail we now this hap-py morn,
with our faith and hope new-born;
Let our voic-es rise as one,
greet-ing this New Year be-gun.


2. Grate-ful for the fruit-ful past,
may its bright-est fruit-age last;
But our feet would for-ward fare,
up-ward to the clear-er air.

3. From the fu-ture comes a cry,
sound-ing from the up-per sky,
'Live not mere-ly for to-day;
O-thers join you on the way.'


4. So we mount the path a-head;
Let it e-cho to our tread!
All to-geth-er: step in time!
For-ward, for-ward, may all climb!

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August 22, 2005

148R O God, the Rock of Ages

Music: PASSION CHORALE (7.6.7.6. D.), Hans Leo Hassler (1601), harm. J.S. Bach (1729); Paraphrase of Psalm 61.

PASSION CHORALE (7.6.7.6. D)

1. O God, the Rock of A-ges,
who ev-er-more has been,
what time the tem-pest ra-ges,
our dwell-ing place se-rene:
Be-fore the first cre-a-tions,
O You, the same a-bove,
to end-less gen-er-a-tions,
the ev-er-last-ing Love.

2. Our years are like the sha-dows
on sun-ny hills that lie,
or grass-es in the mea-dows
that blos-som but to die;
a-sleep, a dream, a sto-ry
by stran-gers quick-ly told
and un-re-main-ing glo-ry
of things that soon are old.

3. O You, who do not slum-ber,
whose light grows ne-ver pale,
teach us a-right to num-ber
our years be-fore they fail;
On us your mer-cy light-en,
on us your good-ness rest,
and let your spir-it bright-en
the hearts that you have blessed.


4. Love, crown our faith’s en-deav-or
with beau-ty and with grace,
till, clothed in light for-ev-er,
we see you face to face:
A joy no lang-uage mea-sures,
a foun-tain brimm-ing o’er,
an end-less flow of plea-sures,
an o-cean with-out shore.

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August 23, 2005

149R Ring Out, Wild Bells

Title: "Ring Out, Wild Bells," Alfred Tennyson (1849), DEUS TUORUM MILITUM (L.M.), New Title: Same, rev. REH (2005), JERUSALEM (L.M.D), Charles Hubert Hastings Parry.

JERUSALEM (L.M.D.)

Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky,
the fly-ing cloud, the fros-ty light;
the year is dy-ing in the night;
Ring out, wild bells, and let it die.
Ring out the old, ring in the new,
ring, hap-py bells, a-cross the snow:
The year is go-ing, let it go;
Ring out the false, ring in the true.


Ring out false pride in place and blood,
the civ-ic slan-der and the spite;
Ring in the love of truth and right,
ring in the com-mon love of good.
Ring in the va-liant souls and free,
the lar-ger heart, the kind-lier hand;
Ring out the sad-ness of the land,
ring in the Christ that is to be.

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August 30, 2005

150R O Come, O Come, Emmanuel

O Come, O Come Emmanuel, 13th Century Hymn, Psalteriolum Cantionum Catholicarum, 1710, Trans. John Mason Neale, 1854, alt. REH, 2005; VENI EMMANUEL, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Hymnal Noted, Part II, 1856.

VENI EMMANUEL (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. O come, O come, Em-man-u-el,
and ran-som cap-tive Is-ra-el;
that mourns in lone-ly ex-ile here,
un-til a ho-ly child ap-pear.
Re-joice! Re-joice! Em-man-u-el!
Shall come to all, O Is-ra-el!

2. O come, O Wis-dom from on high,
and or-der all things far and nigh,
to us the path of know-ledge show,
and teach us in her ways to go.
Re-joice! Re-joice! Em-man-u-el!
Shall come with-in as Truth to dwell!

3. O come, O Ho-ly One of might,
who to the tribes on Si-nai's height,
in an-cient times did give the law,
in cloud and ma-jes-ty and awe.
Re-joice! Re-joice! Em-man-u-el!
Shall come to us as Hope to dwell!

4. O come, O rod of Jes-se's stem,
from tri-als soon de-liv-er them,
O come, and turn all hearts to peace,
that greed and war at last shall cease.
Re-joice! Re-joice! Em-man-u-el!
Shall come to all as Peace to dwell!

5. O come, O Key of Da-vid, come,
and o-pen wide our heaven-ly home,
make safe the ways that pierce the sky,
and close the path of sor-row's cry.
Re-joice! Re-joice! Em-man-u-el!
Shall come to us as Light to dwell!

6. O come, De-sire of na-tions, bind,
in one the hearts of hu-man-kind,
bid eve-ry sad di-vi-sion cease,
and reign for aye in glo-rious peace.
Re-joice! Re-joice! Em-man-u-el!
Shall come with-in as Love to dwell!

7. O come, O Day-spring come and cheer,
our spir-its by your ad-vent here;
dis-perse the gloom-y clouds of night
and death's deep sha-dows put to flight.
Re-joice! Re-joice! Em-man-u-el!
Shall come to all, O Is-ra-el!

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151R Hail to the One Anointed

Meter, 7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6., Tune, ST. THEODULPH or ELLACOMBE

ST. THEODULPH (7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6.)

1. Hail to the one a-noint-ed, great Da-vid's great-er child!
Hail in the time ap-point-ed, when souls are re-con-ciled!
Who comes to break op-pres-sion, to set the cap-tive free;
To take a-way trans-gres-sion and rule in e-qui-ty.


2. Who comes in suc-cor speed-y to those who suf-fer wrong;
To help the poor and need-y, and bid the weak be strong;
To give them songs for sigh-ing, their even-ings filled with light,
Whose souls, con-demned and dy-ing, are pre-cious in God's sight.


3. The child comes down like show-ers upon the fruit-ful earth;
Love, joy, and hope, like flowers, spring in the path to birth;
And lead-ing, on the mountains, shall peace, the herald, go;
As life re-new-ing foun-tains, from hill to val-ley flow.

4. A-ra-bia's des-ert ran-ger, who wills to bend the knee;
The E-thi-o-pian stran-ger, true glo-ry come to see;
The Ma-gi, prayers im-plor-ing, who gold and in-cense bring;
The na-tions soon a-dor-ing, high praise they long shall sing.


5. O'er eve-ry foe vic-tor-ious, on high-est throne shall rest;
From age to age more glo-rious, all bless-ing and all blest.
The tide of time keeps ev-er the cov-en-ant a-bove;
That name shall stand for-ev-er, whose name to us is love.

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152R Veiled in Shadow Judah Lay

Meter, 7.7.7.7.7.7., Tune, EBELING or DIX.

1. Veiled in shad-ow Ju-dah lay,
Wait-ing for the pro-mised day,
While a-cross the drear-y night
Streamed a flood of glor-ious light,
Heav’n-ly voic-es chant the call,
“Peace on earth, good will to all.”

2. Still the earth in shad-ow lies,
Up from death’s deep vale a-rise
Voic-es of a world in grief,
Prayers of those who seek re-lief:
Now the shad-ow heeds the call,
“Peace on earth, good will to all.”

3. Light of light, we humb-ly pray,
Shine up-on your world to-day;
Break the gloom of our long night,
Fill our souls with love and light,
Send the bless-ed word and call,
“Peace on earth, good will to all.”

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153R As With Gladness, Those of Old

Meter, 7.7.7.7.7.7., Tune, DIX

1. As with glad-ness, those of old
Did the guid-ing star be-hold;
As with joy they hailed its light
Lead-ing on-ward, beam-ing bright:
So, most glor-ious one, may we
Ev-er-more be led to thee.

2. As with joy-ful steps they sped
To that low-ly mang-er bed;
There to bend the knee be-fore
One whom heaven and earth a-dore;
So may we with will-ing feet
Ev-er seek thy mer-cy seat.

3. As they offer-ed gifts most rare
At that mang-er rude and bare;
So may we with ho-ly joy,
Pure and free from sin’s al-loy,
All our treas-ures bring to thee,
And may heav'n-ly prais-es be.

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154R Shepherd, Tell Us of the Night

Original: Watchmen, Tell Us of the Night, John Bowring, 1858, alt. REH, 2008; WATCHMAN, 7.7.7.7.7.7.7.7., Lowell Mason, 1830.

1. Shep-herd, tell us of the night,
What its signs of prom-ise are.
Trav-eller, o’er yon moun-tain’s height,
See that glo-ry-beam-ing star.
Shep-herd, does its beau-teous ray
Aught of joy or hope fore-tell?
Trave-ller, yes—it brings the day,
Prom-ised day of Is-ra-el.

2. Shep-herd, tell us of the night;
High-er yet that star as-cends.
Trav-eller, bless-ed-ness and light,
Peace and truth its course por-tends.
Shep-herd, will its beams a-lone
Gild the spot that gave them birth?
Trave-ller, a-ges are its own;
See, it bursts o’er all the earth.

3. Shep-herd, tell us of the night,
For the morn-ing seems to dawn.
Trave-ller, sor-row takes its flight,
Doubt and ter-ror are with-drawn.
Shep-herd, let thy wand'-rings cease;
Hie thee to thy qui-et home.
Trave-ller, lo! the Roy-al Peace,
Lo! a child of God is come!

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156R O Come All Ye Faithful

Meter, Irregular; Tune, ADESTE FIDELES

1. O come, all ye faith-ful, joy-ful and tri-um-phant,
O come ye, O come ye, to Beth-le-hem.
Lo, bless-ed Christ-child, born to rule the an-gels:
O come in a-dor-a-tion,
O come in a-dor-a-tion,
O come in a-dor-a-tion,
Christ is born!

2. Lo, hum-ble shep-herds, sum-moned to the cra-dle,
leav-ing their flocks, draw near to gaze.
We too will glad-ly fol-low dus-ty foot-steps:
O come in ce-le-bra-tion,
O come in ce-le-bra-tion,
O come in ce-le-bra-tion,
Love is born!


3. Sing, choirs of an-gels, sing in ex-ul-ta-tion;
O sing, all ye cit-i-zens of heaven a-bove!
Glo-ry to God, all glo-ry in the high-est:
O come in ex-ul-ta-tion,
O come in ex-ul-ta-tion,
O come in ex-ul-ta-tion,
Life is born!

4. Bright skies led ma-gi to the child, a-dor-ing,
with gifts of in-cense, gold, and myrrh.
We to the man-ger bring our hearts’ true ques-tions:
Now come in ex-pec-ta-tion,
now come in ex-pec-ta-tion,
now come in ex-pec-ta-tion,
Christ is born!

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September 02, 2005

160R What Means This Glory Round Our Feet

Meter, L.M., Tune, ERFURT (VON HIMMEL HOCH)

1. “What means this glory round our feet,”
The ma-gi mused, “more bright than morn!”
And voic-es chant-ed clear and sweet,
“The roy-al child of peace is born!”

2. “What means this star,” the shep-herds said,
“That bright-ens through the rock-y wall?”
And an-gels an-swering o-ver-head,
sang “Peace on earth, good will to all”

3. All round a-bout our feet shall shine
a light like that the ma-gi saw,
if we our lov-ing wills in-cline
to that sweet life which is the law.

4. So shall we learn to un-der-stand
the sim-ple faith of shep-herds then,
and kind-ly clasp-ing all in all,
sing “Peace on earth, good will to all."

5. And they who to their child-hood cling,
and keep at eve the faith of morn,
shall dai-ly hear the an-gels sing,
"The roy-al child of peace is born."

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September 29, 2005

166R Silent Night

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September 30, 2005

167R Still the Night, Holy the Night

STILLE NACHT (Irregular)

1. Still the night, Ho-ly the night,
all is calm, all is bright;
Round yon faith-ful ten-der pair,
ho-ly in-fant with cur-ly hair;
Sleep in hea-ven-ly peace;
Sleep in hea-ven-ly peace.

2. Still the night, Ho-ly the night,
shep-herds first saw the sight,
heard re-sound-ing, clear and strong,
far and near, the an-gels' song,
Christ, Re-deem-er is here,
Christ, Re-deem-er is here.

3. Still the night, Ho-ly the night,
won-drous star, lend your light;
O an-gels, who God's bles-sings bring;
'Al-le-lu-ia' ever we sing!
Je-sus, Sav-ior is born;
Je-sus, Sav-ior is born.


4. Still the night, Ho-ly the night,
by God's love, by God's might,
the Cre-a-tor sent down grace,
through the Christ child in gentle em-brace
to all child-ren on earth,
to all child-ren on earth.

5. Still the night, Ho-ly the night,
sent down from hea-ven's height;
Love is smi-ling from thy face;
Strikes for us now the hour of grace;
Sav-ior since thou art born;
Sav-ior since thou art born.


6. Still the night, Ho-ly the night,
all shines dim save thy light,
shin-ing where the par-ents mild
keep watch ov-er the ho-ly child;
Sleep in heav-en-ly peace;
Sleep in heav-en-ly peace.

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October 05, 2005

169R Ring, O Ring, O Christmas Bells

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October 07, 2005

171R O Thou In Lonely Vigil Led

Frederick Lucian Hosmer, 1903; alt. REH, 2008; ERFURT (Von Himmel Hoch), L.M., Geistliche Leider, Leipzig, 1539.

1. O thou in lone-ly vi-gil led
To fol-low Truth's new ris-en star
Ere yet the morn-ing skies are red,
And vale and up-land shad-owed are,

2. Pre-pare thy-self and take thy road
And faith-ful to thy vis-ion be:
Trust not in num-bers; none is God,
But one with God: ma-jor-i-ty.

3. Soon pass the judg-ments of the hour,
For-got-ten are the scorn and blame;
The word moves on, a glad-dening power,
And safe en-shrines the prophets' fame.

4. Now, as of old, in low-ly plight
the child of larg-er faith is born:
The watch-ing shep-herds come by night,
And then, the search-ing souls at morn!

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October 08, 2005

172R Thank We Now the God of Heav'n

Original Title: "Thank We Now the Lord of Heav'n," Henry Warburton Hawkes, New Title: "Thank We Now the God of Heav'n," alt. 2008; DIVINIUM MYSTERIUM, 7.7.7.7.7.7.7., 13th Century Plain Song, Mode V.

1. Thank we now the God of heav'n
For the day-spring we've been giv'n;
For the light of truth and grace
Shining from the sov'reign's face.
Still that light is shin-ing on:
Still the ho-ly child is born
Ev-'ry bless-ed Christ-mas morn.

2. Still the words of truth and grace
In a ho-lier world we trace;
Still the an-gels' song is heard:
'Glo-ry be to God on high.'
Sing, ye an-gels from the sky;
Mor-tals raise the gladd'-ning call,
'Peace on earth, good-will to all!'


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172R Thank We Now the God of Heav'n

Original Title: "Thank We Now the Lord of Heav'n," Henry Warburton Hawkes, New Title: "Thank We Now the God of Heav'n," alt. 2008; DIVINIUM MYSTERIUM, 7.7.7.7.7.7.7., 13th Century Plain Song, Mode V.

1. Thank we now the God of heav'n
For the day-spring we've been giv'n;
For the light of truth and grace
Shining from the sov'reign's face.
Still that light is shin-ing on:
Still the ho-ly child is born
Ev-'ry bless-ed Christ-mas morn.

2. Still the words of truth and grace
In a ho-lier world we trace;
Still the an-gels' song is heard:
'Glo-ry be to God on high.'
Sing, ye an-gels from the sky;
Mor-tals raise the gladd'-ning call,
'Peace on earth, good-will to all!'


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October 22, 2005

177R Good Christian Folk, Rejoice

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178R Heir of All the Waiting Ages

Heir of all the wait-ing a-ges,
Hope of a-ges yet to be;
Light to those who dwell in sor-row,
Liv-ing truth to make us free;
Strick-en souls shall know the com-fort
Of your gra-cious min-is-try.

2. An-gel voi-ces in the hea-vens
Joy-ful-ly pro-claim your birth;
Sing-ing a fore-told do-min-ion,
Reign of right-eous-ness and worth;
Songs of proph-e-cy and prom-ise,
Peace, good-will to all on earth.

3. You shall be the great phy-si-cian
For the ills of hu-man-kind;
You shall heal the wound-ed spir-it,
And give strength to mean and kind;
Larg-er life for all who seek it
In the child-like hear and mind.

4. Child of peace, the war-ring na-tions
In your name shall sheathe the sword;
Jus-tice, scorned, for-got-ten, tram-pled,
By your rule shall be re-stored;

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October 23, 2005

179R Lift Up Your Heads

George Weissel, 1642, trans. Catherine Winkworth, alt. REH, 1642; GOTTLOB, ES GEHT, 8.8.8.8.8.8., German Chorale, harm. J.S. Bach, 1747.

GOTTLOB, ES GEHT (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. Lift up your heads, ye migh-ty gates,
Be-hold the child of glo-ry waits;
The roy-al peace is draw-ing near,
The hope of long-ing hearts is here;
Whose life does joy-ful-ness e'er bring,
Where-fore re-joice and glad-ly and sing.

2. Fling wide the por-tals of your heart,
Make it a tem-ple set a-part
From earth-ly use for heav'n's em-ploy,
A-dorned with prayer, and love, and joy;
O pil-grim rul-er guide us on
Til peace on earth for all is won!

3. Oh blest the land, the ci-ty blest,
Where dwells a Christ-child in the breast!
Oh hap-py hearts and hap-py homes
To whom this peace in tri-umph comes!
So shall your sov'-reign en-ter in,
And new and nob-ler life be-gin.

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October 28, 2005

180R All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name

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October 29, 2005

181R From Bethany the Healer

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November 01, 2005

182R Ride On, Ride On, In Majesty

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November 07, 2005

188R O Love Divine, That Stooped To Share

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November 17, 2005

198R All Creatures of the Earth and Sky/Oh, criaturas del buen Dios

Original Title: "All Creatures of Our God and King," Francis of Assisi (1225), trans. W H. Draper, LASST UNS ERFERUEN, 8.8.4.4.8.8.3.3.4.4.4., Geistliche Kirchengesänge (Cologne 1623); New Title: "All Creatures of the Earth and Sky," recast from Umbrian REH (2005), Spanish J. Miguez Bonino, same hymn tune. Under the latter title it appears to LASST UNS ERFERUEN in Singing the Living Tradition as no. 203, albeit with only five stanzas; with even more changes it appears recast by Miriam Therese Winter as no. 17 in The New Century Hymnal as "To You, O God, All Creatures Sing." An abbreviated adaption by Sharon Anway is included in the UUA's Singing the Journey as No. 1066 to the tune YE BANKS AND BRAES under the name "O Brother Sun," to good reviews. The hymn is sometimes perceived as a take on Psalm 148; there are echoes of other psalms as well (such as Psalm 69); however, it most strongly echoes Psalm 100. The Spanish version, originally entitled "Oh, criaturas del Señor," as no. 22, in Mil Voces para celebrar. The redemption, and in some senses, personalization of Nature by St. Francis has a hint of natural theism about it, which no doubt explains the placement of the no. 1066 in the "Earth-Centered Traditions" section of Singing the Journey; that Christianity in some guises might count amongst such traditions ought not be discounted (as the editors seem to recognize implicitly), given the stewardship of the Earth that Genesis 2 bestows upon humankind.

LASST UNS ERFERUEN (8.8.4.4.8.8.3.3.4.4.4.)

1. All crea~tures~of the earth and sky,
Lift up your voice to heaven on high,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
O ra-diant sun with splen~did beam,
O pre-cious moon with sof-ter gleam!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!

2. O rush~ing~wind that blows so strong,
And storms that sail in skies a-long,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
O cher-ished air, in praise~re-joice,
with stars of even-ing, find a voice!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!

3. O use~ful~wat-er, pure and clear,
Make hum-ble sounds for all to hear,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
O fire so spir-it-ful~and bright,
That gives to us both warmth and light!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!

4. Dear kind~red~earth, who day by day,
Un-folds e'er bless-ings on our way,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
The flowers and fruits that in~you grow,
They ho-ly glo-ry a-lso show!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!


5. And all~dear~souls of ten-der heart,
For-giv-ing oth-ers, take your part,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
All who long pain and sor~row bear,
To the Most Ho-ly cast your care!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!

6. And you~most~kind and gent-le Death,
Wait-ing to hush our lat-est breath,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
Who leads to home the child~of God,
Death's Re-deem-er a way has trod!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!

7. Let all~things~the A-noin-ted bless,
And wor-ship God in hum-ble-ness,
Sing prais-es! Al-le-lu-ia!
O praise the Most High, let~praise ring,
Lift up your voice and with all sing!
Sing prais-es, Sing prais-es,
Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia, Al-le-lu-ia!


a. Oh, cri-a~tu-ras del buen Dios,
can-tad con me-lo-dio-sa voz:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-le-lu-_ya!
Ar-dien-te sol con tu ful-gor;
oh, lu-na de sua-ve~es-plen-dor:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-la-bad-le!
¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya!


b. Vien-to ve~loz, po-ten-te~a-lud,
nu-bes en cla-ro cie-lo~a-zul:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-le-lu-ya!
Sua-ve, do-ra~ado a-ma-ne-cer;
tu, man-to, no-che~al ex-ten-der:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-la-bad-le!
¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya!


c. Fuen-tes de~a-gua de cris-tal,
a vues-tro cre-a-dor can-tad:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-le-lu-ya!
Oh, fue-go,~e-le-va tu lo-or,
tú que nos da luz y ca-lor:
¡A-la-bad-le! ¡A-la-bad-le!
¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya! ¡A-le-lu-ya!

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December 02, 2005

204R Strong Son of God, Immortal Love

Original Title: "Strong Son of God, Immortal Love," Alfred Tennyson, SONG FIVE, L.M., First Tune in Hymns of the Spirit Two, Orlando Gibbons (1623), ERNAN, L.M., Second Tune in Hymns of the Spirit Two, Lowell Mason; New Title: "One Born of God, Immortal Love," alt. REH (2005), hymn tune: SONG FIVE, L.M., (1623). Neither the hymn nor the tune appears in Singing the Living Tradition or in The New Century Hymnal, but the hymn does appear in The Hymnal (1940) of the (then thusly named) Protestant Episcopal Church, and other hymnals published throughout the Anglican Communion. Alfred Tennyson was a 19th Century English Anglican and British Poet Laureate from 1850 until his death; his most famous work was perhaps The Charge of the Light Brigade. One hears in the lyrics, "for we walk by faith, not by sight." 2 Corinthians 5:7 (NRSV). Also implicit therein is an answer to the question of Jesus, "who do they say I am?" Matthew 16:13.

SONG FIVE (L.M.)

1. Strong Son of God*, im-mor-tal love,
whom we, that have not seen thy face,
by faith, and faith a-lone, em-brace,
be-liev-ing where we can-not prove.

2. Thou seem-est hu-man and di-vine,
the high-est, hol-iest hu-man, thou.
Our wills are ours, we know not how;
Ours wills are ours, to make them thine.

3. Our lit-tle sys-tems have their day;
They have their day and cease to be;
They are but bro-ken lights of thee,
And thou, O Love, art more than they.

*or 'Thou born of God'

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December 03, 2005

205R Jesus, the Very Thought of You

Original Title: "Jesus, the Very Thought of Thee," Bernard of Clairvaux (12th Century), trans. Edward Caswall (1858), WINDSOR, C.M., Damon's Psalmes (1591); New Title: "Jesus, the Very Thought of You," rev. REH (2005), FIRST MODE MELODY, C.M.D., Thomas Tallis (1505-1585). Bernard in his time was seen as the embodiment of its ideal: that of medieval monasticism at its highest development; he is considered both a saint in the Roman and Anglican churches (he is the patron of bees, beekeepers, candles and wax). The original Latin title is "Jesu, Dulcis Memoria." Caswall was an English Anglican priest, who converted to Roman Catholicism. Neither the hymn nor the tune appears in Singing the Living Tradition, but the hymn does appear under the name "Jesus-The Very Thought to Me," to the tune ST. AGNES in The New Century Hymnal. The lyrics speak of of the Pauline epistles, who tell us to find the joy of God through Jesus. 1 Peter 1:8, Philemon 2:1-11, Romans 5:11, Philippians 2:9-11. Ephesians 3:19, "to know the love of Christ . . . that you may be filled with all the fullness of God," compare with the lyrics "Jesus ... with sweetness fills the breast."

FIRST MODE MELODY (C.M.D.)

1. Je-sus, the ve-ry thought of you
with sweet-ness fills the breast;
But sweet-er far your face to view,
and in your pre-sence rest.
Nor voice can sing, nor heart can frame,
nor can the mem-ory find
a sweet-er sound than your blest name,
bear-er of hu-man-kind!

2. When once you do vi-sit the heart,
then truth be-gins to shine,
then earth-ly van-i-ties de-part,
then kind-les love di-vine.
O Je-sus, light of all be-low,
and fount of liv-ing fire,
sur-pass-ing all the joys we know,
and all we can de-sire.

3. O Je-sus, you beau-ty im-part
of an-gel worlds a-bove;
Your name is mu-sic to the heart,
in-flam-ing it with love.
Je-sus, the ve-ry thought of you
with sweet-ness fills the breast;
But sweet-er far your face to view,
and in your pre-sence rest.

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December 04, 2005

206S Oh Dios, pedimos que nos des

Título original: "Oh nuestro Padre, nuestro Dios," Autor desconocido, ST. AGNES, 8.6.8.6., John Bacchus Dykes (1866); Título nuevo: "Oh Dios, pedimos que nos des," alterado REH (2005), misma tonada.

The hymn "Oh nuestro Padre, nuestro Dios," appears in the United Methodist hymnal Mil voces para celebrar as no. 368, originally with four stanzas, as a hymn for New Years', with no known author, and without copyright. Here the first stanza has been removed (along with any gender references to God), the remaining stanzas re-arranged, as a general-use hymn. Though it was written to ST. AGNES, it is not a translation of 206R herein, direct or otherwise. A relatively close English translation follows, which is meant to give an idea of the Spanish lyrics, but which is not meant to be sung. The lyrics echo the "powers and principalities" language of Paul in Colossians 2:15; there is also a hint of the third petition of the Lord's pray or the prayer of Jesus in Matthew 6:10. A living faith, firm hope, and burning love also suggest St. Paul. Colossians 1:5-8, 1 Corithians 13:3, 1 Thessalonians 1:3. Likewise the passing away of time and goods suggest the passing away of the "temporal" and the persistence of the "eternal" alluded to in 2 Corinthians 4:18.

ST. AGNES (8.6.8.6.)

1. Oh Dios, pe-di-mos que nos des
en tu ser-vi-cio ar-dor;
fir-me es-pe-ran-za,
vi-va fe y más ar-dien-te a-mor.

2. Haz-nos sen-tir la va-ni-dad
de cuan-to e-xis-te a-quí;
gran-de-zas, bie-nes, po-tes-tad
pe-re-ce-rán al fin.


3. El cie-lo, el or-be, el mun-do es-tán
di-cien-do tu bon-dad;
la vi-da, el tiem-po pa-sa-rán
se-gún tu vo-lun-tad. A-mén.

Translation of the Spanish (not to be sung):

1. O God, we ask that you give us
in your most burning service
firm hope, a living faith,
and more ardent love.

2. Make known to us the vanity
of so much that exists here;
Majesty, goods, power
will perish in the end.


3. The heavens, the globe, the world,
are speaking your goodness;
Life and time will pass
according to your will. Amen.

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206R O Love! O Light!

Original Title: "O Love! O Light!", John Greenleaf Whittier (1866), ST. AGNES, C.M., John Bacchus Dykes (1866); New Title: "O Love! O Light!," rev. REH (2005), Same hymn tune. The hymn is not included in either Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal, but the tune does appear as no. 281 and nos. 507-08 in the latter. Whittier was an 19th Century American Quaker poet, and a well-known advocate of the abolition of slavery in the United States. The biblical sources of the names used in the hymn are numerous; John 13:13, John 1:1, John 15:15. Also there is a resonance of St. Paul's hymn that speak of peering "through a glass, darkly." 1 Corinthians 13:12. The feast of Transfiguration is again a topic here.

ST. AGNES (C.M.)

1. O Love! O Life! Our faith and sight
your pres-ence now makes one,
as through trans-fig-ured clouds of white
we trace the noon-day sun.

2. So, to our mor-tal minds sub-dued,
flesh-veiled, but not con-cealed,
we know in you the par-ent-hood
and heart of God re-vealed.


3. We faint-ly know, dim-ly per-ceive,
in dif-fering phrase we pray;
In you, dim or clear, we own free
the Light, the Truth, the Way!


4. To do your will is more than praise,
as words are less than deeds;
and sim-ple trust can find your ways
we miss with chart of creeds.

5. Our friend, our kind-red, and our word,
What may your ser-vice be?
Nor name, nor form, nor ri-tual heard,
but fol-low-ing free-ly.


6. Your li-ta-nies, sweet of-fi-ces
of love and gra-ti-tude;
your sa-cred, di-vine li-tur-gies,
the joy of do-ing good.

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December 05, 2005

207R When Love's Sovereign Sojourned (Here)

Original Title: "When the Lord of Love Was Here," Stopford Augustus Brooke (1881), MISERICORDE (7.7.5.7.7.5.), Robert L. Sanders (1932); New Title: "When Love's Sovereign Sojourned (Here)," rev. REH (2005), Same hymn tune. Neither hymn nor tune appears in either Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. Brooke was a 19th Century Irish writer and churchman, first ordained in the Church of England, but later he officiated as a Unitarian minister at Bedford chapel, Bloomsbury. The hymn recollects the words of Jesus that we are to "love God," and "love our neighbors" (even our enemies) as ourselves, and that all the law and prophets rest on these two commandments. Matthew 22:37, Mark 12:30, Luke 10:27. Also echoed in the hymn is 1 John 4:19-21, which records that Jesus "loved us" before we loved him. The "parables of God" of which Brooke speaks are found through out the gospels, but above all in Mark, chapter 4:1-20, in a series of stories regarding seeds, birds, soil, and the transforming and self-producing power of the earth. "The outcasts" thronging to the Healer bring to mind the story of the Syrophoenician woman in Mark 7:26-30, who, comparing herself with a "dog," argues with Jesus that he heal her daughter as even "dogs under the table eat the children's crumbs;" Jesus agrees. The UUA's Skinner House advises that it considers MISERICORDE to be in the public domain.

MISERICORDE (7.7.5.7.7.5.)

1. When Love's Sove-reign so-journed here,
hap-py hearts grew ev-er near,
though one heart was sad;
Worn and lone-some for our sake,
yet still turned a-side to make
all the wea-ry glad.

2. One who walked the fields, and drew
from the flowers and birds and dew
pa-ra-bles of God;
For with-in that heart of love
all the souls on earth did move,
God had an a-bode.

3. All the out-casts thronged to hear,
all the sor-row-ful drew near
to the Hea-ler's care;
deep and ear-thy were the ways
from which lov-ing grew to praise,
and from giv-ing, prayer.

4. O, be ours that power to keep
in the ver-y heart of grief,
and in tri-al, love;
In our weak-ness to be wise,
and through sor-rows to a-rise
to our God a-bove. A-men.

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December 06, 2005

208R O Jesus, Let Me Walk With You

Original Title: "O Master, Let Me Walk With Thee," Washington Gladden (1879), First Tune in Hymns of the Spirit Two, PLAISTOW, L.M., from Magdalen Hymns (c. 1760), Second Tune in Hymns of the Spirit Two, MARYTON, L.M., Henry Percey Smith (1874); New Title: "O Jesus, Let Me Walk With You," alt. 2008, MARYTON, L.M. Neither the hymn nor the tunes appear in Singing the Leaving Tradition, but the hymn, under the name "O Savior, Let Me Walk With You," to the tune MARYTON, is included in the United Church of Christ's New Century Hymnal as no. 503. Gladden was a Congregationalist minister, well known for his writings and lectures on social concerns during the 19th Century. The metaphor of walking or otherwise following occurs in the Christian Scriptures, in John 1:43, "Follow me," in Ephesians 4:1, where we are told to "lead a life worthy" to that we have been called, and in 1 John 2:6, in the line immediately after the lectionary reading for Easter 2B, in which we are told we "ought to walk as [Christ] walked;" see also Luke 5:11. In the Hebrew Bible, famously, Micah 6:8 tells us what is required is that we "walk humbly" with our God. See also Mark 10:51-52 (NRSV), "Then Jesus said to him, 'What do you want me to do for you?' The blind man said to him, 'My teacher, let me see again.' Jesus said to him, 'Go; your faith has made you well.' Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way."


MARYTON (L.M.)

1. O Je-sus, let me walk with you,
In sim-ple paths of ser-vice true;
Tell me your se-cret; help me bear
The strain of toil, the fret of care.


2. Help me the slow of heart to move
By some clear, win-ning word of love;
Show me the way-ward feet to stay,
And guide them in the home-ward way.


3. Show me your pa-tience; with me be
In clo-ser, dear-er, com-pa-ny,
In work that keeps faith sweet and strong,
In trust that tri-umphs ov-er wrong.

4. In hope that sends a shin-ing ray
Far down the fu-ture’s broad-ening way,
In peace that tru-ly you can give,
With you, O Je-sus, let me live.

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December 07, 2005

209R O You Great Friend

Original Title: "O Thou Great Friend," Theodore Parker (1846), LANGRAN, 10.10.10.10., James Langran (1863); New Title: "O You Great Friend," rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Neither the tune nor the hymn appears in Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal. Theodore Parker was a 19th Century Unitarian minister and social reformer, leader within the "Transcendentalist" school and friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson, perhaps best known for "The Permanent and Transient in Christianity," a sermon given in 1841, on Luke 21:33 "Heaven and earth shall pass away: but my word shall not pass away." That "word," that is, the "truth" which "is still the light," is found in these lyrics; these constitute as well a liberal religious take on John 14:6a (NRSV), "Jesus said ... 'I am the way, and the truth, and the life.'"

LANGRAN (10.10.10.10.)

1. O you, Great Friend, to all the earth's child-ren,
who once ap-peared in humb-lest guise be-low,
sin to re-buke, to break the cap-tive’s chain,
to call the kin-dred forth from want and woe.


2. You would I sing: Your truth is still the light
which guides the na-tions grop-ing on their way,
stum-bling and fall-ing in dis-ast-rous night,
yet hop-ing ev-er for the per-fect day.

3. Yes, you are still the Life; You are the Way;
The hol-iest know— Light, Life and Way of Heaven;
And they who dear-ly hope and deep-ly pray,
toil by the Truth, Life, Way that you have given.

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December 08, 2005

210R A Voice by Jordan's Shore

Original Title: "A Voice by Jordan's Shore," Samuel Longfellow (1864), CAMBRIDGE (S.M.), Ralph Harrison (c. 1784), alt.; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), ST. AUGUSTINE (S.M.D.), from Chorale Songs for Four Voices (1769). Samuel Longfellow, a Unitarian poet, edited the first Hymns of the Spirit (1864); this hymn appeared therein. The hymn nor the tune appears in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal. The lyrics speak to what in Greek is called "metanoia," or what is misleadingly translated as "repentance" in English. Longfellow chose "reform," which is closer to the mark; this new version includes variations on "re-think," lest there be any taint of overly zealous piety. "Metanoia" cried out both John the Baptist in Matthew 3:2, as well as Jesus in Mark 1:15, "the reign of God is near, be new-minded (i.e., repent, or literally, re-think) and believe in this good news." The Jordan and a "baptism of repentance," and a "voice" in the wilderness, elements in the hymn, are all mentioned in Luke 3:3-4.

ST. AUGUSTINE (S.M.D.)

1. A voice by Jor-dan's shore,
'Be new-mind-ed' I hear:
Re-form, re-think, be just e're-more;
God's grac-es ere draw near.
A voice in Gal-i-lee:
'A new mind' now the cheer;
Love God, and neigh-bor too, for see,
God's mer-cies ere draw near.

2. O voice of du-ty, still
speak forth, I hear with awe;
With you I trust a sove-reign will,
o-bey an in-ner law.
O high-er voice of love,
yet speak a word in me;
Through du-ty let me up-ward move,
to your pure li-ber-ty!


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December 09, 2005

211R Not Long on Hermon's Holy Height

Original Title: "Not Long on Hermon's Holy Height," Theodore Claudius Pease (1891), ANGELUS, L.M., Cantica Spiritualia (1847), melody by Georg Joseph (1657); New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Pease was a 19th Century American Congregationalist. Hermon is the name of a mountain, or chain of mountains, in northern Palestine, as in: "The north and the south thou hast created them: Tabor and Hermon shall rejoice in thy name," Psalm 89:12 (KJV). The location of the transfiguration in the New Testament is not explicit; see Matthew 17:1-6; Mark 9:1-8 and Luke 9:28-36; Origen (and other early Church scholars) believed that it occurred, in fact, on Mount Tabor (and close followers of Origen, an early Universalist, are welcome to substitute "Tabor" for "Hermon"). The hymn and the hymn tune do not appear in The New Century Hymnal nor in Singing the Living Tradition.

ANGELUS (L.M.)

1. Not long on Her-mon's ho-ly height,
the heaven-ly vi-sion fills our sight,
we may not breathe that pur-er air,
nor build our tab-er-nac-les there.

2. If with the Teach-er we would go,
our feet must thread the vale be-low,
where dim the lone-ly path-ways wind,
the gold-en glo-ry left be-hind.


3. Where hung-ry souls ask to be fed,
where wand-er-ers cry to be led,
where help-less hearts in chains are bound,
the One Be-loved is ev-er found.


4. There, bend-ing pa-tient o'er a task,
no rai-ment white our eyes shall ask,
con-tent while through each cloud we trace,
the glo-ry of the Rab-bi's face.


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December 10, 2005

212R Christ Calls 'Take Up the Cross'

Original Title: "Thou Say'st, 'Take Up Thy Cross,'" Francis Turner Palgrave (1865), ST. THOMAS, S.M., Aaron Williams (1763); New Title: "Christ Call 'Take Up the Cross,'", rev. REH (2005), OLD 134TH (S.M.), Genevan Psalter (1543), arr. William Crotch (1836). The tune is also known as ST. MICHAEL and CALVIN. The text resonantes with Matthew 4:19(b): "Jesus ... said to them, 'Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.'" Matthew 4:19b (NRSV); see also Luke 5:11. Palgrave was a English Anglican, and also held a chair as professor of poetry at Oxford. The hymn appears neither in Singing the Living Tradition nor in The New Century Hymnal.

OLD 134 (S.M.)

1. Christ calls: 'Take up the cross,
O friends, then fol-low me,'
the night is dim,
the soles worn thin,
yet we fol-low free-ly.

2. Come faint and far the voice,
from vales of Gal-i-lee;
Vi-sion ere fades
in an-cient shades;
how do we serve free-ly?

3. O hea-vy cross of faith,
in what we can-not see,
as once re-store
the self of yore
as we fol-low free-ly.

4. If not as once you came
in true hu-man-i-ty
come yet with-in
as guest a-gain
so we fol-low free-ly.


5. With-in our heart of hearts,
in near-est near-ness be:
Set up a throne
with-in your own,
Christ, we fol-low free-ly.

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December 11, 2005

213S We Who Would Valour See

Original Title: "He Who Would Valiant Be," John Bunyan (1684), mod. Percy Dearmer in the English Hymnal (London 1906), MONKS GATE, 6.5.6.5.6.6.6.5., English Traditional Melody, adapt. Ralph Vaughan Williams (1906); New Title: "We Who Would Valour See," based on John Bunyan's original words, rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. John Bunyan, a Congregationalist and Baptist preacher in England, wrote these words in prison, in his work Pilgrim's Progress, for refusing to conform to the state church. This version uses Bunyan's original capitalization, and makes no use of Dreamer's modifications. The text of resonates with Acts 4:13 and Acts 4:29, in which the "servants" of Jesus are recognized as acting with "boldness" or "constancy," the exact term varying with the translation.

MONKS GATE (6.5.6.5.6.6.6.5.)

1. We who would Va-lour see
Let us come hi-ther;
One here will Con-stant be,
Come Wind, come Wea-ther.
There's no Dis-cour-age-ment,
Shall make us once Re-lent,
Our first a-vow'd In-tent,
To live as Pil-grims.

2. Who so be-set us round,
With dis-mal Sto-ries,
Do but them-selves Con-found;
Our Strength the more is.
No Li-on can us fright,
We'll with a Gi-ant Fight,
But we will have a right,
To live as Pil-grims.


3. Hob-gob-lin, nor foul Fiend,
Can daunt our Spir-it:
We know, we at the end,
Shall Life In-her-it.
Then Fan-cies fly a-way,
We'll fear not what they say,
We'll la-bour Night and Day,
To live as Pil-grims.


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December 12, 2005

213R We Who Would Valiant Be

Original Title: "He Who Would Valiant Be," John Bunyan (1684), mod. Percy Dearmer in the English Hymnal (London 1906), MONKS GATE, 6.5.6.5.6.6.6.5., English Traditional Melody, adapt. Ralph Vaughan Williams (1906); New Title: "We Who Would Valiant Be," rev. REH (2005), same hymn tune. John Bunyan, a Congregationalist and Baptist preacher in England, wrote these words in prison, in his work Pilgrim's Progress, for refusing to conform to the state church; the original title then was "Who Would True Valour See." Dreamer added the phrases "follow the Master" and "Lord, thou dost defend us with thy Spirit" only in 1906. These both become "Savior" in the United Church of Christ version published in the New Century Hymnal, paired with with tune ST. DUNSTAN'S, as no. 494. The version in Singing the Living Tradition, though as here set to the tune MONKS GATE as no. 206, eschews explicit identification of the Divine, in some senses truer to Bunyan than Dreamer (See no. 213S herein). The Dearmer version resonates with John 12:26a (NRSV): "Whoever serves me must follow me, and where I am, there will my servant be also." "When they had brought their boats to shore, they left everything and followed him," Luke 5:11

MONKS GATE (6.5.6.5.6.6.6.5.)

1. We who would va-liant be, come wind, come wea-ther,
fol-low in con-stan-cy the Day-star ev-er.
There’s no dis-cour-age-ment shall make us once re-lent
our first a-vowed in-tent to live as Pil-grims.

2. Who so be-set us round with dis-mal sto-ries
do but them-selves con-found— our strength the more is.
No foes shall stay our might; though we with gi-ants fight,
we will make good our right to live as Pil-grims.

3. Since, God, you e'er de-fend us with your spir-it,
we know we at the end, shall life in-her-it.
Then fanc-ies flee a-way! We’ll fear not what they say,
we’ll lab-or night and day to live as Pil-grims.

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December 13, 2005

214R Rabbi and Worker of Years Past

Original Title: "O Master Workman of the Race," Jay Thomas Stocking (1912), OLD 137TH, C.M.D., One and Fiftie Psalms of David (1556); New Title: "Rabbi and Worker of Years Past," alt. REH (2005), same hymn tune. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition. Stocking was an American Congregationalist. The source of OLD 137TH is also thought to be John Day's Psalter (1553), although this is not what Hymns of the Spirit Two has to say on the matter. The disciples of Jesus called him "rabbi," translated as "magister" in Latin; this appears variously as master, teacher and rabbi in English versions of the Bible; all speak to Jesus' teaching ministry, but only the final designation in English makes clear his identity as a Jewish teacher. The lyrics seem to echo Luke 2:24b (NKJV): "Did you not know that I must be about My Father's business?" "For as a young man marries a young woman, so shall your builder marry you," Isaiah 62:5.

OLD 137TH (C.M.D.)

1. Rab-bi and Work-er of years past, the one from Gal-i-lee,
who with the mind of ear-ly youth sub-lime things did per-ceive,
we give thanks for a child-hood faith that shone a whole life through;
"Did you not know it is my work, and our God's work to do?"

2. O Car-pen-ter of Na-za-reth, Buil-der of life di-vine,
who shapes our lives to God’s own law, your own, the true de-sign,
build us a tower of Christ-like height, that we the land may view,
and, lo, like you, our nob-lest work, the Sove-reign's work to do.


3. O one who does the vi-sion send and ere gives each a task,
and with the task suf-fic-ient strength, show us your will, we ask;
Give us a cons-cience bold and good, give us a pur-pose true,
that it may be our high-est joy, our Sove-reign's work to do.


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December 14, 2005

215R Not Always on the Mount May We

Original Title: "Not Always On the Mount May We," Frederick Lucian Hosmer (1912), TRANSYLVANIA, L.M., arranged from a 16th Century Hungarian Chorale, by Robert Levine Sanders; New Title: Same title, alt. REH (2005), same hymn tune. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but TRANSYLVANIA is paired therein with hymn no. 322, "Thanks Be for These," by the Gilberts. In some ways, the hymn in Singing the Living Tradition is a rewrite of the present hymn using more humanistic images (though not lacking suggestions of the Divine), for example substituting "the Spirit's tidal ebb and flow" with "moments of grief, days of delight, triumph and failure intertwine." Hosmer was an American Unitarian; Richard Seward Gilbert and Joyce Timmerman Gilbert are 20th Century Unitarian Universalists. It is worth pointing out that the earlier hymn fits into what must be an exceedingly limited collection of music, that being "hymns written by Unitarians in North America for Transfiguration Sunday" (the Sunday immediately prior to Ash Wednesday); See Luke 9:29-31.

TRANSYLVANIA (L.M.)

1. Not al-ways on the mount may we
rapt in the heaven-ly vi-sion be:
The shores of thought and feel-ing know
the Spir-it's ti-dal ebb and flow.

2. 'O it is good a-bid-ing here,'
We cry, the heaven-ly pre-sence near:
The vi-sion va-nish-es, our eyes
are lift-ed in-to va-cant skies.

3. Yet has one such ex-al-ted hour
up-on the soul re-deem-ing power,
and in its strength, through af-ter days,
we tra-vel our ap-poin-ted ways,

4. Till all the low-ly vale grows bright,
trans-fi-gured in re-mem-bered light,
and in un-ti-ring souls we bear
the fresh-ness of the up-per air.


5. The mount for vi-sion: but be-low
the paths of dai-ly du-ty go,
and no-bler life there-in shall own
the pat-tern on the moun-tain shown.


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216R Onward, Onward, Though the Region

Original Title: "Onward, Onward, Though the Region," Samuel Johnson (1847), STUTTGART, 8.7.8.7., Christian Friedrich Witt in Psalmodia Sacra (Gotha 1715); New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2005), same hymn tune. Neither the hymn nor the tune appears in Singing the Living Tradition. Prior to its publication in Hymns of the Spirit Two, the hymn was known as "Onward, Christian, Though the Region." Though "Samuel Johnson" is the name of a number of historical figures, indeed even more than one hymnist, this Samuel Johnson was a 19th Century American Unitarian. Beyond the allusion to the Lord's Prayer in Matthew 6:10, there is likewise an echo of Psalm 91:11 (AIV): "For God will command God's angels concerning you to guard you in all your ways."

STUTTGART (8.7.8.7.)

1. On-ward, on-ward, though the re-gion
where you are be drear and lone;
God has set a guar-dian le-gion
ver-y near you; press e'er on.

2. By the thorn road, and none o-ther,
is the mount of vi-sion won;
Tread it, shrink not, sis-ter, bro-ther,
Je-sus trod it; press e'er on.


3. By a trust-ful, calm en-deav-or,
guid-ing, cheer-ing, like the sun,
earth-bound heart, ere shall de-liv-er;
Oh, for their sake, press e'er on.

4. Be this world the wis-er, strong-er,
for a life of pain and peace;
While it needs you, oh, no long-er
pray now for a quick re-lease.

5. Pray that ere your du-ty ful-fill,
that you be the faith-ful one,
by the prayer of Je-sus, 'My will
not, but yours, Ab-ba, be done.'

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217R Not Only Where God's Free Wind Blows

Original Title: "Not Only Where God's Free Wind Blows," Shepherd Knapp (1908), LOBB GOTT, IHR CHRISTEN, 8.6.8.8.6., Nikolaus Hermann, harm. J.S. Bach; New Title: Same hymn title, alt. REH (2005), same hymn tune. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition nor in the United Church of Christ's New Century Hymnal, though the tune does appear to the broadly theistic hymn "Dear Weaver of Our Lives' Design," by Unitarian Universalist Nancy C. Dorian, as no. 22 in the former. Shepherd Knapp was an American Congregationalist. The lyrics seem to echo John 3:8, wherein Jesus is purported to have said that "the wind blows where it chooses, and you hear the sound of it, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who is born of the Spirit." (NRSV)

LOBT GOTT, IHR CHRISTEN (8.6.8.8.6.)

1. Not on-ly where God's free winds blow
or in the si-lent wood,
but where the ci-ty's rest-less flow
is ne-ver still, God's love we know,
and find that pre-sence good.

2. Dear God, the sun whose light is sweet,
on hill and plain and sea,
does cheer the ci-ty's bu-sy street,
and they that pass with wea-ry feet
give thanks for light free-ly.

3. O boun-ties from the field and mine
come at the ci-ty's call;
the fire up-on the heart di-vine
and home, where lights of kind-ness shine,
the dear-est gift of all.

4. More near than out-ward gifts art thou,
Sove-reign of hu-man-kind,
yea, those who un-der bur-dens bow
of toil and care thou dost en-dow
with ri-ches of the mind.

5. But in the ci-ty's grief and shame
dost thou re-fuse a part?
Ah, no, for e're burns there a flame
of hu-man help in Christ's dear name;
There, most of all, thou art.

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218R Where Cross the Crowded Ways (of Life)

Original Title: "Where Cross the Crowded Ways of Life," Frank Mason North (1905), AUCORITATE SAECULI, L.M., Angers Church Melody; New Title: "Where Cross the Crowded Ways (of Life)," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Neither the hymn nor the tune appears in Singing the Living Tradition. North was a Methodist, served as president of the Federal (now National) Council of Churches, and was a native of New York City, whose bustling pace is manifest in these lyrics. Though at odds with Hymns of the Spirit Two, cyberhymnal.org gives the date of publication as 1903 in The Christian City (with the tune as GERMANY, which is how it appears as hymn no. 543 in the United Church of Christ's New Century Hymnal). The site enigmatically notes a biblical allusion to Matthew 22:9. Less obscure might be Matthew 10:40-42 (NRSV): "Whoever welcomes you welcomes me ... and whoever gives even a cup of cold water to one of these little ones in the name of a disciple—truly I tell you, none of these will lose their reward;" see also Mark 9:41. Revelation 21:10, "And in the spirit he carried me away to a great, high mountain and showed me the holy city Jerusalem coming down out of heaven from God," see also Revelation 21:2, Hebrews 11:16. The lyrics "from famished souls ... your heart has never known recoil," bring to mind the story of the persistent Syrophoenician woman in Mark 7:26-30. Though an "gentile," and thus ritually "unclean," Jesus agrees to heal her child all the same.

AUCTORITATE SAECULI (L.M.)

1. Where cross the crowd-ed ways of life,
where sound out cries, hearts race and run;
a-bove the noise of self-ish strife,
we hear your voice, Be-lov-ed One.

2. In haunts of wretch-ed-ness and need,
on shadow-ed thresh-olds full with fears,
from paths where hide the lures of greed,
we catch the vi-sion of your tears.

3. From ten-der child-hood's help-less-ness,
from lone-some grief, and burd-ened toil,
from fam-ished souls, from sor-row's stress,
your heart has ne-ver known re-coil.

4. The cup of wa-ter given for you,
still holds the fresh-ness of your grace;
Yet long these mul-ti-tudes to view
the true com-pas-sion of your face.

5. O Teach-er, from the moun-tain-side
make haste to heal these hearts of pain;
a-mong these rest-less throngs a-bide;
O tread the ci-ty's streets a-gain.


6. Till all earth's child-ren learn to love
and fol-low where your feet have trod,
till, glo-rious from your heaven a-bove,
shall come the Ci-ty of our God!

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218S Entre el vaivén de la ciudad

Título original: "Where Cross the Crowded Ways of Life," Frank Mason North (1905), traductor anónimo, AUCTORITATE SAECULI, 8.8.8.8., Angers Church Melody; Título nuevo: "Entre el vaivén de la ciudad," rev. REH (2005), misma tonada. El himno aparece en el himnario metodista Mil voces para celebrar (1996), como no. 296, y como no. 325 en El Himnario (Church Publishing, 1998), pero con la tonada GERMANY (L.M.). Mateo 10:42 (CST), "Y cualquiera que dé un simple vaso de agua al más humilde de mis discípulos por el hecho de ser discípulo mío, no quedará sin recompensa," véase también Marcos 9:41, Mateo 22:9. Apocalipsis 21:10 (RVR 1995),"Me llevó en el Espíritu a un monte grande y alto y me mostró la gran ciudad, la santa Jerusalén, que descendía del cielo de parte de Dios," véase también Apocalipsis 21:2, Hebreos 11:16. Marcos 7:26, La mujer sirofenicia fue a rogar a Jesús, para que sanara su hija.

AUCTORITATE SAECULI (8.8.8.8.)

1. En-tre el vai-vén de la ciu-dad,
más fuer-te a-ún que su ru-mor;
en lid de ra-za y so-cie-dad,
tu voz o-í-mos, Re-den-tor.


2. Do-quie-ra e-xis-ta ex-plo-ta-ción,
fal-te tra-ba-jo, no haya pan;
en los um-bra-les del te-rror,
Ra-bi-no, vé-mos-te llo-rar.


3. Un va-so de a-gua pue-de ser,
hoy de tu gra-cia, la se-ñal;
mas ya las gen-tes quie-ren ver
tu com-pa-si-va y san-ta faz.

4. Has-ta que triun-fe tu dul-zor
y el mun-do pue-da o-ír tu voz
y de los cie-los, mi a-mor,
des-cien-da la Ciu-dad de Dios.

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219R All My Hope On God Is Founded

Originally set to MEINE HOFFNUNG in Hymns of the Spirit Two at no. 219 under the name "All My Hope on God is Founded;" under the same name it appears as no. 408 in The New Century Hymnal to the tune MICHAEL. The hymn echoes Pslam 62; to some extent 71 and others. "Blessed are those who trust in the Lord, whose trust is the Lord," Jeremiah 17:7 (NRSV)

ALBERT (8.7.8.7.7.7.)

1. All my hope on God is found-ed
who does still my trust re-new,
I through change and chance am guid-ed,
on-ly good and on-ly true.
Deep un-known, who a-lone,
calls my heart to be God's own.

2. Our pride and our earth-ly glo-ry,
sword and crown be-tray-ing trust;
what with care and toil we've built up,
tower and tem-ple fall to dust.
But God's power, hour by hour,
is my tem-ple and my tower.

3. God's great good-ness e'er en-dur-ing;
Holy wis-dom pass-ing thought:
Splen-dor, light and life at-tend-ing,
beau-ty that springs out of naught.
Ev-er-more from God's store
new-born worlds rise and a-dore.


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December 15, 2005

228R When Winds Are Raging

Original Title: "When Winds Are Raging," Harriet Beecher Stowe (1855), ZU MEINEM HERRN, 11.10.11.10., adapted from Johann Gottfried Schicht; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), INTERCESSOR, 11.10.11.10.Charles H. H. Parry, Hymns Ancient and Modern, (1904). Harriet Beecher Stowe was a Congregationalist, and professor at Bowdoin College, Maine, in 1850. She wrote many books, including Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852), an anti-slavery novel. "There remains, then, a Sabbath rest for the people of God,” Hebrews 4:9; For [Christ] is our peace," Ephesians 2:14. "[Jesus] said to them, 'Come away to a deserted place all by yourselves and rest a while,'" Mark 6:31. "When [Jesus] saw that they were straining at the oars against an adverse wind, he came towards them early in the morning, walking on the sea . . . Then he got into the boat with them and the wind ceased," Mark 6:48, 50; see also John 6:18-20. "Remember, O Lord, how your servant is taunted; how I bear in my bosom the insults of the peoples, with which your enemies taunt, O Lord, with which they taunted the footsteps of your anointed," Psalm 89:50-51; compare the lyrics "the babble of life’s angry voices."

INTERCESSOR (11.10.11.10)

1. When winds are rag-ing o’er the up-per o-cean,
and bil-lows wild con-tend with an-gry roar,
’tis said, far down, be-low the wild com-mo-tion,
that peace-ful still-ness reign-eth ev-er-more.

2. Far, far be-neath, the noise of tem-pests dieth,
and sil-ver wa-ves chime ev-er peace-ful-ly,
and no rude storm, how fierce so e’er it fli-eth,
dis-turbs the sab-bath of that deep-er sea.

3. So to the heart that knows thy love, O Pur-est!
there is a tem-ple, sa-cred ev-er-more,
and all the bab-ble of life’s an-gry voi-ces
dies in hushed still-ness at its peace-ful door.

4. Far, far a-way, the roar of pas-sion di-eth,
and lov-ing thoughts rise calm and peace-ful-ly,
and no rude storm, how fierce so e’er it fli-eth,
dis-turbs the soul that dwells, Ho-ly, in thee.

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December 20, 2005

249R In Heavenly Love Abiding

Original Title: "In Heavenly Love Abiding," Anna Laetitia Waring (1850), NYLAND, 7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6., Finnish Hymn Melody; New Title: Same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), VALET WILL ICH DIR GEBEN, 7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6., Melchior Teschner (1613). Loose paraphrase of Psalm 23; see also John 15:10, "If ye keep my commandments, ye shall abide in my love." Waring was born a Quaker in Wales; she later became a member of the Church of England.

VALET WILL ICH DIR GEBEN (7.6.7.6.7.6.7.6.)

1. In heaven-ly love a-bid-ing, no change my heart shall fear.
and safe in such con-fid-ing, for noth-ing chang-es here.
The storm may roar with-out me, my heart may low be laid,
but God is round a-bout me; how can I be dis-mayed?

2. Wher-ev-er love may guide me, no want shall turn me back.
My shep-herd is be-side me, and no-thing can I lack.
Your wis-dom's ev-er wak-ing, your sight is al-ways clear,
you know the way you're tak-ing; we'll walk there and then cheer.

3. Green pas-tures are before me, which yet I have not seen.
Bright skies will soon be o'er me, where thick-est clouds have been.
My hope I can-not mea-sure, my path to life is free.
My guide has all my trea-sure, the one who walks with me. A-men.

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December 21, 2005

250R Dear God and Weaver of the Soul

Old Title: "Dear Lord and Father of Mankind," John Greenleaf Whittier (1872), REST, 8.6.8.8.6, New Title: Dear God and Weaver of the Soul, rev. REH (2007), same hymn tune. See Psalm 139.

1. Dear God and Wea-ver of the soul,
for-give our fool-ish ways;
Re-clothe us in a grace-ful role,
in pur-er lives thy ser-vice find,
in deep-er rev-erence, praise.

2. In sim-ple trust like theirs who heard,
be-side the Syr-ian sea,
the free-ing pro-mise of the Lord,
let us, like them, with-out a word,
rise up and fol-low thee.

3. O Sab-bath rest by Gal-i-lee,
O calm of hills a-bove,
where Jes-us knelt to share with thee
the si-lence of e-ter-ni-ty,
in-ter-pret-ed by love!

4. So-phi-a's hush* sub-du-ing all
our words and works that drown
the ten-der whis-per of thy call,
as noise-less let thy bless-ing fall
As fell thy man-na down.

* Divine Wisdom

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250S Oh Tejadora eternal

Letra: John Greenleaf Whittier, trad. Nicolás Martínez, rev. REH; Tonada: REST, 8.6.8.8.6. Vease Salmo 139.

1. Oh Tejadora eternal
Pedimos tu perdón!
Renuévanos con paz real
Y así en belleza espiritual
Te adore el corazón.

2. Permítenos que al escuchar
El eco de tu voz,
También podamos contestar
Tal como aquellos junto al mar,
Siguiendo de ti en pos.


3. ¡Oh, danos la serenidad
Con que venció Jesús!
Silencio de la eternidad
Que halló al hacer tu voluntad,
Subiendo a la luz.

4. En tentaciones o ansiedad,
Tu calma pon, Señor.
Podamos en serenidad,
O en la más ruda tempestad
Oir tu voz de amor.

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January 01, 2006

262R Now Thank We All Our God

Original Title: "Now Thank We All Our God," Martin Rinkart (1636), trans. Catherine Winkworth (1858), NUN DANKET, 6.7.6.7.6.6.6.6., Johann Crüger (1647), harm. Mendelssohn; New Title: "Now Thank We All Our God," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. One of the best-known hymns of the Church Universal. It appears as a two-stanza hymn in Singing the Living Tradition, at no. 32; it appears without parental metaphors in The New Century Hymnal, at no. 419. It echoes both Psalm 67, and other psalms.

NUN DANKET (6.7.6.7.6.6.6.6.)

1. Now thank we all our God, with heart and hands and voi-ces,
who won-drous things has done, in whom this world re-joi-ces;
who from our par-ents’ arms has blessed us on our way
with count-less gifts of love, and still is ours to-day.


2. O may this boun-teous God through all our life be near us,
with ev-er joy-ful hearts and bless-èd peace to cheer us;
and keep us in true grace, and guide us when per-plexed;
and free us from all ills, in this world and the next!

3. All praise and thanks to God the Fa-ther and the Mo-ther;
The one E-ter-nal God, who joins us to each oth-er;
The all-re-deem-ing Life, whom earth and heaven a-dore;
for thus it was, is now, and shall be ev-er-more.

Some congregations may wish to attempt one or more of the original German stanzas (the editors of the website would be happy to create scores for these upon request):

1. Nun dank-et al-le Gott
mit Herz-en, Mund und Händ-en,
der gro-sse Ding-e tut
an uns und al-len End-en;
Der uns von Mut-ter-leib
und Kind-es-bein-en an
un-zäh-lig viel zu gut
bis hie-her hat ge-tan.

2. Der e-wig reich-e Gott
woll uns in uns-erm Leb-en
ein Imm-er fröh-lich Herz
und ed-len Fried-en geb-en,
und uns in sein-er Gnad
er-halt-en fort und fort
und uns aus al-ler Not
er-lös-en hier und dort.

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264R Thou Gracious Power

Lyrics: Oliver Wendell Holmes (1869), L.M.
http://www.bruederbewegung.de/midi/145.mid
Tune: HERR, LENKE UNSERN SINN EMPOR, Johann Heinrich Egli (1790)
Hymns of the Spirit Two calls this ES KAM DIE GNADENVOLLE

ES KAM DIE GNADENVOLLE (L.M.)

1. Thou gra-cious Power, whose mer-cy lends
the light of home, the smile of friends,
our gath-ered flock thine arms en-fold
as thou didst keep thy folk of old.

2. Wilt thou not hear us while we raise,
in sweet ac-cord of sol-emn praise,
the voi-ces that have ming-led long
in joy-ous flow of mirth and song?

3. For all the bless-ings Life has brought,
for all its sor-rowing hours have taught,
for all we mourn, for all we keep,
the hands we clasp, the loved that sleep.

4. The noon-tide sun-shine of the past,
these brief, bright mo-ments fad-ing fast,
the stars that gild our ram-bling years,
the twi-light ray from hol-ier spheres.

5. We thank thee, Friend; O let thy grace
our nar-rowing cir-cles still em-brace,
thy mer-cy shed its heaven-ly store,
thy peace be with us ev-er-more. A-men

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282R O Free Church Beyond Fixed Creeds

Original Title: "Christian, Rise, and Act Thy Creed," Francis Albert Rollo Russell (1893), NUREMBERG, 7.7.7.7., adapted from Rudolph Ahle (1664); New Title: "O Free Church Beyond Fixed Creeds," rev. REH (2006), GOTT SEI DANK, 7.7.7.7., Johann A. Freylinghausen (1704). A fellow in the (British) Royal Meterological Society, Rollo's hymns appeared in the aptly named collection Break of Day. James 2:14-15 (NRSV), "What good is it, my brothers and sisters, if you say you have faith but . . . a brother or sister is naked and lacks daily food . . . and yet you do not supply their bodily needs, what is the good of that?" Rollo was, perhaps contrary to expectation, a Unitarian (a fact which the otherwise thorough custodians at cyberhymnal.com do not mention). Despite that, it does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but does appear in The New Century Hymnal, as no. 537, under the name "Christian, Rise, and Act Your Creed," to the tune INNOCENTS.

GOTT SEI DANK (7.7.7.7.)

1. O Free Church be-yond fixed creeds;
let your prayer be in your deeds;
seek the right, per-form the true,
raise your works and life a-new.

2. Hearts a-round you charged with care;
what can help their load to bear?
What can bring in-spir-ing power,
arm their fal-tering wills this hour?

3. Let your aims be hope and joy,
and your wor-ship God’s em-ploy,
rais-ing thanks in hum-ble zeal,
learn-ing ho-ly love to feel.

4. Come, O guide di-vine, and reign;
free-ing faith as-sailed in vain,
per-fect love be-reft of fear,
born in heaven and ra-diant here.

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319 Once To Every Soul and Nation

Lyrics: James Russell Lowell (1844), adapted in Hymns of the Spirit (1938); Music: TON-Y-BOTEL, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., T. J. Williams; lyrics revised by REH (2008).

1. Once to eve-ry soul and na-tion,
Comes the mo-ment to de-cide,
In the strife of truth with false-hood,
For the good or e-vil side;
Some great cause, God's new mes-siah,
Of-fering each the bloom or blight,
And the choice es-capes then from us,
'Twixt that night-fall and that light.

2. Then to side with truth is no-ble,
When we share its wretch-ed crust,
Ere that cause bring fame and prof-it,
And 'tis pros-perous to be just;
Then it is the brave one choos-es,
While the cow-ard stands a-side,
Till the mul-ti-tude make vir-tue,
Of the faith they had de-nied.

3. By the burn-ing light of mar-tyrs,
Christ, thy bleed-ing feet we track,
Toil-ing up new Cal-varies ev-er,
With the cross that turns not back;
New oc-ca-sions teach new du-ties,
Time makes an-cient good un-couth;
They must up-ward still and on-ward,
Who would keep a-breast of truth.

4. Though the cause of e-vil pros-per,
Yet 'tis truth a-lone is strong;
Though its por-tion be the scaf-fold,
And up-on the throne be wrong;
Yet that scaf-fold sways the fu-ture,
And, be-hind dim, name-less strife
Waits the Sove-reign 'midst the sha-dow,
Keep-ing watch a-bove all life.

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327R All Blessings Are Scattered

Original Title: "The Lord, In His Righteousness," Katharine Huntington Annin (1923), NETHERLANDS FOLKSONG, Irregular, Traditional Melody; New Title: "All Blessings Are Scattered," rev. REH (2006), DOWN AMPNEY, 6.6.11.6.6.11., Ralph Vaughn Williams (1906). Annin was an American Congregationalist. The revised version switches the position of stanzas one and two; thus the wholly dissimiliar names. "And this is the name by which he will be called: 'The Lord is our righteousness,'" Jeremiah 23:6. Luke 4:14-18, "The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to bring good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim release to the captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to let the oppressed go free;" see also Isaiah 61:1. The hymn does not appear in either Singing the Living Tradition nor The New Century Hymnal.

DOWN AMPNEY (6.6.11.6.6.11.)

1. All bles-sings are scat-tered like rains from high~est heav-ens;
like dews on the fields when the grass is new mown;
peace is de-scend-ing, a~bun-dant, nev-er en-ding;
pris-oners and op-pressed are count-ed as God's own.

2. Sove-reign of right-eous-ness judg-eth all with~all jus-tice,
the moun-tains and hills by God's reign are se-cure;
peo-ples of all~na-tions through-out ge-ne-ra-tions
shall sing praise as long as the Sun shall en-dure.

3. From sea to sea shall be Love's true do-min-ion spread,
from the ends of the Earth to where riv-ers run;
the isles of deep~o-ceans shall of-fer de-vo-tions,
Ru-lers shall bow down, and all lands pray as one.

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328R O Pure Reformers, Not in Vain

Original Title: "O Pure Reformers, Not in Vain," John Greenleaf Whittier (1843), COVENTRY, C.M., Samuel Howard (c. 1762); New Title: same hymn title, rev. REH (2006), ST. ANNE, C.M., William Croft (1708). Whittier was an 19th Century American Quaker poet, and a well-known advocate of the abolition of slavery in the United States. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal. Though the hymn predates both his ministry and the holiday, many may find it appropriate to commemorate the life of Martin Luther King, Jr. The lyrics speak most directly to Ephesians 4:11-16, which tells of prophets and teachers sent to "equip the saints" so that we might not be like children "tossed here and there by waves, and carried about by every wind of doctrine." Also notable are echoes of the conflict between "lies" and "truth" in the gospel of John, see John 17:17, John 8:44.

ST. ANNE (C.M.)

1. O pure re-form-ers! not in vain,
your trust in hu-man-kind;
the good which blood-shed could not gain,
your peace-ful zeal shall find.


2. The truths you urge are borne a-broad
by eve-ry wind and tide;
the voice of na-ture and of God
speaks out up-on your side.

3. The wea-pons which your hands have found
are those which heaven has wrought,
light, truth, and love; your bat-tle ground,
the free, broad field of thought.

4. O may no self-ish pur-pose break
the beau-ty of your call,
no lie from throne or al-tar shake
your stead-y faith in all.


5. Press on! and if we may not share
the glo-ry of your cry,
we'll ask at least, in earn-est prayer,
that your dreams may not die. A-men.

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331R Onward Christian Soldiers

It may surprise some to learn that Hymns of the Spirit Two (1937) included "Onward Christian Soldiers" in addition to "Forward Through the Ages" for use by Unitarians and Universalists, given its absence from later denominational hymnals published by the Unitarian Universalist Association, and indeed given its absence from hymnals lately published other moderate and liberal Christian groups. Below are lyrics that take on a nearly impossible (and mostly thankless) task, seeking to be true to the original's "church militant" imagery while being useful for worship in the liberal church. Although the original lyrics were neutral, in content, on the efficacy of war, the images in the minds of some have not seemed neutral (many hear "off to war" rather than "as to war" in the hymn's first line, for example). The revised lyrics have sought to make clearer this neutrality, and make a bit more explicit the spiritual and moral goals of the liberal church.

ST. GERTRUDE, 6.5.6.5.6.5.6.5.6.5.6.5

1. On-ward, Christ-ian sol-diers, march-ing as to war,
With the crown of jus-tice go-ing on be-fore.
Christ, the roy-al rab-bi, leads a-gainst the flow;
For-ward through dis-trac-tion see love's mes-sage go!
On-ward, faith-ful sol-diers, on-ward, we im-plore,
With the crown of jus-tice go-ing on be-fore.

2. Like a swift up-ris-ing moves the church of God;
Kin-dred, we are tread-ing where the saints have trod.
May we be u-nit-ed, all one bo-dy be,
One in hope and free-dom, one in char-i-ty.
On-ward, faith-ful sold-iers; whose hearts on high soar,
With the crown of jus-tice, go-ing on be-fore.

3. Rich re-gimes may per-ish, thrones may rise and wane,
But the church of free-dom con-stant will re-main.
Tri-als shall not ev-er 'gainst that church pre-vail;
We have Christ’s own pro-mise, and that shall not fail.
On-ward, faith-ful sol-diers, dream-ing war no more,
With the crown of jus-tice, go-ing on be-fore.

4. On-ward then, all peo-ples, join our hap-py throng,
Blend with ours your voi-ces in this good-will song.
Glo-ry, laud and hon-or to your God do bring,
This through count-less a-ges, earth and an-gels sing:
On-ward, on-ward, sol-diers, seek peace ev-er-more,
With the crown of jus-tice, go-ing on be-fore!

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342R Turn Back

Original Title: "Turn Back, O Man, Forswear Thy Foolish Ways," Clifford Bax, OLD 124TH (10.10.10.10), Genevan Psalter (1551); New Title: "Turn Back," rev. REH (2008), same hymn tune. Ezekiel 18:32 (NRSV), "For I have no pleasure in the death of anyone, says the Lord God. Turn, then, and live;" 2 Samuel 1:7-8, "Hannah wept and would not eat. Her husband Elkanah said to her, “Hannah, why do you weep? Why do you not eat? Why is your heart sad?" 2 Samuel 7:10, "And I will appoint a place for my people Israel and will plant them, so that they may live in their own place, and be disturbed no more; and evildoers shall afflict them no more;" 2 Samuel 18:7-8, "The men of Israel were defeated there by the servants of David, and the slaughter there was great on that day, twenty thousand men. The battle spread over the face of all the country;" 2 Samuel 23:3-4, "One who rules over people justly, ruling in the fear of God, is like the light of morning." See also Matthew 6:9-13; Luke 11:2-4. The hymn appears in Singing the Living tradition as hymn no. 120 also as "Turn Back;" it differs from the words here inasmuch as the SLT version assigns earth definitively to the "neutral" pronoun "it," rather than leaving earth's gender ambiguous as here. The words below likewise do not make use of the adjective "fair" in describing the earth, unlike in SLT and in the original version.

OLD 124TH (10.10.10.10)

1. Turn back, turn back, for-swear thy fool-ish ways;
Old now is earth, and none may count the days;
Yet thou, earth's child, whose head is crowned with flame;
Still wilt not hear thine in-ner God pro-claim,
"Turn back, turn back, for-swear thy fool-ish ways."

2. Earth might be free; all peo-ple glad and wise;
Age after age our tra-gic em-pires rise;
Built while we dream, and in that dream-ing weep:
Would we but wake from out our haunt-ed sleep;
Earth might be free; all peo-ple glad and wise.

3. Earth shall be free, and all earth's peo-ple one:
Nor till that hour shall God's whole will be done.
Now, even now, once more from earth to sky;
Peals forth in joy the old un-daunt-ed cry:
"Earth shall be free and all earth's folk be one!"

All materials may be reproduced for non-profit local and congregational use. We request notification of use, in addition to notification of any changes made when materials are used so we might benefit from the insight of others. Any materials used or reproduced in any way must bear the notation "(c) 2008 Richard E. Hurst, for non-profit local and congregational use only, all other rights reserved."

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January 02, 2006

349R Eternal Ruler of the Ceaseless (Round)

Original Title: "Eternal Ruler, of the Ceaseless Round," John White Chadwick (1864), first tune, SONG 1, 10.10.10.10.10.10., (alternative FFIGYSBREN), Orlando Gibbons (1623), second tune STOCKPORT (YORKSHIRE), 10.10.10.10.10.10., John Wainwright (1750); New Title: "Eternal Ruler, of the Ceaseless (Round)," rev. REH (2006), STOCKPORT (YORKSHIRE), 10.10.10.10.10.10. Chadwick was a 19th Century American Unitarian minister, who was graduated from Harvard Divinity in 1864, and ordained at Second Unitarian in Brooklyn; he wrote for both the AUA publication The Christian Register and Harper's. The New Century Hymnal and Singing the Living Tradition do not contain the hymn. "The glory which thou gavest me I have given them; that they may be one, even as we are one," John 17:22 (KJV). Ephesians 2:17-19 (NRSV), "So [Christ] came and proclaimed peace to you who were far off and peace to those who were near; through him both of us have access in one Spirit to the Father. So then you are no longer strangers and aliens, but you are citizens with the saints and also members of the household of God." "Then [Jesus] got into the boat with them and the wind ceased," Mark 6:51," compare "let wind or weather be" in the last verse. 2 Corinthians 5:18, "All this is from God, who reconciled us to himself through Christ, and has given us the ministry of reconciliation."

STOCKPORT (YORKSHIRE)(10.10.10.10.10.10.)

1. E-ter-nal Ru-ler of the cease-less round
of circ-ling pla-nets sing-ing on their way,
Guide of the na-tions from the night pro-found
in-to the glo-ry of the per-fect day;
rule in our hearts, that we may ev-er be
guid-ed and held by you and loved free-ly.


2. We are all yours, the chil-dren of your love,
the kind-red of your long-ex-pect-ed child;
des-cend, O ho-ly spir-it, like a dove
in-to our hearts, that we be re-con-ciled;
as one with you, to whom we ev-er tend;
as one with your be-lov-èd, our true friend.

3. We would be one in ha-tred of all wrong,
one in our love of all things sweet with care;
one with the joy that e'er breaks in-to song,
one with the grief that tremb-les in-to prayer,
one in the power that makes your chil-dren free
to fol-low truth, ev-er in li-ber-ty.

4. O clothe us with your heaven-ly ar-mor too,
your trus-ty shield, your sword of ho-ly love;
our in-spir-a-tion be your known word's due;
we ask no vic-tor-ies not from a-bove;
give or with-hold, let wind or wea-ther be,
e-nough to know that we do serve free-ly.

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January 03, 2006

380R God of the Ages, Known of Old

Old Title: "God of our Fathers, Known of Old," Rudyard Kipling (1897), FOLKINGHAM, 8.8.8.8.8.8., from the Supplement to the New Version, Nahum Tate & Nicholas Brady (1700), alt. MELITA, 8.8.8.8.8.8., John Bacchus Dykes (1861); New Title: "God of the Ages, Know of Old," rev. REH (2006), FOLKINGHAM, 8.8.8.8.8.8. The words were originally written as the poem "Recessional," and published in the London Times during Queen Victoria’s Jubilee celebration. They were also sung at Kipling’s funeral, under the title "God of our Fathers, Known of Old." They have been "modernized" and made "American" here, with the funeral of former President Gerald Ford in mind (though many other uses suggest themselves).

FOLKINGHAM (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. God of the a-ges, known of old;
You of our far-flung bat-tle line,
be-neath whose aw-ful hand we hold
do-mi-nion ov-er palm and pine:
God of our fa-thers, be here yet,
lest we for-get, lest we for-get!

2. The tu-mult and the shout-ing dies;
The cap-tains and news crews de-part:
Still stands an an-cient sa-cri-fice,
a hum-ble and a con-trite heart.
God of our moth-ers, be here yet,
lest we for-get, lest we for-get!

3. Far called, the na-vies melt a-way,
on dune and head-land sinks the fire:
Lo, all the pomp of yes-ter-day
is one with Ni-ne-veh and Tyre!
Judge of the na-tions, spare us yet,
lest we for-get, lest we for-get!

4. If, drunk with sight of power, we loose
wild tongues that have not you in awe,
such boast-ings as the pride-ful use,
or ones who have ig-nored your law:
O God of hosts, be with us yet,
lest we for-get, lest we for-get!

5. Un-think-ing hearts that put their trust
in blink-ing screen and ir-on shard,
all val-iant dust that builds on dust,
and guard-ing, calls not you to guard,
for fran-tic boast and fool-ish word:
Have mer-cy on all peo-ple, God!

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January 04, 2006

413R In Christ There Is No East or West

Title: "In Christ, There Is No East or West," Words: John Oxenham (1908), rev. REH (2006); Music: McKEE (C.M.D.), African-American spiritual, arranged by Harry T. Burleigh. "Then [Jesus] took a little child and put it among them; and taking it in his arms, he said to them, Whoever welcomes one such child in my name welcomes me." Mark 9:36-37.

McKEE (C.M.D.)

1. In Christ there is no East or West,
In Christ no South or North;
But one great com-mon-wealth of love
through-out the whole-wide earth.
In Christ shall true hearts eve-ry-where
their true com-mun-ion find;
Christ's ser-vice is the gol-den cord,
close bind-ing hu-man-kind.


2. Join hands, then, mem-bers of all faiths,
what-ever your na~tion may be!
Who serves the Sove-reign as a child
is sure-ly kin to me.
In Christ now meet both East and West,
In Christ meet North and South;
All faith-ful souls are one in love,
through-out the whole-wide earth.

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431R All Souls, O God, Are Thine

Original Title: "All Souls, O Lord, Are Thine," Epes Sargent (1813-1880), LANGRAN, 10.10.10.10., James Langran (1863); New Title, "All Souls, O God, Are Thine," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Sargent was a Universalist minister in the United States. "[Christ] has made known to us the mystery of his will, according to his good pleasure that he set forth in Christ, as a plan for the fullness of time, to gather up all things in him, things in heaven and things on earth," Ephesians 1:9-10. "But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels, for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honor; that he, by the grace of God, should taste death for every man," Hebrews 2:9. "And he is the propitiation for our sins; and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world," 1 John 2:2. "The Savior of all, especially those who believe." 1 Timothy 4:10. "God [is] All in All," 1 Corinthians 15:28. The hymn does not appear in The New Century Hymnal nor (astonishingly) in Singing the Living Tradition.

LANGRAN (10.10.10.10.)

1. All souls, O God, are thine, as-sur-ance blest!
Thine, not our own to rob of help di-vine;
not ours to doom by an-y hu-man test,
but thine, O gra-cious God, and on-ly thine.

2. Thine, by thy va-rious dis-ci-plines, to lead
to heights where heaven-ly truths im-mort-al shine,
truths none e-ter-nal-ly shall fail to heed;
for all, O God, are thine, for-ev-er thine.

3. For-give the thought, that ev-er-last-ing ill
to a-ny can be part of thy de-sign;
fi-nite, im-per-fect, er-ring, guil-ty-- still
all souls, great God, are thine-- and mer-cy thine. A-men.

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447R O God, Unseen

Original Title: "O God, Unseen But Ever Near," Edward Olser, Samuel Longfellow (1864), GRÄFENBURG, C.M., Johann Crüger (1653); New Title: "O God, Unseen," alt. REH (2006), same hymn tune. Exodus:16:3-4,"'If only we had died by the hand of the Lord in the land of Egypt, when we sat by the fleshpots and ate our fill of bread; for you have brought us out into this wilderness' . . . Then the Lord said to Moses, 'I am going to rain bread from heaven for you.'" "The invisible God," Colossians 1:15. John 6:48, 51, "I am the bread of life." "I cannot perceive [God]," Job 23:8. The hymn does not appear in either The New Century Hymnal nor Singing the Living Tradition.

GRÄFENBURG (C.M.)

1. O God, un-seen but ev-er near,
our bless-ed rest are thou;
and we, in love that has no fear,
take re-fuge with thee now.

2. All soiled with dust our pil-grim feet
and wea-ry with the way;
we seek thy shel-ter from the heat
and burd-en of the day.

3. O wel-come in the wil-der-ness
the sha-dow of thy love;
the stream that springs our thirst to bless,
the man-na from a-bove!

4. A-while be-side the fount we stay
and eat this bread of thine,
then go re-joic-ing on our way,
re-newed with strength di-vine.

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470R God, Dismiss Us With Your Blessing

Original Title: Lord, Dismiss Us With Thy Blessing; New Title: God, Dismiss Us With Your Blessing; ascribed to John Fawcett, 1773; alt. REH, 2008; SICILIAN MARINERS, 8.7.8.7.4.4.7. (8.7.8.7.8.7), Traditional, Merrick's Psalms, 1794.

SICILIAN MARINERS (8.7.8.7.4.4.7.)

1. God, dis-miss us with your bless-ing;
Hope and com-fort from above:
Let us each, your peace pos-sess-ing,
Tri-umph in re-deem-ing love.
O re-fresh us, O re-fresh us,
Trav'-ling through the wil-der-ness.

2. Thanks we give and a-dor-a-tion
For your gos-pel's joy-ful sound;
May the fruits of your sal-va-tion
In our hearts and lives a-bound.
May your pres-ence, may your pres-ence,
With us ev-er-more be found.

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492R Break Forth, O Beauteous Heavenly Light

Break Forth, O Beauteous Heavenly Light, Johann Rist, 1641, Trans. John Troutbeck (verse 1); verse 2 appears in Voices United (United Church of Canada hymnal), Trans. Trozer Rusell, ca. 1851; ERMUNTRE DICH (Break Forth O Beauteous Heavenly Light), 8.7.8.7.8.8.7.7., Johann Schop, 1641, as harmonized by J.S. Bach in the Christmas Oratorio, 1734.

ERMUNTRE DICH (8.7.8.7.8.8.7.7.)

1. Break forth, O beau-teous heav'n-ly light,
And ush-er in the morn-ing;
Ye shep-herds, shrink not with af-fright,
But hear the an-gel's warn-ing.
This child, now weak in in-fan-cy,
Our con-fi-dence and joy shall be,
All self-ish thoughts e'er break-ing,
Our peace e-ter-nal mak-ing.

2. All bless-ing, thanks, and praise to thee,
O light of heav'n, be giv-en:
Thou hast our true friend deigned to be
Our fears in sun-der riv-en.
O grant us through our day of grace
With con-stant praise to seek thy face;
Grant us ere long in glo-ry
With prais-es to a-dore thee.

German Original:

Brich an, o schönes Morgenlicht,
Und laß den Himmel tagen!
Du Hirtenvolk, erschrecke nicht
Weil dir die Engel sagen,
Daß dieses schwache Knäbelein
Soll unser Trost und Freude sein.
Dazu den Satin zwingen
Und letzlich Frieden bringen.

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496R-502S All People That On Earth Do Dwell / Doxology

Old and New Titles: "All People That On Earth Do Dwell," William Kethe (1561), rev. REH (2006), OLD HUNDREDTH (L.M.), attributed to Louis Bourgeois, melody from Genevan Psalter (1551). OLD HUNDREDTH is commonly used for doxologies, and is so used in Hymns of the Spirit Two at nos. 496-502. Equivalents are found in Singing the Living Tradition at nos. 365, 370-381, and in The New Century Hymnal at nos. 7, 27, 776-782. While "All People That On Earth Do Dwell" appears in its old form (in B-flat) in Hymns of the Spirit Two, it appears in its modern form here, in F-sharp (the tune found in no. 497 in Hymns of the Spirit Two). Psalm 100, on which no. 496R is based, is the revised lectionary psalm for Proper 6A/Ordinary 11A/Pentecost 4A, Thanksgiving C and Christ the King/Reign of Christ A. Psalm 117 (see 498R below) is used as a lectionary psalm only by Roman Catholics, for Proper 16C/Ordinary 21C. The lyrics below, through no. 502S, may be used productively with many tunes set in L.M. (8.8.8.8.) meter.

OLD HUNDREDTH (Modern Form) (L.M.)


496R William Kethe (1561), rev. REH (2006)

1. All peo-ple that on earth do dwell,
Sing now a-loud with cheer-ful voice;
The Ho-ly One is God in-deed;
With-out our aid who did us make.

2. Serve Life with mirth, O prais-es tell,
Come ye be-fore all and re-joice.
All are God's folk, who doth us feed,
And for whose sheep Love doth us take.

3. O en-ter Wis-dom's gates with praise,
Ap-proach with joy God's courts un-to;
Praise, laud and bless the Name al-ways,
For it is seem-ly so to do.

4. For why? Our Sove-reign God is good,
Whose mer-cy is for-ev-er sure;
Whose truth at all times firm-ly stood,
And shall from age to age en-dure. A-men.

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496S Théodore de Bèze (1519-1605) et d’autres, arranged by REH (2006)

1. Vous, qui sur la terre ha-bi-tez,
Chan-tez à hau-te voix, chan-tez;
Et, de con-cert a-vec les cieux,
Cé-lé-brez son nom glo-ri-eux.

2. C’est un Dieu rem-pli de bon-té,
D’une é-ter-nel-le vér-i-té,
Tou-jours pro-pice à nos sou-haits,
Et sa grâce du-re à ja-mais. A-men.


497R Nahum Tate and Nicholas Brady, rev. REH (2006)

Be thou, O God, ex-alt-ed high;
And as thy glo-ry fills the sky,
So let it be on earth dis-played,
Till Love is here, as there, obeyed. A-men.


498R Isaac Watts (1718), rev. REH (2006), Paraphrase of Psalm 117

1. From all that dwells be-low the skies
Let the Cre-a-tor's praise a-raise;
Let the Re-deem-er's name be sung
Through eve-ry land, by eve-ry tongue.

2. E-ter-nal are thy mer-cies, Love;
E-ter-nal Truth at-tends a-bove;
Thy praise shall sound from shore to shore;
Till suns shall rise and set no more.

3. Your lof-ty themes, all peo-ples, bring,
In songs of praise di-vine-ly sing;
The great sal-va-tion loud proclaim,
And praise now the larg-er hope's name.

4. In eve-ry land be-gin the song;
To every land the strains be-long;
In cheer-ful sounds all voi-ces raise,
And fill the world with loud-est praise. A-men


499R Thomas Ken, alt., see, e.g., "Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above," James 1:17

Praise God, from whom all bless-ings flow;
Praise God, all crea-tures here below;
Praise God, above, ye heaven-ly throng;
Praise God, Cre-a-tor, in your song. A-men.


499S Based on Thomas Ken, rev. REH (no. 479 de El Himnario)

Can-tad al san-to y~u-no Dios,
sus a-la-ban-zas en-ton-dad;
su~e-ter-na hon-ra pro-cla-mad
con voz de~a-mor y gra-ti-tud. A-mén.


499T Anónimo, rev. REH (no. 476 de El Himnario)

A la di-vi-na U-ni-dad,
to-das y to-dos a-la-bad.
Con a-le-grí-a~y gra-ti-tud
su~a-mor y gra-cia ce-le-brad. A-mén.


499U Clément Marot (1543)

Ren-dez à Dieu lou-ange et gloire,
Car il est be-nign et cle-ment,
Qui plus est sa bon-té no-toire,
Du-re per-pé-tu-el-le-ment. A-men.


500R Anonymous (or Charles H. Lyttle per Singing the Living Tradition, no. 365)

Praise God, the Love we all may share;
Praise God, the Beau-ty eve-ry-where;
Praise God, the Hope of Good to be;
Praise God, the Truth that makes us free. A-men.


501R Gerhard Tersteegen (1729), translated by John Wesley (1739), rev. REH (2007)

1. Lo, God is here! let us a-dore,
And joy-ful-ly make this Love's place;
Let all with-in us feel Truth's power;
Let all with-in us seek Life's grace.

2. Lo, God is here! O, day and night,
U-ni-ted choirs of an-gels sing;
To Hope, en-throned a-bove all height,
Heaven's host their no-blest prais-es bring.

3. O Fount of be-ing! may our praise
Thy courts with grate-ful in-cense fill;
Still may we stand be-fore thy face,
Still hear and do thy sove-reign will. A-men.



501S Nils Frykman (1883), translated from Swedish to English by Andrew L. Skoog (1920), alt. REH (2007)

1. Min fram-tids-dat är ljus och lång,
Den räc-ker bor-tom ti-dens tvång,
Där Gud och Lam-met säll jag ser
Och in-gen nöd skal va-ra mer.


2. A fu-ture of but grace sub-lime,
Be-yond the realms of space and time,
Where the re-deem-er I shall see,
And sor-row ne-ver-more shall be. A-men.


502R Arranged by C. W. Reese (1935)

From all that dwell be-low the skies;
Let faith and hope with love a-rise;
Let beau-ty, truth and good be sung
Through eve-ry land, by eve-ry tongue. Amen.


502S Based on Isaac Watts

De to-dos ba-jos el gran sol
sur-ja~es-per-an-za, fe, a-mor
ver-dad, y~be-lle-za can-tan-do,
de ca-da tierr-a, ca-da voz. A-mén.


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517R Dominus Vobiscum

Original Title: "The Lord Be With You," Traditional, rev. REH (2006). The downloadable music files contain only the sung responses. "The Eternal," despite its latter-day sound, in fact can be traced to John Calvin, as a translation of the Hebrew Yahweh, "I am that I am," or "I am that I will be," the veritable God of Being. In Hymns of the Spirit Two, the "spoken" part is designated as belonging to the "Minister," and the sung part as belonging to the "Choir." Versicles are used in many churches, and have been so used since the earliest times (extended versions may be found in the Roman mass, the Episcopal and King's Chapel Book of Common Prayer as well as the old Universalist Prayerbook, the Gloria Patri). Typically it is the whole congregation that responds, sometimes in spoken form, sometimes in sung form. Many otherwise non-liturgical churches in various traditions employ such a liturgical touch before pastoral or congregational prayers and petitions, placing the "Amen" after such prayers (often in addition to a time of silent reflection). "Wash me throughly from mine iniquity, and cleanse me from my sin," Psalm 51:2.

Spoken:
The Lord be with you
or: The Eternal be with you
or: God be with you.

Sung Response:
or: And with thy spir-it
or: And with your spir-it.

Spoken:
Let us pray. O Lord, show thy mercy upon us.
or: Let us pray. O Eternal, show your mercy upon us.
or: Let us pray. O God, show your mercy upon us.

Sung Response:
And grant us thy salvation.
or: And grant us your sal-va-tion.
or: And grant us your for-give-ness.

Spoken:
O God, make clean our hearts within us.
or May Love make clean our hearts within us.

Sung Response:
And take not thy ho-ly spir-it from us.
or And take not your ho-ly spir-it from us.
or And may the spir-it of life dwell with us.

If desired, the following sentences may be omitted.

Spoken:
O Thou, in whom alone our hearts find rest,
or O You, in whom alone our hearts find rest,
or O You, in whom our hearts find rest,

Sung Response:
Grant us thy peace. A-men.
or: Grant us your peace. A-men.
or: Grant us your peace. Be blessed.

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January 05, 2006

531S Psalm 67: Bless Us, O God

Original Title: "God Be Merciful Unto Me," Anonymous, first setting, Anonymous, second setting, William Croft; New Title: "Psalm 67: Bless Us, O God," Christine Robinson (2006), arranged by REH (2006), first setting, Anonymous. Christine Robinson is a minister at First Unitarian Church in Albuquerque, New Mexico; her adaptation of the psalms has been part of her daily spiritual exercises since 2003. During a sabbatical from parish ministry, she began to write these psalms on a blog entitled Psalms for a New World, an adaptation using "inclusive language and through modern lenses of ecological awareness, Taoist sensibilites, and post-modern theology." Though the style of these adaptations would generally not be suited for metrical psalms or "four-square" hymn paraphrases, Hymns of the Spirit Two does contain a few Anglican-style plainchants that do not require rigorous rhyming or metrical schemes. This is one of those selections, and the Reverend Robinson's work has been adopted for inclusion here. She has graciously granted permission for same. The normal copyright restrictions on local and congregational use apply as noted below. Psalm 67 is the revised common lectionary psalm for Proper 15A/Ordinary 20A/Pentecost 13A and Easter 6C.

PSALM 67 (Chant)

1. Bless us, O God; whisper~in~our hearts and light our times.
2. Help~us~to~understand~your~love and your law; and~bring~them~to bear on the world’s ills.
3. Let~all~the~people~of~the earth praise you with~all their di-verse voi-ces.
4. Let~them~call~out~the~ten thou-sand names; let~all~nations~praise~you~with the best of their ways.
5. Let~the~peoples~of~the~earth bless the earth and~heal~earth~together;~let~us~all~enjoy each oth-er’s wis-dom.
6. Bless~us,~O~God,~with~your~presence in our hearts; and~in~the~soul~of our na-tion. A-men.

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546R Faith of the Martyrs, Living Still

Original Title: "Faith of Our Fathers, Living Still," adapted from Frederick William Faber (1849), ST. CATHERINE, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Henri Frederick Hemi (1865); New Title: "Faith of the Martyrs," rev. REH (2006), same hyme tune. Though the son of an Anglican cleric, Faber was a Roman Catholic priest. The hymn speaks of the persecution of Catholics in Britain; the original spoke of "Mary's prayers" that would set Britain free. Its position in Hymns of the Spirit Two (1937) is of note; as no. 546, it is the first hymn in the section marked "SUPPLEMENT." Many of these hymns were reckoned to be tunes of lesser quality, popular with the more rural Universalists. Oddly, however, "Faith of Our Fathers" does not appear in the prior hymnal published by the Universalists, Hymns of the Church (Boston: 1917) (though Reginald Heber's "Forth From the Dark and Stormy Sky" appears therein to ST. CATHERINE, a tune which does not appear anywhere other than at no. 546 in Hymns of the Spirit Two). It may be that its Catholic pedigree (Universalists were generally less anti-Catholic than Unitarians and other Protestants of the day) and the theme of persecution made the hymn appropriate for the "Universalist" section. In New England, the Unitarians were originally part of the "Standing Order" of (state-supported) Puritan/Congregational churches until in some cases the middle part of the 19th century; such standing did not apply to the (relatively speaking, persecuted) Universalists. The lyrics echo Hebrews 11:1-2 (NRSV), "Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen. Indeed, by faith our ancestors received approval." They also obliquely refer to the story in Mark regarding John the Baptist, "she rushed back to the king and requested, 'I want you to give me at once the head of John the Baptist on a platter,' . . . Immediately the king sent a soldier of the guard with orders to bring John's head. He went and beheaded him in the prison, brought his head on a platter," Mark 6:25-28. One too is reminded of Job in the Hebrew Bible, "But [God] knows the way that I take; when he has tested me, I shall come out like gold," Job 23:10. "Then the Lord answered Job out of the whirlwind: . . . Gird up your loins . . . I will question you, and you shall declare to me," Job 38:1-3. "Then Job answered the Lord: 'I know that you can do all things, and that no purpose of yours can be thwarted,'" Job 42:1-2. The hymn's lyrical change to "Faith of Our Mothers" is more than fanciful political correction; while the Congregational Church claims the first woman ordained to Christain ministry in the United States, the Universalists claim the first woman approved to the ministry at the denominational level, in the person of Olympia Brown. In the Midwest, female preaching "circuit riders" (including the celebrated Iowa Sisterhood) famously spread the liberating gospel of the faith. The hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, but does appear as "Faith of the Martyrs, Living Still," as no. 381, in The New Century Hymnal.

ST. CATHERINE (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. Faith of the mar-tyrs, liv-ing still,
in spite of dun-geon, fire and sword;
O how our hearts beat high with joy
when-e'er we hear that glo-rious word!
Faith of the mar-tyrs, ho-ly faith!
We will be true through life and death.

2. Faith of our fa-thers, we will strive
to dwell with all souls peace-ful-ly;
and through the truth that comes from God,
we all shall then be tru-ly free.
Faith of our fa-thers, ho-ly faith!
We will be true through life and death.

3. Our for-bears chained in pri-son dim
were still in heart and con-science free;
and blessed would be our own lives' fate
if we, like them, should live for thee.
Faith of our for-bears, ho-ly faith!
We will be true through life and death.

4. Faith of our mo-thers, we will love
both friend and foe in all our strife;
and preach thee, too, as love knows how
by kind-ly words and vir-tuous life.
Faith of our mo-thers, ho-ly faith!
We will be true through life and death.

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January 07, 2006

556R There's a Wideness in God's Mercy

Original Title: "Souls of Men! Why Will Ye Scatter," Frederick William Faber (1854), WESTON, 8.7.8.7.8.7.8.7., John E. Roe; New Title: "There's a Wideness in God's Mercy," rev. REH (2007), ST. MABYN, 8.7.8.7. D, Arthur Henry Brown (1889). "Or those eighteen who were killed when the tower of Siloam fell on them—do you think that they were worse offenders than all the others living in Jerusalem? No, I tell you," Luke 13:4-5a (NRSV). "His mercy is for those who fear him from generation to generation,” Luke 1:50. Zechariah 13:17 (ESV), "Strike the shepherd, and the sheep will be scattered." Isaiah 60:20 (KJV), "Thy sun shall no more go down; neither shall thy moon withdraw itself: for the LORD shall be thine everlasting light, and the days of thy mourning shall be ended." Luke 15:4-5, "What man of you, having an hundred sheep, if he lose one of them, doth not leave the ninety and nine in the wilderness, and go after that which is lost, until he find it? And when he hath found it, he layeth it on his shoulders, rejoicing." Psalm 119:96 (ESV), "I have seen a limit to all perfection, but your commandment is exceedingly broad." 1John 5:3 (NRSV), "For the love of God is this, that we obey his commandments. And his commandments are not burdensome;" see also Romans 7:12. The hymn appears as no. 213 with three stanzas (from stanza one below, and the first half of stanza three) to the tune CHARLESTON, 8.7.8.7., in Singing the Living Tradition. It also appears as no. 23 in The New Century Hymnal to the tune IN BABILONE, 8.7.8.7.D, with two stanzas, with HOLY MANNA as an alternate.

ST. MABYN (8.7.8.7. D)

1. There's a wide-ness in God's mer-cy,
like the wide-ness of the sea;
there's a kind-ness in true jus-tice,
which is more than lib-er-ty.
For the love di-vine is broad-er
than the mea-sure of our mind;
and the heart of the E-ter-nal
is most won-der-ful-ly kind.

2. Souls on earth, why do you scat-ter
like a crowd of count-ing sheep?
Lone-some hearts, why do you wan-der
from a love so true and deep?
Do you know a kind-er shep-herd
half as gen-tle, half as sweet,
as the Sove-reign who would have us
turn to heav-en's mer-cy seat?

3. O we make love's law too nar-row
by false li-mits of our own;
and we mag-ni-fy God's strict-ness
with a zeal not heav-en's own.
If our lives were but more sim-ple,
we should live them in God's love;
then our lives would all be sun-shine
with a sweet-ness from a-bove.

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January 08, 2006

600R Pues Si Vivimos

Title: "Pues Si Vivimos," Mexican folk hymn, anonymous translation, "In All Our Living," PUES SI VIVIMOS, Irregular, traditional hymn; The hymn appears in The New Century Hymnal along with other, copyrighted stanzas as no. 499; likewise is the case with Mil voces para celebrar (in which still other stanzas appear) where it is included as no. 337. It does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in Hymns of the Spirit Two. The hymn was transcribed by Gerturde Suppe when she heard it sung by two church women from Mexico. The lyrics are based on Romans 14:8, but have other resonances as well.

PUES SI VIVIMOS (Irr.)

1. Pues si vi-vi-mos, pa-ra Dios vi-vi~mos
y si mo-ri-mos, pa-ra Dios mo-ri~mos.
Se-a que vi-va-mos, o que mu-ra~mos,
so-mos del buen Dios, so-mos del buen Dios.

2. In all our liv-ing, we be-long to God;
and in our dy-ing, we are still with God;
So,_ wheth-er liv-ing, or wheth-er dy~ing,
we be-long to God; we be-long to God.

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January 10, 2006

601R O Love, My Inmost Heart

Title: "O Love, My Inmost Heart," The Psalter (1912), rev. REH (2005), GUTERHIRT, C.M., Michael Lonnecke (2005). Though not included in Hymns of the Spirit Two, this minor recasting of Psalm 139 from The Psalter is included here, to a hymn tune written by Michael Lonnecke for the psalm. Lonneke was the found­ing pre­si­dent of the Lou­doun, Vir­gin­ia, Sym­pho­ny, and serves as or­gan­ist for the Ang­li­can Church of the Good Shep­herd and for Trin­i­ty United Meth­od­ist Church, both in Par­is, Vir­gin­ia, near Washington. He has released the tune into the public domain.

GUTERHIRT (C.M.)

1. O Love, my in-most heart and thought
thy search-ing eye doth see;
Wher-e'er I rest, wher-e'er I go,
my ways are known to thee.

2. Each spok-en word, each si-lent thought,
thou, God, dost un-der-stand;
Be-fore me and be-hind art thou,
sus-tain-ing by thy hand.


3. If I the wings of morn-ing take
to some re-mot-est land,
still I shall be up-held by thee
and guid-ed by thy hand.

4. From thee, O God, I can-not hide
though night-time cov-er me;
The even-ing and the light of day
are both a-like to thee.

5. Search me, O Truth, and know my heart,
try me, my thoughts to know;
O lead me, if aim-less I stray,
in paths of life to go.

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January 14, 2006

602R O Light of Every Nation

Title: "O Light of Every Nation," Johann Franck (1674), originally "Herr Jesu, Licht der Heiden," translated from German to English by Catherine Winkworth (1863), rev. REH (2006), VALET WILL ICH DIR GEBEN, 7.6.7.6 D, Melchior Teschner (1613). The Song of Simeon, or the Nunc Dimittis, is often associated with Candlemas (and typically used as a closing hymn), and is found at Luke 2:29-32. The following hymn, Catherine Winkworth's translation from the German, entitled "O Light of Every Nation," which echoes this passage.

VALET WILL ICH DIR GEBEN (7.6.7.6. D)

1. O light of eve-ry na-tion, re-deem-er from a-bove,
drawn by the spir-it’s lead-ing, we come with joy and love
into your ho-ly tem-ple and wait with earn-est mind
as Sim-eon once had wait-ed on the Sove-reign to find.

2. O, God, your seek-ers meet you in eve-ry ho-ly place
where your true words have pro-mis-ed that we should find your grace.
To-day you still do grant us who ga-ther 'round you here
in arms of faith to bear you as did that agèd seer.


3. O be our joy and bright-ness, our cheer in loss and pain,
our sun in deep-est ter-ror, the glo-ry of your reign,
a star for sink-ing spir-its, a bea-con in dis-tress,
phy-si-cian, friend in sick-ness, in death our hap-pi-ness.

4. Let us, O God, be faith-ful like Sim-eon to the end,
So that this prayer ex-ul-tant may from our hearts as-cend:
"O God, now let your ser-vant de-part in peace, I pray,
since I have seen th'A-noint-ed here on this ve-ry day."


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January 15, 2006

603R Rock of Ages / Roca de la eternidad

REDHEAD (PETRA)(7.7.7.7.7.7.)

1. Rock of A-ges, cleft for me,
let me hide, a shel-ter be;
O the wa-ters midst the flood,
from the wound-ed sky did flow;
May we find a last-ing cure;
Save from wrath and make all pure.

2. Noth-ing in my hand I bring,
simp-ly to your love I cling;
Nak-ed, come to you for dress;
Help-less, look to you for grace;
Foul, I to your foun-tain fly;
Wash me, Pure Love, now my cry.

3. While I draw this fleet-ing breath,
when my eye-strings close in death,
when I soar to worlds un-known,
see you on the mer-cy throne!
Rock of A-ges, cleft for me,
Let me hide; a shel-ter be


a. Ro-ca de la~e-ter-ni-dad,
fuis-te~a-bier-ta tú por mí.
Sé mi~es-con-de-de-ro fiel,
só-lo~en-cuen-tro paz en ti;
ri-co, lim-pio ma-nan-tial,
en el cual la-va-do fui.

b. Aun-que se-a siem-pre fiel,
aun-que lu-che sin ce-sar,
só-lo~en ti te-nien-do fe,
sal-va-ción he de go-zar;
Sé mi~es-con-de-de-ro fiel,
ro-ca de la~e-ter-ni-dad.

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January 16, 2006

604R How Good and Pleasant

Paraphrase of Psalm 133.

RAMOTH (8.8.6.8.8.6.)

1. How good and pleas-ant is the sight
when all souls make it a de-light
to dwell in un-i-ty;
O Love is an a-noin-ting oil
that con-se-crates our dai-ly toil
in sweet-est a-mi-ty.

2. O Love in peace and joy di-stills,
as down the slopes of Her-mon’s hills
re-fresh-ing dew des-cends;
O God pro-vides a bless-ing there,
so all shall walk in Truth and share
in life that nev-er ends.

3. How good and pleas-ant is the sight
when all souls make it a de-light
to dwell in un-i-ty;
O now des-cends the spir-it's care,
so all shall in Love's mer-cy share
true life and am-i-ty.

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January 17, 2006

605R Love Alone is the Worthy Law

Title: "Love Alone is the Worthy Law," Christina Rossetti (1893), rev. REH (2006), LANGRAN, 10.10.10.10., James Langran (1863). English poet Christina Rossetti, born in 1830 of Italian parents living in exile in England, Anglican and much influenced by the Oxford Movement to return to more "Anglo-Catholic" modes of worship, wrote Victorian verse that described intense religious experiences. The words below appear in her poem "Quinquagesima," Latin for 50 (days before Easter), or the Sunday before Ash Wednesday (technically Transfiguration Sunday); depending on when Easter fell, this might well be within the approximate time of St. Valentine's Day. St. Valentine, by legend, married Roman soldiers when they were prohibited from doing so. See also Ephesians 2:15, "[Christ] has abolished the law with its commandments and ordinances, that he might create in himself one new humanity in place of the two, thus making peace."

LANGRAN (10.10.10.10.)

1. Love a-lone is the wor-thy law of love:
All oth-er laws have pre-sup-posed a taint:
Love is the law from kind-led saint to saint,
from lamb to lamb, from dove to answe-ring dove.


2. Love is the mo-tive of all things that move,
har-mon-ious by free will with-out con-straint:
Love learns and teach-es: love shall us ac-quaint
with all we lack, and all we lack is love.

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May 11, 2006

606R O Liberating Love

Title: "O Liberating Love," Sternhold & Hopkins (1812), Psalm 36:5-10, adapted by REH (2007); CAROL, C.M.D., Richard Storrs Willis (1850). These verses constitute the Revised Common Lectionary reading from the Psalms for Epiphany 2C and Holy Week Monday. "Sophia" is Greek for "Wisdom," who appears as a feminine voice of the Divine in Proverbs and other portions of the Bible's Wisdom books. Admittedly an obscure reference for some congregations, it can be replaced by repeating "O Wisdom," though "the Spirit" likewise fits the tune. CAROL is the hymn tune for the well-known Christmas carol "It Came Upon a Midnight Clear," written by Unitarian Edmund Sears in 1849.

CAROL (C.M.D.)

1. O Li-ber-at-ing Love as-cends
a-bove the heavens most high,
as pierc-ing Truth it-self ex-tends
up through the cloud-y sky.
Rise, moun-tains migh-ty, high and brave:
Your peaks of jus-tice call!
Earth's an-i-mals, the o-ceans save,
and hu-mans, all in all.

2. O Wis-dom drifts a-bove all things;
So-phi-a* shall ex-cel
the na-tions’ dreams; be-neath God's wings,
all peo-ple rich-ly dwell.
In high-est tem-ple, all are fed,
a-bun-dance at their will,
and tru-est hopes shall there be spread,
and all shall take their fill.

3. O praise the Fount of bless-ings pure
whose flow shall end-less be;
be-neath Love's Fount the soul is sure
the Light of lights to see.
From ev-ery soul who seeks to know,
let not God's grace de-part:
O may the Spir-it's teach-ings show
to all of o-pen heart.


* or 'the Spirit'

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June 14, 2006

607R O Blessed Seekers

Title: "O Blessed Seekers," United Presbyterian Psalter (1887), Psalm 1, adapted by REH (2007), ST. CATHERINE, 8.8.8.8.8.8., Henri F. Hemy (1865). Psalm 1 is a Revised Common Lectionary text for Epiphany 6C, Proper 18C/Ordinary 23C, Proper 20B/Ordinary 25B, Easter 7B and Proper 25A/Ordinary 30A. SUSSEX CAROL and FOLKINGHAM are alternative hymn tunes.

ST. CATHERINE (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. O bless-ed seek-ers do not stray
on smooth stones laid to tempt our feet,
nor fol-low down a thought-less way,
nor sit up-on the cyn-ic's seat:
But on the Tor-ah take de-light,
and med-i-tate both day and night.

2. They shall be like tall trees in spring
where clear, clean wat-ers gent-ly mist,
which dark-blue ber-ries count-less bring,
and ev-er green the leaves per-sist:
Thus shall pros-per-i-ty re-vive
the good, green Earth, and all hearts thrive.

3. Not so the self-ish lot, for they
as dust, in heat and wind, are spent;
they plun-der through each judg-ment day,
and do not dance through life con-tent:
God's Earth sus-tains a good, green trail;
des-truc-tive ways shall not pre-vail.

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July 12, 2006

608R Soon God's Redeeming Grace Will Come

Title: "Soon God's Redeeming Grace Will Come," Anonymous, rev. REH (2006), WINCHESTER NEW, L.M., Musikalisches Handbuch (1690). Based on Psalm 85:9-13. The original hymn, which does not appear in Hymns of the Spirit Two (1937), is entitled "Lord, Thou Hast Greatly Blessed Our Land," Anonymous, REPENTANCE, L.M., Theodore E. Perkins (1831-1912). Psalm 85, or parts thereof, constitutes a lectionary reading for Proper 14A/Ordinary 19A, Advent 2B, Proper 10B/Ordinary 15B, and Proper 12C/Ordinary 17C.

WINCHESTER NEW (L.M.)

1. Soon God's re-deem-ing grace will come;
all souls new-mind-ed will be-come;
and glo-ry through our land shall dwell,
when we do heed Love's teach-ings well.

2. Now truth a-grees with mer-cy's bliss;
the law and peace come forth to kiss;
be-hold the truth from earth a-rise,
with jus-tice shin-ing from the skies.

3. The Ho-ly will send bles-sings down;
green har-vests all the land shall crown;
wide whole-some-ness be-fore us lies;
our sure foot-steps are Life's sur-mise. A-men.

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609R Your Burning Love

Title: "Your Burning Love," adaped by REH (2007) from The Psalter (1912), Psalm 30; MEIRIONYDD, 7.6.7.6. D, William Freeman Lloyd (1840). Psalm 30 is an appointed reading for Epiphany 6B, Proper 8B/Ordinary 13B, Easter 3C, Proper 5C/Ordinary 10 and Proper 9C/Ordinary 14C.

MEIRIONYDD (7.6.7.6. D)

1. Your burn-ing love de-liv-ered;
in sweet love songs I cried;
my harsh-est cri-tics suf-fered
in si-lence midst my slide.
O Hard-ened Truth, I sought you;
your strength my heart did save;
O you did teach me wis-dom,
whose path is long and brave.

2. Love's ho-ly name re-mem-ber,
all souls, give thanks and praise!
Life's sor-rows last a mo-ment;
God's fa-vor lasts al-ways;
for sor-row, like a pil-grim,
may come to stay the night,
but joy the soul will glad-den
when dawns the mor-ning light.

3. In gol-den days I boast-ed,
"A moun-tain I re-main!"
O God, with pleas-ing fa-vor,
the high-land crests sus-tain.
Then my life near-ly crumb-led,
no more I heard you speak,
and cried a-loud, "O dear God;"
your mys-tery did I seek.

4. Who'd pro-fit if we per-ished,
if our lives were not spared?
Would dust then sing out prais-es;
how would Truth be de-clared?
O God, send down com-pass-ion,
and our de-si-res hear;
the heart needs you as lov-er:
O Spir-it soon ap-pear!

5. Lo, heart-ache turns to dan-ces,
to you great thanks all raise,
who took a-way this sad-ness,
and lift-ed all in praise!
So now, no lon-ger si-lent,
with burn-ing love all sing:
"O Sweet-est God, for-ev-er,"
and thanks on high do bring!

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July 14, 2006

610R My Soul Shall Bless the Soul of All

Title: "My Soul Shall Bless the Soul of All," William Cowper, Olney Hymns (London: 1779), TRURO, L.M., Thomas Williams, Psalmodia Evangelica, (1789); rev. REH (2006). Paraphrase of Pslam 34:1-8, which is a lectionary reading for All Saints A, Proper 14B/Ordinary 19B, and Proper 25B/Ordinary 30B.

TRURO (L.M.)

1. My soul shall bless the Soul of all,
my praise shall climb to God's a-bode;
O Ho-ly One, whose name I call,
the great Su-preme, the lov-ing God.

2. With-out be-gin-ning, or de-cline,
Ob-ject of faith, and not of sense;
e-ter-nal a-ges saw you shine,
and shine e-ter-nal a-ges hence.

3. Of all the crowns O God you bear,
for-give-ness is your dear-est claim;
that gra-cious sound well-pleased you hear,
who owns "God-with-us" as a name.


4. A cheer-ful con-fi-dence I feel,
my well-placed hopes with joy I see;
my bo-som glows with heaven-ly zeal
to wor-ship one who loves free-ly.

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611R Mary, First One to the Tomb

Title: 'Mary, First One to the Tomb," John Newton (1779), rev. REH (2006), GOTT SEI DANK, 7.7.7.7., Johann A. Freylinghausen (1704). Newton's orignal title was "Mary, to her Savior's Tomb." Matthew 28:1; Mark 16:1-9, Luke 24:10, John 20:1 (KJV), "The first day of the week cometh Mary Magdalene early, when it was yet dark, unto the sepulchre, and seeth the stone taken away from the sepulchre," see also John 20:1-18. The "feast day" of Mary Magdalene, or Mary of Magdala, is July 22, in Roman Catholic and other more "liturgical" churches. All the same, many in the free church sometimes choose to celebrate this woman of vision and courage as a pioneer of faith.

GOTT SEI DANK (7.7.7.7.)

1. Ma-ry, first one to the tomb,
swift-ly at the ear-ly dawn;
spice she brought, and sweet per-fume;
The Be-lov-ed One was gone.


2. The Mag-da-lene weep-ing stood,
struck with sor-row and sur-prise;
shed-ding tears, a plen-teous flood,
for the heart sup-plied her eyes.

3. Jes-us, as if al-ways near,
though too oft-en un-per-ceived,
came, a true lead-er to cheer,
asked to her soul, why she grieved?


4. What a change liv-ing words make,
turn-ing our nights in-to day!
All who e'er weep for Life’s sake,
Love will wipe your tears a-way.

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July 19, 2006

612R God of All Worlds

Original Title: "Lord of All Worlds," John Quincy Adams (1767-1848); New Title: "God of All Worlds," rev. REH (2006), DEUS TUORUM MILITUM, L.M.D., Grenoble Antiphoner (1753). Paraphrase of Psalm 14. Adams was the sixth President of the United States. A Unitarian, he wrote metrical versions of the psalms and several hymns. He is buried at the historic First Parish Church (Unitarian) in Quincy, Massachusetts.

DEUS TUORUM MILITUM (L.M.D.)

1. God of all worlds, let thanks and praise
to you for-ev-er fill my soul;
with bles-sings you have crowned my days,
my heart, my head, my hand con-trol.
O, let no vain pre-sump-tions rise,
no im-pious mur-mur in my heart,
to crave what-e'er your will de-nies,
or shrink from what your hands im-part.

2. Your child am I, and not an hour,
re-vol-ving in the orbs a-bove,
but brings some to-ken of your power,
but brings some to-ken of your love;
and shall this bo-som dare re-pine,
in night time dare de-ny the dawn,
or spurn the trea-sures of the mine,
be-cause one dia-mond is with-drawn?

3. Some souls do doubt, and not a-lone
your be-ing, God, and bound-less might,
but doubt the fir-ma-ment, your throne,
and doubt the sun’s me-ri-dian light;
and doubt the fa-shion of one's frame,
the voice one hears, the breath one draws;
O way-laid mor-tals, who pro-claim
ef-fects un-num-bered with-out cause!

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July 24, 2006

613R Behold, O My Whole Heart

Title: "Behold, O My Whole Heart," Brady & Tate (1696), Psalm 138, adapted by REH (2007), MORNING SONG (CONSOLATION), C.M.D., Repository of Sacred Music (1813). Psalm 138 is a lectionary reading for Epiphany 5C, Proper 12C/Ordinary 17C, Proper 16A/Ordinary 21A, Proper 5B/Ordinary 10B. Most English versions translate the Hebrew in the first verse as "gods," though it equally means "goddess;" this is reflected in the lyrics below. Alternative hymn tunes include OLD 29TH, C.M.D., ALL SAINTS NEW, C.M.D., ST. THEODULPH, C.M.D.

MORNING SONG (CONSOLATION)(C.M.D.)

1. Be-hold, O my whole heart I'll bring,
and praise to God pro-claim;
be-fore the Queen of life I'll sing,
and bless the liv-ing name.
I'll cel-e-brate the sa-cred lights,
where-ev-er Love is found,
and bow my heart toward ho-ly sites,
where Wis-dom's words a-bound.

2. O God, you lend a lis-tening ear
when I cry out my heart;
and when my strength lies stuck in fear,
Love makes my dread de-part.
When lead-ers Wis-dom do pur-sue:
their hearts shall shout out praise.
Souls sing-ing of a king-dom true
shall show us of Love's ways.

3. The Most High treats the proud with scorn;
the poor, God tends their way:
And when in life as dan-gers warn,
grant safe-ty, come what may!
O Love whose pur-pos-es do last,
shall be my dwell-ing place;
And, mind-ful of each pro-mise past:
O Love, fill Earth and space.

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July 27, 2006

614R Part in Peace

Original Title: "Part in Peace: Is Day Before Us?," Sarah F. Adams, in Hymns and Anthems, by William Johnson Fox (London: 1841), BEATRICE, 8.7.8.7., Wiliam C. Coe (1895); New Title: "Part in Peace (This Day Before Us)", rev. REH (2006), STUTTGART, 8.7.8.7., Christian Friedrich Witt in Psalmodia Sacra (Gotha 1715). "Depart in peace," James 2:16 (KJV). Adams was a English Unitarian, best known for the hymn "Nearer My God to Thee."

STUTTGART (8.7.8.7.)

1. Part in peace, this day be-fore us;
praise the Name, for life and light;
when the sha-dows leng-then o'er us,
bless the Love that guards the night.

2. Part in peace, with deep thanks-giv-ing,
ren-der, when we're home-ward bound,
gra-cious ser-vice in our liv-ing,
tran-quil beau-ty all a-round.

3. Part in peace, such are the prais-es
God our Ma-ker lov-eth best;
such the wor-ship that up-rais-es
hu-man hearts to heav-en-ly rest.

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July 28, 2006

615R All Praise the Life (Which Gives Us Voice)

Original Title: "I'll Praise My Maker," Isaac Watts (1719), OLD 113TH, 8.8.8.8.8.8., attributed to Matthäus Greiter, Strassburger Kirchenamt (1525); New Title: "All Praise the Life (Which Gives Us Voice)," rev. REH (2006), same hymn tune. A paraphrase of Psalm 146, all or parts of which are a lectionary reading for Advent 3A, Proper 18B/Ordinary 23B, Proper 26B/Ordinary 31B, Proper 27B/Ordinary 32B, Proper 5C/Ordinary 10C and Proper 21C/Ordinary 26C. Though the hymn does not appear in Singing the Living Tradition, nor in The New Century Hymnal, but some may find the John Wesley version of Isaac Watts' hymn, that appears as no. 253 in a further revised version (1988) in The Presbyterian Hymnal (1990), "I'll Praise My Maker," OLD 113TH, of use in their local or congregational settings.

OLD 113TH (8.8.8.8.8.8.)

1. All praise the Life which gives us voice!
Sing out songs, cease-less-ly re-joice!
Praise shall em-ploy our no-blest drives;
rul-ers de-part; their pomp, their power;
vain thoughts, all van-ish in the hour:
But Time's e-ter-ni-ty sur-vives.

2. Hap-py are all whose dreams re-ly
on An-cients' God who made their sky,
and earth, and seas, with all their train:
whose truth for-ev-er stands se-cure,
who frees cap-tives and feeds the poor;
we serve them too, else trust in vain.

3. Di-vine vis-ion aids ev-ery eye;
Our So-phi-a sooths the mind's cry;
O God, O Wis-dom, ev-er reigns:
Let eve-ry tongue, let eve-ry age,
in Love's ex-al-ted work en-gage;
Sing praise in ev-er-last-ing strains!

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July 29, 2006

616R O Heart of Fire

Title: "O Heart of Fire," John Henry Newman (1833), from his Hymns (New York: 1896), arr. REH (2006), LUX VERA, 10.6.10.6., John Bacchus Dykes (1870). Newman wrote of the love between "David and Jonathan" in a work of that name, with the epigraph to the poem "Thy love to me is wonderful, passing the love of women," 2 Samuel 1:26 (KJV). Newman (1801-1890) was a British clergyman and leader in the Anglo-Catholic "Oxford Movement," who eventually converted to Roman Catholicism, and became a cardinal; the "cause" of his sainthood in the Roman sense is pending (though all are free to assume that he is already a saint-- an example of faith-- in the best and broadest sense of the word). He is buried in same grave as his companion, Ambrose St. John. See also "Now there was leaning on Jesus' bosom one of his disciples, whom Jesus loved," John 13:23 (KJV); "It is Christ that died, yea rather, that is risen again, who is even at the right hand of God, who also maketh intercession for us," Romans 8:34. "For righteousness is immortal," Wisdom of Solomon 1:15.

LUX VERA (10.6.10.6.)

1. O heart of fire, mis-judged by wil-ful gain,
the flower of Jes-se's race!
What woe you had when you and Jon-a-than
last greet-ed face to face

2. One doomed to die, and on us to im-press
a heart-felt hol-i-ness;
yet all was well for you, mid cares of rule,
and crime's en-circ-ling pool.

3. A spell was o'er you, zeal-ous one, to chide,
your word-ly, roy-al pride;
with bat-tle-scene and pa-geant, soon to end
the pale calm of a friend.

4. Had the friend lived, be-fore your throne to stand,
your spir-it keen and free,
would love have then sur-vived, a slend-er band,
so dear in mem-o-ry?

5. Paul, of the com-rade reft, the bless-ing gives:
a life re-mem-bered lives;
O heart of fire, come greet us face to face,
O flower of love's long race!

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August 03, 2006

617R If God Had Not Been On Our Side

Title: "If God Had Not Been On On Our Side," Martin Luther (1524), translation of "Wär’ Gott nicht mit uns diese Zeit," composite translators, rev. REH (2006), WÄR’ GOTT NICHT MIT UNS, 8.7.8.7.8.8.7., Gesangbuch (Wittenberg: 1537). Paraphrase of Psalm 124, a lectionary reading for Proper 16A/Ordinary 21A and Proper 21B/Ordinary 26B.

WÄR’ GOTT NICHT MIT UNS (8.7.8.7.8.8.7.)

1. If God had not been on our side
and had not come to aid us,
would our foes with their power and pride
then sure-ly have dis-mayed us?
Would we, God's flock, then have to fear
the threats of those both far and near
who act in might a-gainst us?

2. Such wrath, dear God, do not per-mit,
it sure-ly would con-sume us
and as a deep and yawn-ing pit
with life and limb en-tomb us.
Like those o’er whom deep wa-ter rolls,
that wrath then would en-gulf our souls
and, like a flood, o’er-whelm us.

3. Bless A-do-nai, who foils our threats
that they might not de-vour us.
Our souls, like birds, es-cape their nets,
they could not ov-er-power us.
The snare is brok-en; we are free!
Our help is ev-er, God, in thee,
who made the earth and heav-en.

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618R Bendeciré a Jehová en todo tiempo

"Bendeciré a Jehová en todo tiempo," Salmo 34:1-4, del Himnario de la Iglesia Evangélica Presbiteriana y Reformada "Betel," en Lima, Perú (ieprp_betel@yahoo.com), 11.11.11.11. The first part of Psalm 34 is a lectionary reading for All Saints A, Proper 14B/Ordinary 19B and Proper 25B/Ordinary 30B.

1. Ben-de-ci-ré~a Je-ho-vá~en to-do tiem-po:
Su~a-la-ban-za de en bo-ca es-ta-rá
en Je-ho-vá se glor-iar-á mi al-ma;
Lo oi-rán los man-sos y se~a-le-gra-rán.

2. En-gran-de-ced a Je-ho-vá con-mi-go,
Y ex-al-te-mos a-un a su nom-bre.
Bus-qué a Je-ho-vá y Dios me~o-yó,
Y de to-dos mis tem-or-es me li-bró.

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December 31, 2006

620R God of Queer, Transgressive Spaces

Title: "God of Queer, Transgressive Spaces," Edward Moran (2005), alt., CONVERSE, 8.7.8.7. D, C. C. Converse (1868). Moran is a Presbyterian who lives in the Fort Greene section of Brooklyn, New York; many of the lyrics of the hymns he has written can be found in the "Hymn Texts" section of the website run by The Hymn Society in the United States and Canada. Moran describes the work below as addressing "often-divisive issues of sexual diversity in the light of traditional images of Incarnation and Trinity." The lyrics have been edited lightly here. The second stanza originally read as a statement rather than a question, i.e., "Born of virgin, Word made flesh, dead and buried, still He rises!" The third stanza likewise read "Easter garments, at His order, Swaddle Her beloved One," without a question mark. Finally, the last stanza here reads "unbound God" in lieu of "Threesome God" as in Moran's original. The lyrics remain under copyright all the same, (c) Edward Moran 2006. They appear here by his kind permission. Users may wish to request permission to reproduce the hymn for local or congregational worship, or other purposes, by writing him at EMoran8688@aol.com. "Keep these words that I am commanding you today in your heart ... Bind them as a sign on your hand, fix them as an emblem on your forehead," Deuteronomy 6:6, 8 (NRSV), see also Deuteronomy 11:18. "It is God's gift that all should eat and drink and take pleasure in all their toil." Ecclesiastes 3:13. "My beloved speaks and says to me: Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away," Song of Songs 2:10. "Jonathan made a covenant with David, because he loved him as his own soul. Jonathan stripped himself of the robe that he was wearing, and gave it to David, and his armor, and even his sword and his bow and his belt," 1 Samuel 18:3-4; see also 2 Samuel 1:26. "Owe no one anything, except to love one another; for the one who loves another has fulfilled the law," Romans 13:8, see also Romans 14:10, 12:4, 8:21. "This is my body that is for you. Do this in remembrance of me," 1 Corinthians 11:24, see also 1 Corinthians 12:4, 1 Corinthians 12:12, 1 Corinthians 13:13. "They have taken the Lord out of the tomb," John 20:2. "She gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in bands of cloth, and laid him in a manger," Luke 2:7, John 1:1. "Thus says the Lord ... I am about to do a new thing; now it springs forth, do you not perceive it? I will make a way in the wilderness and rivers in the desert," Isaiah 43:16, 19.

CONVERSE (ERIE) (WHAT A FRIEND)(8.7.8.7. D)

1. God of queer, trans-gress-ive spa-ces:
Lav-ish man-ger, emp-ty tomb,
wine-dark loaves and pre-cious gra-ces
bend our bar-ren lives to bloom.

2. God’s own de-vi-ance is Jes-us:
Born of vir-gin, word made flesh,
dead and bur-ied, and still ris-es?
What ab-norm-al world-li-ness!

3. Thank God for this grave dis-ord-er:
Shroud and sor-row fall un-done;
East-er gar-ments, at whose or-der,
swad-dle the be-lov-ed one?

4. Broth-ers, bind ye to each oth-er,
Sis-ters, too, and have no shame.
Sing with God our Fath-er-Moth-er,
Love that dares now speak its name.

5. With our un-bound* God con-fess-ing:
Turn all frac-ture in-to praise,
be-ne-dic-tion in-to bless-ing,
fab-u-lous and full of days.

* or 'threesome,' as in the original

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January 08, 2007

621R In Love I Put My Highest Trust

Title: In Love I Put My Highest Trust, Psalm 71:1-6, from The New Verson, Brady and Tate (1698), adapted REH (2007); OLD 29TH, C.M.D., Anglo-Genevan Psalter (1556), harmony, Scottish Psalter (1635). Alternative (and perhaps better known) hymn tunes to consider include Vaughn Williams' KINGSFOLD, C.M.D., and FOREST GREEN, C.M.D., both of which may be found in Singing the Living Tradition and in The New Century Hymnal. Psalm 71 is an appointed Revised Common Lectionary reading for Epiphany 4C and Proper 16C/Ordinary 21C, as well as for the Tuesday during Holy Week. The lyrics also echo Psalm 139:13 (NRSV), "You knit me in my mother's womb." The lyrics address, in a broad way, the often unchurchly topic of bullying, an area of resurgent concern for young men and women in the Internet age. Advice to bullies and their victims might include: "Do not repay anyone evil for evil, but take thought for what is noble in the sight of all," Romans 12:19; see also Proverbs 24:7. "Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who abuse you," Luke 6:27-28. This ode to Love echoes too the Greek Testament, in words that have come to us as "Deus caritas est," or "God is Love," words of particular significance for many Universalists. 1 John 4:16

OLD 29TH (C.M.D.)

1. In Love I put my high-est trust,
de-fend-ing hearts from chains;
And who but you can save my soul
as I cry out your names?
You are the strong and sweet-est place,
to which all souls re-sort;
And Love's de-mands do keep me safe;
they are my rock and port.

2. From cru-el taunt and cru-el word,
from earl-iest days of youth,
my heart you ev-er soothed, O God;
My life still lives in you.
Love's tough-ened care did safe-ly guard
my ten-der school-yard days;
You knit me deep with-in your womb;
Now life is con-stant praise!

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February 04, 2007

622R O Wisdom Reigns Supreme

Title: "O Wisdom Reigns Supreme," United Presbyterian Psalter (1887), Psalm 99, adapted REH (2007), ST. MICHAEL, S.M.D., Louis Bourgeois (1551), adapted William Crotch (1836). Psalm 99 is the lectionary reading for Transfiguration A & C, and Proper 24A/Ordinary 29A. Alternative tunes include ICH HALTE TREULICH STILL, S.M.D. and ST. AUGUSTINE, S.M.D. ST. MICHAEL, usually in S.M., should be well-known to most Unitarian Universalists, as the tune to the hymn "Where Is Our Holy Church?"

ST. MICHAEL (S.M.D.)

1. O Wis-dom reigns su-preme,
that all the world may wake,
though dwell-ing with the wing-ed ones,
the Earth's deep core may shake.
Lies in Je-ru-sa-lem,
the Sove-reign's sa-cred throne,
where three creeds sing one ho-ly Name,
that ev-er Life be known.

2. Our God does mer-cy love,
and jus-tice does main-tain:
In-te-gri-ty and eth-ics too
in Ja-cob did sus-tain.
May all sing prais-es high,
and Earth in prais-es laud:
All at the foot-stool wor-ship-ing,
for ho-ly is our God.

3. O Mos-es, Aar-on, priests,
all who on true Love call,
and Sa-muel trust-ing too in God,
who then an-swered them all.
Through pil-lar of Earth's clouds,
the Ho-ly One did speak:
who did set forth a cov-e-nant,
the Tor-ah, hence to keep.

4. O God, our gra-cious God,
who does a mes-sage send;
Love grants us par-don for our deeds,
that jus-tice may im-pend.
May all sing prais-es high,
and Earth in prais-es laud,
and cel-e-brate the moun-tain tops,
for ho-ly is our God.

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February 07, 2007

623R All Who With Full Intent and Mind

Words: William Kethe (circa 1561), Psalm 91:1-2, 8-16, adapted REH (2007) ; Music: WER DA WONET (L.M.D.), Vehe’s Gesangbüchlein (1537); Alternative: ANGLO-GENEVAN PSALM 91, L.M.D., French melody (1561). Lent 1C, Proper 21C, Proper 24B. God is Love, 1 John 4:8, 16.

WER DA WONET (L.M.D.)

ANGLO-GENEVAN PSALM 91 (L.M.D.)

1. All who with full in-tent and mind
in Love's high peaks by faith do dwell:
whose gra-cious pow-er all shall find
the saf-est place to serve them well.
Now say un-to our God will I,
"O you in-deed are hope most sure:
For God is Love, thus will I cry
my trust in you for-ev-er more!"

2. O all shall cer-tain-ly be-hold
what jus-tice have the self- ish earned;
but when true Love is your strong-hold,
lo, hence to Life the soul is turned.
Then will no dan-gers vis-it you,
nor will your tent or ground-cloth stir;
for come the an-gels forth a-new,
and to their strength all do de-fer.

3. So fierce-ly they shall you de-fend,
that harm you shall be sure of none,
nor you so much as once of-fend,
nor dash your foot a-gainst a stone.
You shall a-mongst the li-ons tread,
the dra-gon and the asp al-so;
O you shall nev-er live in dread,
as you a-mongst them safe-ly go.

4. For so the Sove-reign One a- bove,
bold-ly de-clares, "I know your name."
I thus will lift my praise to Love,
and foes con-found who seek Love's shame.
On me shall Life call when in need,
and I will hear though still in doubt;
in trou-bles I res-pond with speed,
that God be glor-i-fied through-out.

5. The years that shall be Time's de-sire,
that we in grace full-well may spend;
our health and life and love en-tire,
will serve all well and have no end.
All who with full in-tent and mind
in Love's high peaks by faith do dwell:
whose gra-cious pow-er all shall find
the saf-est place to serve them well.

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July 05, 2008

624R An Apple Tree Stands In the Wood

Metrical Version of Song of Songs (Song of Soloman) 2:8-13 (REH), L.M. (8.8.8.8), OLD HUNDREDTH, etc.


1. An ap-ple tree stands in the wood:
So my be-loved, a-bove the fray;
With great de-light near-by I stood;
To taste sweet fruit, as hearts do play.

2. The fes-tal house to which I come;
There I am sought but in sweet love;
Re-freshed with fruits and fresh-est plum;
Dis-may-ing love falls from a-bove.

3. O were one hand up-on my head;
And were one hand up-on my waist;
I sing to you, by red deer led;
Swear by gaz-elle, to Zi-on chased.

4. O do not stir nor wak-en love;
Not til the time your be-loved comes;
High leap-ing from the hills a-bove;
Thence bound-ing peaks un-til love hums.

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625R The Torah May My Ways Uphold

Metrical Version of Psalm 119:5-12 (REH), 8.8.8.8. (LM), OLD HUNDREDTH, etc. Lectionary Psalm for Proper 10A/Ordinary 15A.

1. The Tor-ah may my ways up-hold;
I shall not then be put to shame;
You I will praise with heart so bold;
“For-sake me not,” I’ll then ex-claim.

2. May to the youth we truth im-part;
And from your law let not us run;
We guard your words deep in our heart;
O teach us love, E-ter-nal One!

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626R O Holy Wisdom Cares For All

adapted from Wisdom of Solomon 12:13-19 (REH); http://bible.oremus.org/?ql=25942314 ; lectionary reading for Proper 11A; 8.8.8.8. (LM); hymn tune OLD HUNDREDTH, etc.


1. O Ho-ly Wis-dom cares for all;
No mon-arch can con-front her might;
She or-ders life; all heed her call;
Each dream and joy, she does e'er write.

2. So-phi-a, you are strength for doubt;
You show God's face in judg-ment mild;
Your sav-ing works make na-tions shout;
Your cleans-ing heart fills eve-ry child.

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